Seagate IronWolf NAS 18TB HDD and 510 M.2 Review

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Seagate IronWolf NAS 18TB HDD and 1.92GB M.2 Review

Introduction

Reliable storage is one of those things in life that it's easy to become blasé about. Just as you don't really care about the NCAP rating of your car until you have an accident, so we all skim over the Mean Time Before Failure and daily write allowances of our storage mediums so we can get on with the business of finding our how fast it goes, how big it is, and how small a dent it will make in our wallets.

That's until you lose a drive, then suddenly that long warranty and reliability becomes of paramount importance. Just like we're all told to back up our data and don't, it's only when things go really wrong that you realise why you should have listened. Heck we here at OC3D recently lost one of the drives in our server and, despite rebuilding the RAID array, still lost all that was written this month because the last backup was at the beginning of the month.

Seagate have been part of the storage world for longer than we care to remember. My old 286 that ran at a dizzying 16 MHz had a Seagate drive in it, they've been doing it for that long. Naturally when you've been around that long you have a lot of products aimed at the enterprise market, where storage is mission critical and can be the difference between having a business and not. Just imagine for a moment that all your hard drives died at once and you lost everything that wasn't backed up somewhere and how that might impact your life. Then imagine that your roof and food as well as the homes and nutrition of a workforce would be lost too. Suddenly reliability becomes a key desire.

The IronWolf range is aimed very much at those of you with a penchant for keeping lots of data and a wish that after a catastrophic power failure you still had that data. It's not for those who want blazing performance. Slow would be too strong a word, but slow and steady is the theme here. Perhaps 'relentless and fast enough' is better. With both an 18TB HDD for long term storage and their IronWolf 510 M.2 drive in 1.92TB capacity to ferry that data from your system to the NAS we've got two very different products to look at today.

Technical Specifications

IronWolf 18TB

Seagate IronWolf NAS 18TB HDD and 1.92GB M.2 Review

IronWolf 510


Seagate IronWolf NAS 18TB HDD and 1.92GB M.2 Review  

«Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next»

Most Recent Comments

01-01-2021, 03:54:52

Digikid
The words "RELIABLE" and "SEAGATE" NEVER belong in the same sentence. EVER!Quote

01-01-2021, 10:54:16

tgrech
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digikid View Post
The words "RELIABLE" and "SEAGATE" NEVER belong in the same sentence. EVER!
Isn't Seagate being unreliable essentially an urban myth down to people misunderstanding Backblaze data?

(IE treating it as some kind of reliable weighted sample rather than a fairly randomised set of unweighted raw data with trends often dictated by forces outside of the HDDs themselves that is not considered in the published data sets, such as the fact Backblaze at often sources cheaper consumer grade drives through unofficial means, Eg external drive extractions, 2nd hand, ect, and that their environment, mounting, ect varies widely)Quote

01-01-2021, 11:12:10

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
Isn't Seagate being unreliable essentially an urban myth down to people misunderstanding Backblaze data?

(IE treating it as some kind of reliable weighted sample rather than a fairly randomised set of unweighted raw data with trends often dictated by forces outside of the HDDs themselves that is not considered in the published data sets, such as the fact Backblaze at often sources cheaper consumer grade drives through unofficial means, Eg external drive extractions, 2nd hand, ect, and that their environment, mounting, ect varies widely)
A lot of it is that. Backblaze data got them a lot of bad press and that impression stuck. It also made people who had failed HDDs from that company more vocal with their complaints. That adds a lot of legitimacy to Backblaze's data.

I have been using a Seagate HDD in my main system for over six years with no issues. If anything it is the oldest component in my system.

The same thing happens when a lot of companies get bad press. The Corsair SFX controversy from earlier this year comes to mind. It causes anyone with a bad customer experience with that company to come up and complain, and the weight of it lowers a brand's standing.Quote

01-01-2021, 11:47:13

looz
There's no such thing as a reliable hard drive. They can be gone at any moment, and as such, you should be prepared to losing them.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.