Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia PC Performance Review

PC system requirements and Testing Methodology

Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia PC Performance Review

PC system requirements

To put things simply, Creative Assembly has been a little lazy with Total War Saga: Throne's of Britannia's PC system requirements, copy/pasting the recommended system specifications of Total War: Warhammer II, with the only edit being a change from 60GB of HDD space to 30GB. 

Remember that Thrones of Britannia doesn't use the same engine as Total War: Warhammer II, which means that we are dealing with two very different games here, though it is possible that CA created the game with this level of hardware in mind rather than developing a unique list of system requirements for the game. 

MINIMUM:
OS: Windows 7 64Bit
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo 3.0Ghz
Memory: 5 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 460 1GB | AMD Radeon HD 5770 1GB | Intel HD4000 @720p
Storage: 30 GB available space

RECOMMENDED:
OS: Windows 7 / 8 (8.1)/ 10 64Bit
Processor: Intel Core i5-4570 3.20GHz
Memory: 8 GB RAM
Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 4GB | AMD Radeon R9 290X 4GB @1080p
Storage: 30 GB available space


Testing Methodology


OC3D is a website that is dedicated PC hardware, so you better believe that we test every game on a wide range of hardware configurations. This commitment to variety means that we will be using both Intel and AMD based testbeds as well as a range of GPU offerings from both Nvidia and Radeon. 

Our primary test system uses Intel's X99 platform, containing am Intel Core i7 6850K at a fixed clock speed of 4GHz. This testbed will use 32GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR4 memory and will be powered and cooled by an HX1200i PSU and an H110i AIO liquid cooler respectively, with everything sitting inside a Corsair 460X chassis. In this system, we are using an ASUS Strix X99 motherboard. 

 


Game Test Rig

Intel i7 6850K @4.0 GHz
ASUS X99 Strix
Corsair Vengeance LP 4x8GB DDR4 3200MHz
Corsair HX1200i
Corsair H110i GT
Windows 10 x64 "Creators Update"

 


Secondary Ryzen Test System

Aside from our standard X99 test system we also have a testbed based on AMD's Ryzen 7 1700X CPU, which will sit at a clock speed of 4GHz be housed in an ASUS Crosshair VI Hero motherboard. This system will use Corsair's 3200MHz Vengeance White LED memory and is contained inside another Corsair 460X chassis. 

This extra system will allow us to see if any games offer a performance advantage to AMD's Ryzen or Intel's Core series processors.  

 

AMD Ryzen Game Test Rig
AMD Ryzen 7 1700X @ 4.0GHz
ASUS X370 Crosshair VI Hero
Corsair Vengeance LED 2x8GB DDR4 3200MHz
Corsair 460X System Chassis
Corsair RMi650
Corsair H115i
Nvidia GTX 1080 Founders Edition
Windows 10 x64 "Creators Update"

 

Rise of the Tomb Raider update - Has AMD Performance Ryzen?

 

GPU Selection

No gaming test suite would be complete without a selection of GPUs, which in this case covers Nvidia's GTX 10-series and 9-series and AMD's RX Vega, RX 400 and R9 300 series graphics cards. We have replaced our RX 480 GPU with its RX 580 equivalent, giving us a fairer comparison point between AMD/Nvidia's modern graphics card lineups. 

Geforce GTX 10-series

- Nvidia GTX 1080 Founders Edition
- Nvidia GTX 1070 Founders Edition
- ASUS GTX 1060 Strix Gaming OC


Geforce GTX 900-series 

- ASUS GTX 960 Strix 

       No Man's Sky PC Performance ReviewMetal Gear Solid 5 Performance Review with ASUS

AMD RX Vega Series

- AMD RX Vega 56

AMD RX 500 Series


- AMD RX 580 Strix OC


AMD GCN GPUs

- ASUS R9 380 Strix

Far Cry 5 PC Performance ReviewMetal Gear Solid 5 Performance Review with ASUS

Keyboard & Mouse

To control this setup, we will be using Corsair Strafe RGB keyboard with Cherry MX Silent keys alongside a Corsair M65 RGB mouse, matching the general theme of this RGB illuminated system.  

Cherry MX Silent Keys are ideal for gaming, coming with similar characteristics as Cherry MX Red keys, but with quieter operation. This comparative silence will help keep players immersed in their games, without the distracting clicks that are present in other Cherry key switches.  

 

 Warhammer 40,000 Dawn of War III PC performance review  Warhammer 40,000 Dawn of War III PC performance review

  

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Most Recent Comments

10-05-2018, 14:30:42

NeverBackDown
I think you were being slightly too harsh about the multi threading support. I mean we all know the Attila Engine was awful and expecting to much more certainly should have been out of the equation. I don't think comparing it to the newer TW3 Engine used in Warhammer is practical considering those were fully fleshed out titles rather than a spin off.

But all things considered the engine is MUCH better than the Attila one. That said I do still agree that 32bit and lack of Multi threading improvements were horrible ideas and should have at least had more work gone into it. But it's a spin off. So I guess as long as it was better than before they thought it was okay.


I also agree on having separate settings for Campaign and Battles. They are so VASTLY different in what they really stress on the system that it makes little sense to switch settings all the time. Which is something people with lower end hardware have to do.Quote

10-05-2018, 15:07:04

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
I think you were being slightly too harsh about the multi threading support. I mean we all know the Attila Engine was awful and expecting to much more certainly should have been out of the equation. I don't think comparing it to the newer TW3 Engine used in Warhammer is practical considering those were fully fleshed out titles rather than a spin off.

But all things considered the engine is MUCH better than the Attila one. That said I do still agree that 32bit and lack of Multi threading improvements were horrible ideas and should have at least had more work gone into it. But it's a spin off. So I guess as long as it was better than before they thought it was okay.


I also agree on having separate settings for Campaign and Battles. They are so VASTLY different in what they really stress on the system that it makes little sense to switch settings all the time. Which is something people with lower end hardware have to do.
I think it is accurate to say that my harshness could stem from my love for the series, as a sincerely hope that Creative Assembly can take some of my criticisms to heart.

Yeah, I think the best thing that they can do is split campaign and battle settings, though obviously some things like unit sizes will be shared between both modes.

As I have said in the review, I like the game, I look forward to playing more, but the focus here is on performance and when there is a major shortcoming it needs to be discussed in detail.

TBH I am very excited to see what CA bring to the table with Three Kingdoms. I'm very excited to see what CA can do with a historical Total War on the latest iteration of their Warscape engine.Quote

10-05-2018, 15:48:03

NeverBackDown
I understand and I am in the same boat as you.

I won't be getting it though. I just don't think it's worth it. We already had a ton of other Viking themed gameplay in Attila and playing more of it for the sake of different features doesn't interest me for the money.

I don't have much hope for 3K myself. China is boring to me and with how Britannia and Warhammer 2 have gone I am not excited.Quote
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