Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia PC Performance Review

The next Total War - What has to change

Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia PC Performance Review

The next Total War - What has to change  

Graphical Settings

If there is one thing that Creative Assembly should take away from Thrones of Britannia, it is that future Total War games need to have separate graphical options menus for the game's campaign mode and real-time battle sequences. 

All too often we found that having stable performance in one didn't mean having steady performance in the other, creating situations where we had to make visual/graphical sacrifices in one to serve the other. Offering the option for unique graphical settings for each mode can provide gamers with the best of both worlds, allowing players to have the highest levels of graphical fidelity and performance in both the game's campaign and battle modes.  

What we would also like to see is more detailed labels for each of the game's graphical settings, detailing how each option affect CPU, GPU and memory performance. This adjustment would make it much easier for gamers to optimise the game's performance. 


CPU Utilisation

If there is another thing to take from Thrones of Britannia, it is that The Attila engine used within the title is in dire need of some additional multi-threading support. While some of the games performance problems may be due to Thrones of Britannia operating as a 32-bit application, it is hard to see why such issues are present where a better version of the Warscape engine exists in Total War Warhammer. 

While CPU performance has traditionally been a weakness for Total War titles, there is no excuse anymore this type of issue to be so prevalent in Thrones of Britannia. In Total War: Warhammer II we can see Skaven hordes with units up to 200 rats strong slam into Elven lines as Dragon and Magic also roam the map. If this kind of variety and action is available with relative stability in Total War Warhammer II, there is no excuse for Thrones of Britania having harsher CPU issues given its lower unit sizes and relatively limited amounts of unit variation. 

We know that many of these issues are caused by Thrones of Britannia's use of a modified version of Creative Assembly's Total War Attila engine, though that does little to satisfy the users whose systems are CPU limited when they have six plus cores at 4GHz.  

We sincerely hope that future Total War games are not so CPU limited on both the campaign map and the battlefield, as most PC gamers cannot afford to purchase Intel's latest i7 and overclock it to 5+GHz.  

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Most Recent Comments

10-05-2018, 14:30:42

NeverBackDown
I think you were being slightly too harsh about the multi threading support. I mean we all know the Attila Engine was awful and expecting to much more certainly should have been out of the equation. I don't think comparing it to the newer TW3 Engine used in Warhammer is practical considering those were fully fleshed out titles rather than a spin off.

But all things considered the engine is MUCH better than the Attila one. That said I do still agree that 32bit and lack of Multi threading improvements were horrible ideas and should have at least had more work gone into it. But it's a spin off. So I guess as long as it was better than before they thought it was okay.


I also agree on having separate settings for Campaign and Battles. They are so VASTLY different in what they really stress on the system that it makes little sense to switch settings all the time. Which is something people with lower end hardware have to do.Quote

10-05-2018, 15:07:04

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
I think you were being slightly too harsh about the multi threading support. I mean we all know the Attila Engine was awful and expecting to much more certainly should have been out of the equation. I don't think comparing it to the newer TW3 Engine used in Warhammer is practical considering those were fully fleshed out titles rather than a spin off.

But all things considered the engine is MUCH better than the Attila one. That said I do still agree that 32bit and lack of Multi threading improvements were horrible ideas and should have at least had more work gone into it. But it's a spin off. So I guess as long as it was better than before they thought it was okay.


I also agree on having separate settings for Campaign and Battles. They are so VASTLY different in what they really stress on the system that it makes little sense to switch settings all the time. Which is something people with lower end hardware have to do.
I think it is accurate to say that my harshness could stem from my love for the series, as a sincerely hope that Creative Assembly can take some of my criticisms to heart.

Yeah, I think the best thing that they can do is split campaign and battle settings, though obviously some things like unit sizes will be shared between both modes.

As I have said in the review, I like the game, I look forward to playing more, but the focus here is on performance and when there is a major shortcoming it needs to be discussed in detail.

TBH I am very excited to see what CA bring to the table with Three Kingdoms. I'm very excited to see what CA can do with a historical Total War on the latest iteration of their Warscape engine.Quote

10-05-2018, 15:48:03

NeverBackDown
I understand and I am in the same boat as you.

I won't be getting it though. I just don't think it's worth it. We already had a ton of other Viking themed gameplay in Attila and playing more of it for the sake of different features doesn't interest me for the money.

I don't have much hope for 3K myself. China is boring to me and with how Britannia and Warhammer 2 have gone I am not excited.Quote
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