ASUS X399 ROG Zenith Extreme Alpha Review

Temperatures

ASUS X399 ROG Zenith Extreme Alpha Preview

Temperatures

All the hard work that the ASUS design department have put into these revised, robust, over-engineered power phases and their cooling was time well spent. The X399 ROG Zenith Extreme Alpha barely breaks a sweat. Its worth noting that the FFE VRM temp results were basically achieved by covering the front and rear of the VRM's with insanely loud bench fans running 3000rpm. The fact the Zenith manged to match and even beat these without any troubles and without those heatsink fans even starting to run is insane. If it got that hot running 32 Cores and 64 Threads with a fixed manual overclock it does make us wonder if Asus have designed this ready to cope with the rumored next gen 48 Core Threadripper 3....?

ASUS X399 ROG Zenith Extreme Alpha CPU Temperatures  


ASUS X399 ROG Zenith Extreme Alpha VRM Temperatures  

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Most Recent Comments

23-04-2019, 07:16:54

Avet
Another great review TTL style.

You got a bit confused in the video Tom. Slow brain to mouth connection?

IR3555M are smart power stages. They integrate both high, and low side mosfets with additional sensing, and protection circuits into one package. They are those chips above inductors (chokes) at the front. SMDs at the back are capacitors for ironing out the current. Either aluminium polymer, or tantalum.

Pretty much all VRM controllers on motherboards have 8 PWM signals. ASUS uses 8 PWM signals with 2 power stages for each signal. And in that case 8 PWM signals interleaving. MSI uses doublers for each PWM signal so in the end there are 16 PWM signals interleaving (one for each power stage). Both VRMs spread the load over 16 power stages for better efficiency.Quote

23-04-2019, 10:44:17

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avet View Post
Another great review TTL style.

You got a bit confused in the video Tom. Slow brain to mouth connection?

IR3555M are smart power stages. They integrate both high, and low side mosfets with additional sensing, and protection circuits into one package. They are those chips above inductors (chokes) at the front. SMDs at the back are capacitors for ironing out the current. Either aluminium polymer, or tantalum.

Pretty much all VRM controllers on motherboards have 8 PWM signals. ASUS uses 8 PWM signals with 2 power stages for each signal. And in that case 8 PWM signals interleaving. MSI uses doublers for each PWM signal so in the end there are 16 PWM signals interleaving (one for each power stage). Both VRMs spread the load over 16 power stages for better efficiency.

I meant to say PWM on the back not mosfet.... Just me being a spaz, I knew what I meant Quote
Reply
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