ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II Review

Conclusion

ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II Review

Conclusion

The ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II is one of those motherboards that brings a lot to the party, with a few minor things that require explanation.

Starting with the aesthetics, the Prime series famously introduced quality white parts to the motherboard universe, ones that didn't end up yellowing over time - assuming you didn't chain smoke right next to your PC of course. The Deluxe II continues the trend by having white plastics from the chipset heatsink to the centre, including the OLED display, and the IO section down to the SupremeFX audio is also covered in white. The IO section also has a stripe of RGB lighting built in, which is echoed on the chipset heatsink. Beneath that we have a silver heatsink which is, curiously, a different shade of silver than the M.2 heat-spreaders. In the end you have the monochrome colouring that has ended up totally dominating the market but instead of being simply black, or black and white, it's like all the shades of a greyscale. We're not entirely sure how successful this has been, but it certainly is something that you'll either love or hate.

Less subjective is the addition of a raft of technologies to the Prime formula which leads to the Deluxe II having something for everyone. At the basic level the amount of pump, AIO and fan headers alongside ASUS own RGB and addressable headers mean that there is plenty to keep your system cool and looking spectacular. The Prime Deluxe II also comes with the new ASUS Node header which connects to all sorts of interface types, including the supplied fan extension card, letting you control them all from within the ASUS Software Suite. Network connectivity has the Intel Gigabit LAN and, if you've got a serious networking setup, support for 5G LAN via the Aquantia AQC-111C RJ45 port. Those of you who live in the wireless world can enjoy the benefits of the Intel AC-9260 MU-MIMO wide channel HT160 wireless connectivity alongside the latest Bluetooth 5.0 format providing longer distances and faster transfer rates than Bluetooth 4.

Performance is a little bit of a mixed bag. At stock the Prime Deluxe II is okay, but never more than okay. There is a slight reduction in memory bandwidth when compared to the other X299 setups we've tested which has a snowball effect in the type of benchmarks we run, leading to decent but unspectacular scores. On the flip side the overclocking performs well, taking our Core i9-7900X up to 4.6 GHz across all ten cores with 3200 MHz DDR4. This left it running in the midpack of our test suite, although a closer look at the actual scores we achieved shows that whilst it never really spanks the competition, neither is it remotely disgraced. If you like the looks and the feature set then clearly it should be up on your wishlist.

The one thing that we really feel is worth highlighting on its own is the inclusion of DisplayPort inputs on the IO section, letting you fully utilise the Thunderbolt 3 tech to daisy chain your displays. We know it's a niche feature, but until now Thunderbolt 3 has been something with a lot of potential that hasn't been taken advantage of, whereas now with the ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II if you have the hardware available to take full advantage of this particular feature, then it's the only X299 motherboard that utilises it to its fullest. Kudos to ASUS for making the effort, especially when the audience is somewhat limited. If you build it, they will come.

The Prime Deluxe II has a rich feature set and good performance that makes it a very solid choice for those of you who like either the white colour scheme or want a motherboard that isn't part of the ROG range. It's an unconventional choice but one you'll be glad you made.

ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II Review  

Discuss the ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II on the OC3D Forums.

«Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Next»

Most Recent Comments

02-01-2019, 15:05:49

Avet
Disclaimer: This is a personal rant. I was looking forward to this board because i like ASUS, and i like Deluxe boards. (I am rocking Z97 Deluxe now) And this could have bean the perfect board for my next system in the near future (possibly). I need Thunderbolt and I was waiting for this board's release. I would be happy if i am wrong and this sin't the case.

Amazing looking board, but it has a catastrophic flaw. I read through documentation and it is not specified anywhere, but if you look at the lane distribution Thunderbolt 3 is connected via PCH. Also there is no block diagram in the manual. Hmm... Intel platforms don't have 24 PCH lanes, they have 4. Because PCH is connected to CPU via DMI 3.0 link which is PCI-E 3 x4. So PCH is basically a PLX chip that governs the traffic. It is enough to put 1 NVME drive on PCH slot, with couple of HDDs, with all the regular traffic (USBs, Network, etc.) and DMI is clogged up. Where do you find the bandwidth then for 2 Thunderbolt 3 pots? You can't run 1 at full speed via PCH.

They could have done it with CPU lanes. They have done it before. Previous Deluxe boards had crazy lane distribution. And you could connect anything. Rampage VI Extreme has good lane distribution. You could run Dimm.2 drives from PCH or from CPU lanes. If you run it form CPU last PCI-E slot is reduced to x4 from x8. If you run them from PCH, PCI-E x4 slot is disabled. Brilliant. And what was wrong with add-in board on previous Deluxe motherboards? If you need it use it, and you have proper CPU x4 lanes. If you don't, then leave it in the box. This way if you need Thunderbolt 3 you can't use it. And you can't put add-in board. And it says it supports it.

Just a cheep marketing trick to say that board has native support for Thunderbolt 3. If you need Thunderbolt 3 connectivity don't bother with this board. It doesn't support it. Go with any other board that has Thunderbolt 3 support via add-in card.

Back to the drawing board with this one ASUS.Quote

02-01-2019, 15:40:35

AlienALX
She is a stunner, though. Man that's a bloody good looking motherboard.Quote

02-01-2019, 16:31:33

FTLN
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avet View Post
Disclaimer: This is a personal rant. I was looking forward to this board because i like ASUS, and i like Deluxe boards. (I am rocking Z97 Deluxe now) And this could have bean the perfect board for my next system in the near future (possibly). I need Thunderbolt and I was waiting for this board's release. I would be happy if i am wrong and this sin't the case.

Amazing looking board, but it has a catastrophic flaw. I read through documentation and it is not specified anywhere, but if you look at the lane distribution Thunderbolt 3 is connected via PCH. Also there is no block diagram in the manual. Hmm... Intel platforms don't have 24 PCH lanes, they have 4. Because PCH is connected to CPU via DMI 3.0 link which is PCI-E 3 x4. So PCH is basically a PLX chip that governs the traffic. It is enough to put 1 NVME drive on PCH slot, with couple of HDDs, with all the regular traffic (USBs, Network, etc.) and DMI is clogged up. Where do you find the bandwidth then for 2 Thunderbolt 3 pots? You can't run 1 at full speed via PCH.

They could have done it with CPU lanes. They have done it before. Previous Deluxe boards had crazy lane distribution. And you could connect anything. Rampage VI Extreme has good lane distribution. You could run Dimm.2 drives from PCH or from CPU lanes. If you run it form CPU last PCI-E slot is reduced to x4 from x8. If you run them from PCH, PCI-E x4 slot is disabled. Brilliant. And what was wrong with add-in board on previous Deluxe motherboards? If you need it use it, and you have proper CPU x4 lanes. If you don't, then leave it in the box. This way if you need Thunderbolt 3 you can't use it. And you can't put add-in board. And it says it supports it.

Just a cheep marketing trick to say that board has native support for Thunderbolt 3. If you need Thunderbolt 3 connectivity don't bother with this board. It doesn't support it. Go with any other board that has Thunderbolt 3 support via add-in card.

Back to the drawing board with this one ASUS.


Also my rant is - Shame that readers have to pick up on stuff like this, this is the stuff reviewers should be highlighting.

ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II = Crap Board = Don't buy itQuote

03-01-2019, 19:27:02

Gothmoth
Quote:
Originally Posted by FTLN View Post
Also my rant is - Shame that readers have to pick up on stuff like this, this is the stuff reviewers should be highlighting.

ASUS X299 Prime Deluxe II = Crap Board = Don't buy it

not to step on anyones foot here but....

reviewing today means benchmarking a few dozen apps and games. something that is completely useless for me. i don´t care about 5% performance difference.


it´s nice to know that a board is as fast as to be expected.... but that´s it.





the flaws a board has you will most likely not find on vlogs or "review" websites.

they install windows and run a few tests. then they focus on the next content to create. lately some folks focus on VRM temps and but that is as deep as it gets.

i have seen so many boards praised only to find obvious issues in real life.



example... a board has 6 SATA ports and not a single website (out of 5) mentions that 2 of them need to be disabled when you enable another feature.
it is a chipset (pci lane) limitation but all you read is "the board has 6 SATA ports".... yeah well i can see that. i can read a spec list and look at a photo.Quote

04-01-2019, 09:26:22

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gothmoth View Post


example... a board has 6 SATA ports and not a single website (out of 5) mentions that 2 of them need to be disabled when you enable another feature.
it is a chipset (pci lane) limitation but all you read is "the board has 6 SATA ports".... yeah well i can see that. i can read a spec list and look at a photo.

Those kind of details get covered in the initial cpu/platform review - no need to bring it up on every single board.

As for the Thunderbolt - I have no way to accurately test it (I dont have one TB enabled screen let alone 2 or 3) and to say about the bandwidth Id need to say why its required and what the impact has been - not might be.
Sometimes you just have to do the best that you can do with what you have available.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.