AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X 64 Core Monster Review

Conclusion

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X 64 Core Monster Review

Conclusion

Now that was a lot of fun, and quite eye-opening.

Let's start by repeating something we've said a lot throughout this review, namely that the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X is not for everyone. If you use your computer for a whole range of tasks, then you'll be much better off going for a lower core count processor that runs at higher clock speeds. So many things we threw at the 3990X just didn't know what to do with all these cores. By not using all 64 cores they were more reliant upon the ones they were using running at higher clock speeds, and naturally, when you're cramming 64 cores onto a single chip, there will always be compromises made in the clock speed department. Anyone who read our old Xeon reviews knows that high core counts can greatly limit the speed a processor can run at, in fact, AMD deserves a lot of credit for getting such huge - relatively - clock speeds out of the densely packed die of the TR 3990X. If you want to game and tool around on the net, then 64 cores are too many really.

However, if you have got the application that can maximise the abilities of the TR 3990X, then the results are ridiculously good. The Blender and Cinebench results in particular never stopped being so incredible that we had to laugh out of the sheer number-crunching capabilities of the 3990X. Anyone who has watched a few boxes slowly fills up on a Cinebench run will be left dumbfounded at how fast the 3990X works. The image almost appears as one, instead of appearing piece-meal. The Ryzen Threadripper 3990X has consistently impressed us. The benefits it has to the speed you can get things done is almost incalculable. As we said on the benchmark page it would render 90 minutes of 4K footage in the same time as the Intel 10980XE can render 30 minutes, and that is by no means a slight on the Intel CPU, something we would all gratefully have in our systems should our numbers come up on the lottery. It's just that the TR 3990X is another step forwards in core count and thus rendering speed.

Overclocking showed us how carefully AMD has built the foundation of the user-experience with the 3990X and Threadripper as a whole. If you approach it in the same way, you approach overclocking any CPU with a reasonable amount of cores you'll be left disappointed. But resist the temptation to fiddle with the voltages, just tweak the Offset, let the motherboard limits control the Precision Boost power settings, and you'll be happy as it's possible to be. A glance through our results show how much the tweaked setup - the yellow result - smashes the overclocked - green - result out of the park. Take your time, and it will reward you.

Lastly, the ASUS Zenith II Extreme Alpha was a joy to run. Without this processor in the world, it was difficult to fully understand the changes ASUS had made to it when compared to the original Zenith II Extreme. In actuality, ASUS' original Zenith II Extreme is perfectly capable of handling the 3990X, but when you compare the two back to back, and indeed the ASUS against its rival flagship models, and it's clear that the work on air was a roaring success. We just couldn't stress the power phases on the Alpha, no matter how much we demanded of it. However if for some reason you're a bit limited on funds after spending £4000 on a CPU and are going to be putting a full cover water block on your Zenith II anyways, then the original board isn't to be sniffed at.

Sure, you need a very specific set of circumstances to need 64 cores. Sure, a healthy bank balance is also a necessity, but if you want what the Threadripper 3990X has to offer there is nothing, nothing, around that can touch it for hilariously fast rendering speeds. Someone hand Intel a candle, they are so far in the dark with anything Threadripper has to offer it's actually starting to get a bit embarrassing. 

Stay safe. Stay home. We love you all.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X 64 Core Monster Review  

Discuss the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X on the OC3D Forums.

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Most Recent Comments

16-04-2020, 11:02:27

AlienALX
Ooo you got one?

Manners AMD, manners !Quote

18-04-2020, 18:59:16

Diablo
Excellent review TTL!

I can't get quite the same peaks on PBO in cinebench R20 (stuck at ~28K), but it chews renders, VMs, and anything else I can throw at it.

I find I am hitting current / power limits before I hit the heat limit when I OC. I can get 4.2 all core at 1.38V, and can hit 600W+ on the CPU (according to AIDA), but if I hit it with a prime load, despite the temps being below 95C, it will hit OCP limits. Does the Alpha have a higher than 200% power limit over the Z2E?

Getting the heat out of this chip is nearly impossible, I'm running a quad + single 120mm (so 5 x 120mm) just for the CPU loop, and an EK waterblock for the threadripper chip (needs to be a big cold plate), and even so I see delta T (above the coolant) of 70C. Reminds me of the pentium 4 days (except this time with the performance to match!)Quote

30-04-2020, 05:45:37

Luxspew
I was not planning on getting one at all but I did get one because there was a silly deal going on so I jumped on it and got one! now I need to build the rest of the PC...

Feel free to post more about this beast! personally I am more curious about the Ram and the different speeds they say these boards can handle. Aside from the limits of Windows, it says it handles 3200Mhz ram. I even seen a few charts showing if I got 3800mhz ram it does better too but only if you OC the processor etc.... but then you see things like "only supports 256gbs of 2666mhz ram... or 3200mhz of 128gbz both in quad channel configurations" for the best results.

But it is $400 USD cheaper to buy the 2666Mhz kit over the 3200 kit if ill never be able to use the full 3200mhz.. Obviously the best way to test is to render massive 4-8k files that needs all the ram only can give.. *edit* but the loose timings and CPU clock speeds with the frequency on the ram speeds is suppose to change how things work for performance.

Also the m.2 4.0 speed tests... Lots of things I will be testing myself once I get mine up and running!Quote

30-04-2020, 06:17:43

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luxspew View Post
I was not planning on getting one at all but I did get one because there was a silly deal going on so I jumped on it and got one! now I need to build the rest of the PC...

Feel free to post more about this beast! personally I am more curious about the Ram and the different speeds they say these boards can handle. Aside from the limits of Windows, it says it handles 3200Mhz ram. I even seen a few charts showing if I got 3800mhz ram it does better too but only if you OC the processor etc.... but then you see things like "only supports 256gbs of 2666mhz ram... or 3200mhz of 128gbz both in quad channel configurations" for the best results.

But it is $400 USD cheaper to buy the 2666Mhz kit over the 3200 kit if ill never be able to use the full 3200mhz.. Obviously the best way to test is to render massive 4-8k files that needs all the ram only can give.. *edit* but the loose timings and CPU clock speeds with the frequency on the ram speeds is suppose to change how things work for performance.

Also the m.2 4.0 speed tests... Lots of things I will be testing myself once I get mine up and running!
That sounds very interesting. I would love to read about your findings.Quote
Reply
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