AMD Ryzen 7 3800X Review

Introduction and Technical Specifications

AMD Ryzen 7 3800X Review

Introduction

The 3rd Generation Ryzen processors have been hugely successful, combining excellent performance in every possible scenario with some cutting edge technologies and AMDs legendarily competitive pricing.

So far we've looked at a few of their models from the basic Ryzen 5 3400G all the way up to the current flagship Ryzen 9 3900X. If you are an enthusiastic user of your computer and everything it can possibly do then you'll know how important it is to have a well rounded CPU that has enough performance to handle video rendering or high resolution photo editing whilst also being easy enough to use to let you game whenever you wish without having to disable cores or worry about your fan profiles.

In short, you want a one stop solution. Probably the model that best straddles the line between affordability and performance is the one we have in for review today, the Ryzen 7 3800X. With a boost clock that hits around 4.5 GHz as well as eight cores and sixteen threads it is capable of handling all that you can demand of it, yet with a TDP of 105W and a price tag around the £370 mark it is also more affordable than the beefier range topping Ryzen 9 3900X but should still keep everything running smoothly.

That is, as always, what we're here to discover.

Technical Specifications

This table will be familiar to anyone who has studied the Ryzen range, and you can see that the Ryzen 7 3800X is similar to the Ryzen 7 3700X we've already reviewed, albeit with a big base clock increase and a reasonable boost clock improvement. Is that enough to best the already great Ryzen 7 3700X in our performance graphs?

(c)OC3DRyzen 9 3950XRyzen 9 3900XRyzen 7 3800XRyzen 7 3700XRyzen 5 3600XRyzen 5 3600
Base Clock3.5 GHz3.8 GHz3.9 GHz3.6 GHz3.8 GHz3.6 GHz
Boost Clock4.7 GHz4.6 GHz4.5 GHz4.4 GHz4.4 GHz4.2 GHz
Core/Thread16/3212/248/168/166/126/12
L2 Cache8 MB6 MB4 MB4 MB3 MB3 MB
L3 Cache 64 MB64 MB32 MB32 MB32 MB32 MB
TDP105W105W105W65W95W65W
Chiplets332222
MSRP$749$499$399$329$249$199
Comparison i9-9900Ki7-9700Ki7-9700Ki5-9600Ki5-9600
CoolerWraith Prism RGBWraith Prism RGBWraith Prism RGBWraith Prism RGBWraith SpireWraith Stealth

Let's look at some slides before we move on to our testing.

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Most Recent Comments

30-08-2019, 10:17:53

Giggyolly
It's a shame AMD weren't able to eek higher clock speeds out of this gen.
If the 3800x boosted to 4.6 it would probably have been a more agreeable step-above the 3700x.Quote

30-08-2019, 11:39:05

Bagpuss
I must admit that I find it intensely annoying that these Ryzen 3700/3800's beat my 9900K in Cinebench.


..It's become an unscratchable itch of irritation.Quote

30-08-2019, 17:49:30

Avet
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bagpuss View Post
I must admit that I find it intensely annoying that these Ryzen 3700/3800's beat my 9900K in Cinebench.


..It's become an unscratchable itch of irritation.
Yes but 9900K at 5GHz still beats them in pretty much everything else. I really like this AMD release, but they are still just one step behind.Quote

01-09-2019, 00:17:00

Celt
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avet View Post
Yes but 9900K at 5GHz still beats them in pretty much everything else. I really like this AMD release, but they are still just one step behind.
Not hardly, my 3900x stomps all over a 9900K in any multi-threaded application, and even in games is now a wash between them in any practical sense. That's without forcing an overclock. Intel is now the one behind the eight-ball and they know it.

Epyc "Rome" in the server space and the new soon to be released Threadripper 2 for HEDT will be another kick in the pants.

The coolest thing for me is I just flashed a new bios to my Crosshair VI Hero X370 and dropped in a new 3900X, no other expense involved.Quote

01-09-2019, 20:15:49

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avet View Post
Yes but 9900K at 5GHz still beats them in pretty much everything else. I really like this AMD release, but they are still just one step behind.
You actually believe that? Wow.

The only thing Intel have left is clock speed. And that's only because they're billions into trying to shrink. Which leads me onto the next bit. With big shrinks will come clock drops. That is why they haven't released any desktop parts yet. What they gain in shrinks and improvements may carry a penalty.

£ per perf they're getting smashed all over the place. The only thing they have left is clock speed and 1080p gaming, which even on consoles is becoming a thing of the past, with Control (hailed as the beginning of a new era in game graphics) running at 1440p upscaling to 4k.

1080p will become a distant memory when the next gen if consoles come out and TV prices keep falling.

There may even come a point where games may need to be downscaled to 1080p or lose detail to be displayed at that Res.Quote
Reply
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