CoolerMaster MasterAir Pro 4 Review

Installed

CoolerMaster MasterAir Pro 4 Review

Installed

There are two ways of fitting the Pro 4, the first utilises the sort of plastic push pins we've all seen on stock Intel coolers, and the second utilises an X bracket that opens out to suit the socket type.  Where the plastic pins are easy to fit and engage, we've never been convinced that they provide a firm enough contact for our needs, so we chose to use the X bracket, which unfortunately made the Pro 4 a bit of a fiddle to fit.  After bolting through to the back plate, the contact plate is then rested on the CPU, with the X being collapsed and fed through to straddle the back of the base plate, locating into a central hole on the base plate.  The four legs of the X bracket are then screwed down into the pins emanating up from the motherboard which have been previously anchored through to the back plate.  Our experience would have been fine if it weren't for the central pin of the X Bracket repeatedly popping out of its central location point, necessitating that we had to lift it off, re-locate it, and try again.

CoolerMaster MasterAir Pro 4 Review  

 

Once fitted, the Pro 4 does look smart despite is relatively small case presence.  There are no bells and whistles with regards to LED sections or LED fans, but then, this cooler is only £40, so you Shouldn't really grumble.  If you really want a bit of LED bling, it would be easy enough to substitute the supplied fan for an LED unit of you choosing.  Just make sure it isn't all style over substance.

CoolerMaster MasterAir Pro 4 Review  

 

RAM issues??? None here matey, the Pro 4 stops well short of the RAM as can be seen below.  And with the extra set of mounts, should you place this on a 2011 socet, you still won't have a problem.

CoolerMaster MasterAir Pro 4 Review  

«Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next»

Most Recent Comments

10-04-2017, 06:50:34

King of Old Old School
IMO never understood why you would want to put one of these cheaper CPU coolers on a socket 2011/V3 if you spending that much money on the X99 motherboard you should be going with an AIO or a higher end CPU cooler.Quote

10-04-2017, 14:45:00

warpuck
When a AIO clogs up you toss it. When a Noctua C/D 14 clogs up, remove fan and suck out the clog with brush and vacuum cleaner. The fan should last 5 years or more. So the only thing that is left with a AIO is the fans. DIY water has got to be cleaned and drained if you use flexible tubing annually. Rigid maybe once every 3-5 years drained and cleaned. You still have to clean the dust out of the radiators 1 or 2 twice a year. They can both be moved to another socket style. I have had three different water cooler set ups and will not be using water again. A Noctua C or D 14 is almost as good as 240mm AIO and better than most if not all 120mm AIOs. If your ambient is 40C water is better, But 30C or less no real advantage. Truth I don't get any more DAILY Ghz out of a FX-8350 with water than I do with a C14Quote

10-04-2017, 15:17:47

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by warpuck View Post
When a AIO clogs up you toss it. When a Noctua C/D 14 clogs up, remove fan and suck out the clog with brush and vacuum cleaner. The fan should last 5 years or more. So the only thing that is left with a AIO is the fans. DIY water has got to be cleaned and drained if you use flexible tubing annually. Rigid maybe once every 3-5 years drained and cleaned. You still have to clean the dust out of the radiators 1 or 2 twice a year. They can both be moved to another socket style. I have had three different water cooler set ups and will not be using water again. A Noctua C or D 14 is almost as good as 240mm AIO and better than most if not all 120mm AIOs. If your ambient is 40C water is better, But 30C or less no real advantage. Truth I don't get any more DAILY Ghz out of a FX-8350 with water than I do with a C14
Ever use a AIO?
I've used one virtually 24/7 for nearly what 2 years now? Never had a hiccup. This is an older 2nd gen AIO. Still going strong. The newer ones are even more robust. Really they will last as long as fans will.Quote

14-04-2017, 11:37:37

warpuck
Used a AIO 24/7 folding with a OCed FX-8350 (4.7Ghz). (200 watts +) 24/7 operation broke down the coolant corrosion inhibitors and it clogged up after about 1 year of that kind of abuse. A premium Noctua does almost as well as a AIO and it can be cleaned with small paint brush and a vacuum cleaner. A AIO is sent back if it is under warranty. Performing surgery on it is tedious, if it is out of warranty, plus it may not work again anyway. Considering that a Coolermaster 120mm x 40mm cost almost the same as Noctua 14 at the time? Water does cool better but it does have one more working part to fail and pumps will fail. I have 2 dead pumps now. Vapor condensation cycle has no moving parts, fans are plentiful and cheap enough to keep a spare around while you wait 50,000 hours for it to fail. I still have the Coolermaster fan that came with the AIO in use as a case fan. The 8350 is still happy folding @4.6 Ghz cooled by a Noctua NH-C14S with its companion GTX 690. Both cooling items have been discontinued. Only one still works. I have come to the conclusion that water is great if your system is only used for a few hours a day to squeeze the max out of your system.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.