Cooler Master SL600M Review

Up Close - A Step Away from 'Brute Force' cooling

Cooler Master SL600M Review - Turning Case Design on it's Side

Up Close - A Step Away from 'Brute Force' cooling

With the SL600M, Cooler Master has restricted airflow to exclusively come from the bottom of the case, though the enclosure's included 200mm fans. Both of these fans can be controlled using the SL600M's integrated fan controller, supporting speeds of 400-800RPM. 

These fans can be replaced to support up to a 280mm or 360mm water cooling radiator, which can be up to 72mm thick when Graphics cards are installed in a vertical position. The top of the case features no included fans but supports 2x 140/200mm fans or three 120mm fans. There is a large gap between the SL600M's top fan mounts and the case's top aluminium panel, leaving plenty of space for airflow. 

Cooler Master's restrictive cooling design serves a dual purpose, as blocking most of the enclosure commits chimney-style airflow and compliments natural airflow principles "hot air rises", while also eliminating most areas where noise can exit the chassis and limiting dust entry to a single, filtered, area. 
  

Cooler Master SL600M Review - Turning Case Design on it's Side  

Fans of vertical GPU mounts can rejoice at the fact that Cooler Master has constructed their SL600M with the ability to support vertically-mounted multi-GPU configurations, allowing PC builders to mount every PCIe add-on card within their system vertically. Sadly, Cooler Master does not include any vertical GPU cables with their SL600M chassis, those cables a necessary add-on for those who plan to utilise this feature. 

At the base of this chassis, we can also see that the SL600M's bottom-mounted fans sit around 50mm above the user's desk, offering plenty of space for airflow, though we will note that the legs/base of this case are rather narrow, making the cake slightly less stable than we would like. With the weight of a full system, the SL600M is by no means easy to tip over, but we would prefer the case's feet to be a little more spaced out. 

Looking at the rear of this case, most of you will quickly spot the lack of a standard PSU mount at the bottom of the SL600M, as Cooler Master has decided to move the case's PSU mount to the front/top section of the enclosure (though it can be moved up and down the enclosure). This provides space for the SL600M's two bottom-mounted 200mm fans but creates an unusual system configuration when it comes to cable management. Owners of this case will need to put a little more thought into how they manage their cables. 

Cooler Master SL600M Review - Turning Case Design on it's Side  

As a professional-oriented case, the SL600M is designed to offer a clean aesthetic, offering sleek curves instead of the sharp angles of most gaming-grade cases. The top aluminium panel of the SL600M is removable and can be mounted with a tight-to-mesh and raised configurations depending on the user's preferences. 

On the front panel, the MasterCase SL600M features four USB 3.0 ports and a single USB 3.1 Gen 2 Type-C header. A sensor is available on this case that will allow the enclosure's four USB 3.0 headers to glow with white light, a useful feature when you need to find a USB port in a dark environment. A fan speed controller is also available at the front of the chassis, as well power/reset switches and audio input and output jacks. 


Cooler Master SL600M Review - Turning Case Design on it's Side  

Unlike most modern MasterCase designs, Cooler Master has shipped their SL600M without any integrated RGB illumination, giving the innards of the case a dark appearance without the presence of RGB components. This helps the SL600M blend into professional/workstation environments, while also leaving home users plenty of room to integrate custom lighting systems. 

Cooler Master SL600M Review - Turning Case Design on it's Side  

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Most Recent Comments

30-10-2018, 15:04:05

barnsley
this is the one case in the past year or so thats actually got my attention (and got me back on here). Good job Coolermaster!Quote

30-10-2018, 15:25:29

Bartacus
It would be interesting to see how much you could pack in that thing. Could you actually get a pair of 360 rads in there, and have room for other stuff? I like the idea of breaking away from 'traditional' layouts, and this looks interesting.Quote

30-10-2018, 21:54:39

Avet
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartacus View Post
It would be interesting to see how much you could pack in that thing. Could you actually get a pair of 360 rads in there, and have room for other stuff? I like the idea of breaking away from 'traditional' layouts, and this looks interesting.
It is not like they are inventing something new. This layout exists for a long time. InWin, and Jonsbo have it for years. HexGear did it. Siverstone has it since the beginning of time. CoolerMaster marketing department is pushing it hard like it is something new, but it isn't. In recent years we had few good cases, and metric tons of bad ones, all based on the same "mainstream" design. Actually i think it is really poorly implemented. They could have done it much better.Quote

30-10-2018, 22:52:18

Bartacus
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avet View Post
It is not like they are inventing something new. This layout exists for a long time. InWin, and Jonsbo have it for years. HexGear did it. Siverstone has it since the beginning of time. CoolerMaster marketing department is pushing it hard like it is something new, but it isn't. In recent years we had few good cases, and metric tons of bad ones, all based on the same "mainstream" design. Actually i think it is really poorly implemented. They could have done it much better.
Yeah agreed. My layout comment was more in reference to the PSU placement and cover. I'm not too struck on it now. Dimitri from Hardware Canucks gave it a good ripping, and pointed out a ton of flaws. Not to mention the thermals are only acceptable with the GPU set up with the PCIE extension, which DOESN'T come with the case. It's sold SEPARATELY. For a case at that price point, that sucks. With the GPU in a standard position, the whole thermal chimney goes right out the window and the temps are not good. For a company calling themselves Cooler Master, that's kinda funny.Quote

31-10-2018, 01:19:15

Avet
I really don't know what is happening with with case industry. If you look in each segment of the market, apart from Meshify C every single case has at least one massive flaw.Quote
Reply
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