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Unreal Engine 4's Latest Preview Supports "Real-Time Ray Tracing"

Unreal Engine 4.22 boasts some impressive DXR capabilities

Unreal Engine 4's Latest Preview Supports

Unreal Engine 4's Latest Preview Supports "Real-Time Ray Tracing"

Epic Games' Unreal Engine 4 will soon receive a major update, one which will integrate real-time ray tracing into the engine, enabling a wider range of developers to utilise Microsoft's DXR (DirectX Raytracing) API and Nvidia's RTX hardware. 

Thanks to the powers of early access, developers are now able to start using Unreal Engine's ray tracing enabled version starting today, with Unreal Engine version 4.22.0 being available from the Epic Games Launcher starting today. Other engine improvements include support for Editor Utility Widgets, Blueprint indexing optimisations, virtual production updates and Oculus Quest support. 

When it comes to Ray Tracing features, this new version of Unreal Engine 4 will support raytraced soft shadows, reflections, ambient occlusion, real-time global illumination, translucency, a Denoiser solution for shadows, reflections and Ambient Occlusion. A full GI path tracer is also available to help developers create ground truth reference images inside Unreal Engine 4. 

This integration is a major step towards further DXR/Ray Tracing adoption, with the final version of Unreal Engine 4.22 enabling a wider range of developers to utilise the ray tracing capabilities of today's cutting-edge graphics hardware. 

Below is a video which uses Nvidia's RTX graphics technology and Epic Games' Unreal Engine 4 to showcase a rendered version of the Apollo 11 moon landing, complete with real-time ray-traced reflections.


You can join the discussion on Unreal Engine 4's 4.22 Preview containing support for DXR Raytracing on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

12-02-2019, 20:43:30

NeverBackDown
Considering they were probably working on this before MS announced this last March, it's been over a year for them to bring official support for this technology. So that should give perspective to people who bash software developers for being to slow to bring new tech to games, it takes time. Just like DX11 to DX12 is, not aimed at anyone here, but people I know are just so naive it hurts. They praise UE4/Epic so i'll be able to throw this in there faceQuote

12-02-2019, 21:08:59

AlienALX
Any transition from one API to another takes years. It's frustrating nonetheless, though.

DX12 is starting to settle now. Hopefully DX11 is being phased out now with any new dev being DX12 from the ground up.Quote

13-02-2019, 07:39:55

tgrech
Epic have been working on raytracing for far longer than that, they've been discussing raytracing years before UE4 released and they had raytracing demos alongside its release in 2014. Unreal Engine 4 was in development since 2003.
https://www.tomsguide.com/us/photore...ew-1915-3.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTt7AGIpV2I
Of course, DXR changes a lot of things but they've sttill had far more experience and spent far longer on the concept than most even huge dev teams.Quote

13-02-2019, 13:56:45

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
Epic have been working on raytracing for far longer than that, they've been discussing raytracing years before UE4 released and they had raytracing demos alongside its release in 2014. Unreal Engine 4 was in development since 2003.
https://www.tomsguide.com/us/photore...ew-1915-3.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTt7AGIpV2I
Of course, DXR changes a lot of things but they've sttill had far more experience and spent far longer on the concept than most even huge dev teams.
Well no because it was not related to DX12. Which was my point. Anybody who's paid attention knows they've been working on it for a while.Quote

13-02-2019, 15:14:16

tgrech
DXR has been in development for at least half a decade, they almost certainly knew it would come to DX12 around UE4's initial launch, which is why they were the first to showcase it.
It's took a year for it to get from an already mature state in-engine to one where they feel developers could start to consider using it meaningfully in games(Though it's still not in the stable branch).Quote
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