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Nvidia releases their FrameView app for free game performance analysis

An app that can do both power and performance benchmarking

Nvidia reveals their FrameView game performance utility

Nvidia releases their FrameView app for free game performance analysis

Game benchmarking is a difficult task, making the process of reviewing graphics cards and other PC hardware a challenging one. What games do we test, what scenes do we benchmark within those games, and what GPUs should we compare (X) graphics card with? There's a lot of thought that goes into game testing, and that's before we consider what tools to use while benchmarking. 

Nvidia has now thrown its hat into the ring with FrameView, a new performance analysis tool which aims to deliver both performance and power benchmarking capabilities, offering support for DirectX 9, 10, 11 and 12, OpenGL, Vulkan, and Universal Windows Platform (UWP) applications, enabling benchmarking for practically every game in the market. 

With this move, Nvidia is effectively offering the market its own flavour of PresentMon, an open source benchmarking utility which also acts as the basis of AMD's OCAT tool. The difference with FrameView is Nvidia's secret sauce, which adds power data into the mix to deliver power efficiency data, a factor which Nvidia believes will highlight one of the company's key advantages over its competition. 

To get its efficiency data, Nvidia's FrameView notes the reported power usage of your system's graphics card to judge efficiency, creating what will be the first stumbling block for PC hardware enthusiasts. Self-reported statistics are difficult to trust, especially when a "faulty" GPU BIOS or a "flawed" GPU driver could cheat the system to report favourable efficiency results. Even so, the tool should give end users a good indication of how much more efficient their new graphics card is, provided they are comparing upgrading to a new GPU from the same brand. 
 
Regardless of what way you look at FrameView, it ultimately brings more users to PresentMon and incentivises the tool's future development. This move will also give AMD plenty of reasons to continue working on OCAT, their competing performance analysis tool. 

Nvidia reveals their FrameView game performance utility


With FrameView, the frametimes of your games will be measured, both in terms of rendered frame rate and displayed frame rate, providing a full picture of a gamer's user experience. Average framerates are recorded alongside 90%, 95% and 99% frametimes, which will enable PC users to judge the framerate consistency of their games. 

When it comes to power, Nvidia offers a new metric called Performance Per Watt, which is calculated by dividing the user's framerate by the GPU power consumption. This results in a data point that is measured in Frames per Joule.  

Nvidia releases their FrameView app for free game performance analysis  

Ultimately, the usefulness of Nvidia's tool depends on how easy to use the tool is, the accuracy of the data it provides and how easily the data that's generated by the tool can be analysed and digested. 

FrameView can be used on all graphics cards, not just Nvidia hardware, which means that Radeon and Intel users will be able to utilise FrameView for benchmarking purposes. FrameView is available to download from Nvidia here

You can join the discussion on Nvidia's FrameView app for game benchmarking and power analysis on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

09-07-2019, 12:44:01

NeverBackDown
I actually like the Frames per Joule idea. That's a pretty unique thing I would say compared to other utilities.Quote

09-07-2019, 14:02:07

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
I actually like the Frames per Joule idea. That's a pretty unique thing I would say compared to other utilities.
The engineer in me likes how it isn't FPS per Watt because the second component cancels out.Quote

09-07-2019, 16:42:10

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
The engineer in me likes how it isn't FPS per Watt because the second component cancels out.
Yeah makes sense they knew what to call it... they got some of the best hardware engineers in the world
On a different note, I think it would be cool if you did some more engineer type articles if you are able to. More breakdowns of new microarchitectures and whatnot.Quote

09-07-2019, 17:40:37

tgrech
Inverse measures like Frames per Joule(And FPS) are usually avoided in engineering because it's really messy to try and use these inverse forms in calculations, they're mostly a marketing thing so that better things have higher numbers, if you wanted to for instance take an average of an array off FPS values to do it correctly you need to first inverse all the values then average the sum off the inverse's then inverse the result again, same with FpJ, so generally you'll use Frametimes for performance or Joules per Frame for energy efficiency up until the marketing material as these values are easier to throw around and more intuitive I'd say. This article explains the mentality in avoiding it well from when NVidia started using FpJ with Kepler marketing material http://fileadmin.cs.lth.se/graphics/...erfperwhat.pdfQuote

09-07-2019, 17:50:06

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Yeah makes sense they knew what to call it... they got some of the best hardware engineers in the world
On a different note, I think it would be cool if you did some more engineer type articles if you are able to. More breakdowns of new microarchitectures and whatnot.
My training is in Mechanical Engineering, not computer science. The problem is that I don't get access to a lot of the architecture info early.

Makes it difficult to do an architectural deep dive without being late to the party. TBH I love seeing how the architectures behind everything is shifting, but there are only a certain number of hours in the day and a lot of things that require my attention.Quote
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