'

3DMARK Port Royal DirectX Raytracing Benchmark to release in January 2019

The benchmark will be showcased this December

3DMARK Port Royal DirectX Raytracing Benchmark to release in January 2019

3DMARK Port Royal DirectX Raytracing Benchmark to release in January 2019

UL Benchmarks has officially revealed 3DMARK Port Royal, the world's first real-time ray tracing benchmark for PC, utilising Microsoft's new DirectX Raytracing (DXR) API to deliver high fidelity graphics which are impossible with standard rasterised graphics. 

This benchmark will make use of DXR powered reflections, shadows and a variety of other raytraced effects, running in real-time at a resolution of 1440p. To develop this tool UL Benchmarks has worked with AMD, Intel, Nvidia, and other leading technology companies to create this tool, working closely with Microsoft to create a first-class DXR implementation.   

While DXR acceleration is currently only available on Nvidia's RTX series graphics cards, UL Benchmarks remains hopeful that more graphics cards will release with DirectX Raytracing support in 2019. 

 

    Real-time ray tracing promises to bring new levels of realism to in-game graphics. Port Royal uses DirectX Raytracing to enhance reflections, shadows, and other effects that are difficult to achieve with traditional rendering techniques. As well as benchmarking performance, 3DMark Port Royal is a realistic and practical example of what to expect from ray tracing in upcoming games—ray tracing effects running in real-time at reasonable frame rates at 2560 × 1440 resolution.  

3DMARK Port Royal DirectX Raytracing Benchmark to release in January 2019  

3DMARK Port Royal will release sometime in January 2019, with UL Benchmarks confirming plans to showcase the benchmark at Galax' GOC event on December 8th, where the tool's pricing and final release date will be revealed. 

You can join the discussion on 3DMARK Port Royal on the OC3D Forums

«Prev 1 Next»

Most Recent Comments

29-11-2018, 10:44:44

Bagpuss
Quote:
ray tracing effects running in real-time at reasonable frame rates at 2560 × 1440 resolution.

This made me laugh...I think that's the first time I've ever seen the term 'reasonable framerates' used to describe a benchmark.


Talk about lowering expectations.Quote

29-11-2018, 11:33:31

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bagpuss View Post
This made me laugh...I think that's the first time I've ever seen the term 'reasonable framerates' used to describe a benchmark.


Talk about lowering expectations.
I remember watching some old benchmarks run on my first system, super low framerates etc.

I think the aim is to show what is possible on today's kit, rather than just make something stupidly demanding with the expectation that next-gen hardware will sort it out. Some customers would expect the benchmark to rum somewhat smoothly when using a recently released high-end GPU. Beyond that, there are those that will use this benchmark at events as a tech demo.

The long and short here is that designing it this way appeases their potential customers. They will no doubt release a 4K version of this at a later date when better GPUs are released.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.