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Intel reveals major leadership changes following 7nm fallout

Venkata (Murthy) Renduchintala, Intel's Chief Engineering Officer, will leave the company

Intel reveals major leadership changes following 7nm fallout

Intel reveals major leadership changes following 7nm fallout

A lot has changed for Intel this week, with its share prices tumbling, in the aftermath of the company's newly announced 7nm delays. The market's faith in Intel has been shaken to the core, and leadership changes are needed to bring Intel back from this unfavourable position. 

Intel has confirmed that its Chief Engineering Officer and President of their Technology, Systems Architecture and Client Group (TSCG), Dr Venkata (Murthy) Renduchintala, will be leaving the company on August 3rd. Furthermore, the TSCG will be separated into five teams, all of which will report directly to CEO Bob Swan. 

The first of these new groups is Technology Development, which will be led by Dr. Ann Kelleher. This group will pioneer Intel's work on its future 7nm and 5nm process technologies. Mike Mayberry, who was previously leading Technology Development, will consult and assist Kelleher until his retirement later this year. 

Raja Koduri, the former leader of AMD's Radeon Technologies Group, will continue as the head of Intel's Architecture, Software and Graphics group. Here, Raja will help drive Intel's architecture and software roadmaps, while continuing to develop dedicated/discrete graphics products for the company. 

Manufacturing Operations will be lead by Keyvan Esfarjani, who recently led manufacturing for Intel’s Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group (NSG). The role of this group will be to continue ramping new products and to increase new fab capacity for the company.

Josh Walden will lead Design Engineering, while Intel searches for a more permanent leader for this role. Walden will continue to lead Intel's Product Assurance and Security Group (IPAS). As of now, Intel is searching for a "permanent world-class leader" to lead their Design Engineering group. 

Like before, Dr. Randhir Thakur will lead Intel's Supply Chain group, reporting to Intel's CEO as Chief Supply Chain Officer. As competition within the x86 market continues to intensify, the role of Intel's supply chain will be more important than ever.    
 

The significance of these changes cannot be understated. A top-level executive has been forced our of Intel. Intel's failure to develop its 7nm process tech on time has placed the company behind its competitors and following the company's well-documented issues with 10nm, the blame for these issues had to go somewhere. 

While Intel's announcement does not mention 7nm or mention Murphy's departure aside from his leaving date, it is clear that today's announcement is nothing short of Intel pushing out the executive in charge of the company's current manufacturing woes. Now, Intel needs to find a new path to technological leadership, and for that Intel will likely need to go through more significant changes. 

Intel reveals major leadership changes following 7nm fallout  

You can join the discussion on Intel's latest leadership changes on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

28-07-2020, 03:16:21

Bagpuss
I wonder if any of these clever, obscenely overpaid suits will recognise the fact that all of Intel's current problems can be traced back to when they had no (serious) competition in the desktop space and they sat on their fat lazy arses, shovelling out pointless CPU revisions for 5yrs with no value to the consumer...Quote

28-07-2020, 03:19:43

Avet
That is why the are sacking those overpaid suts that sat on their lazy arses. There will probably be a few of them sent home but they will report only on the biggest slackers.Quote

28-07-2020, 04:41:57

WYP
Intel's problems stem from the company being controlled by financials and not engineering. They focused on diversification because there was no more market share to gain with x86.

Delays in 10nm didn't matter, it wasn't like there was any real competition. What? You want to do X to fix the node? That will cost a lot, it's best to just refine what we have and focus on 7nm, that will be easier and cheaper.

Instead of trying to innovate within their own market, Intel tried to diversify and kept buying up start-ups, practically all of which have been failures from the outside. Everything was fine and dandy so long as they made money and the share price kept rising.

Now Intel needs to rebuild its culture, it needs engineering leadership and enough paranoia to seriously be working to create the best processors and innovate beyond adding x performance to their CPUs per year.Quote

28-07-2020, 04:53:17

Warchild
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
Intel's problems stem from the company being controlled by financials and not engineering. They focused on diversification because there was no more market share to gain with x86.

Delays in 10nm didn't matter, it wasn't like there was any real competition. What? You want to do X to fix the node? That will cost a lot, it's best to just refine what we have and focus on 7nm, that will be easier and cheaper.

Instead of trying to innovate within their own market, Intel tried to diversify and kept buying up start-ups, practically all of which have been failures from the outside. Everything was fine and dandy so long as they made money and the share price kept rising.

Now Intel needs to rebuild its culture, it needs engineering leadership and enough paranoia to seriously be working to create the best processors and innovate beyond adding x performance to their CPUs per year.
They should give Jim Keller a shot at the top spot.Quote

28-07-2020, 08:21:58

dazbobaby
You can't really blame intel for their complacency, it is human nature after all.
But instead of growing fat and lazy, they really should have taken the new blood and injected some innovations, or at the very least consider their new ideas.


Jim at Adored TV has recently covered Intel's serious managerial problems and now to take intel back to top tier, is going to take monumental effort.

You could argue that Apple over the past 10 years were complacent, and on the face of it they were. In the background they were working hard to try new products, hence they are now back to ARM.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nsX9nUFIBc


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agxSclh27uoQuote
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