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G.Skill Launches Crazy 6-Channel DDR4 Trident-Z Memory Kits for Intel's Xeon W-3175 CPU

192GB of DDR4 over 12 modules!

G.Skill Launches Crazy 6-Channel DDR4 Trident-Z Memory Kits for Intel's Xeon W-3175 CPU

G.Skill Launches Crazy 6-Channel DDR4 Trident-Z Memory Kits for Intel's Xeon W-3175

Intel has released their colossal Xeon X-3175 processor, a CPU that offers 28 cores, 56 total threads and support for a staggering six memory channels over a total of twelve potential DIMM slots.  

With this mightly Xeon comes a new CPU platform, shipping on the Intel's LGA3647 socket. To enable overclocking, users also require custom motherboards such as the ASUS ROG Dominus Extreme, which ships with MSRP pricing of over $1000, thanks to the VRM and memory requirements of the platforms. 

Now that the need for hex-channel DDR4 memory had entered the mainstream mindset, G.Skill has stepped up to become the first manufacturer to provide bespoke memory kits that are designed specifically for the task, shipping under the company's Trident Z Royal branding. 

These kits will ship with six or twelve modules, with capacities that range from 48GB (6x8GB) to 192GB (12x16GB) while also offering speeds of 3200MHz, 3600MHz and 4000 MHz. All of these memory kits are validated on an ASUS ROG Dominus Extreme motherboard and an Intel Xeon W-3175X processor. 

  

G.Skill Launches Crazy 6-Channel DDR4 Trident-Z Memory Kits for Intel's Xeon W-3175 CPU  

In terms of raw transfer rate, G.Skill's latest offerings deliver transfer rates that extend way beyond what is possible on Intel's X299 platform, with their high-end 4000MHz 6-channel memory kits offering read bandwidths as high as 122GB/s.

All of G.Skill's Trident Z Royal memory kits are created using Samsung B-die memory ICs, which are designed to offer high performance levels while maintaining reasonable voltage requirements. The chart below lists all available configurations of G.Skill's Hex-channel Trident Z Royal memory kits.  

G.Skill Launches Crazy 6-Channel DDR4 Trident-Z Memory Kits for Intel's Xeon W-3175 CPU  

G.Skill's latest Trident Z Royal Hex-channel memory kits will be available through the company's network of distribution partners and retailers. 

You can join the discussion on G.Skill's Hex-channel  Trident Z Royal memory modules on the OC3D Forums.  

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Most Recent Comments

31-01-2019, 07:38:59

Peace
The need for hex-channel has entered the mainstream mindset?! Uwotm8?


Imho, not even quad-channel is anywhere near the mainstream market. By mainstream I'm referring to the usual gamer like me, who likes high FPS and doesn't do video editing. But even with streaming and doing video stuff, is quad-channel really offering any real performance increase?Quote

31-01-2019, 07:52:37

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peace Ð View Post
The need for hex-channel has entered the mainstream mindset?! Uwotm8?


Imho, not even quad-channel is anywhere near the mainstream market. By mainstream I'm referring to the usual gamer like me, who likes high FPS and doesn't do video editing. But even with streaming and doing video stuff, is quad-channel really offering any real performance increase?
It depends on your interpretation of mainstream. In this case, I mean a processor that sits inside Intel's "desktop" product ecosystem. IE, not intended as a server product.

For example, one could say that the RTX 2080 Ti is a mainstream version of the Quadro RTX 6000.

Perhaps things could have been worded better, but mainstream doesn't necessarily need to be equated to affordable or gaming when it comes to the PC market.

As for potential performance increases, it depends on how much your workloads enjoy memory bandwidth.Quote

31-01-2019, 08:07:30

Peace
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
It depends on your interpretation of mainstream. In this case, I mean a processor that sits inside Intel's "desktop" product ecosystem. IE, not intended as a server product.

For example, one could say that the RTX 2080 Ti is a mainstream version of the Quadro RTX 6000.

Perhaps things could have been worked better, but mainstream doesn't necessarily need to be equated to affordable or gaming when it comes to the PC market.

As for potential performance increases, it depends on how much your workloads enjoy memory bandwidth.
Okay, if you put it this way, it makes much more sense. For me, Xeons will always be for workstations and servers, argh.Quote
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