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Synopsys conducts the worlds first USB 3.2 demo

Steady speeds of 1.6GBps

Synopsys conducts the worlds first USB 3.2 demo

Synopsys conducts the worlds first USB 3.2 demo

Back in September 2017, the USB 3.2 standard was published by USB-IF, the USB Implementers Forum, offering a 2x performance increase over USB 3.1 Gen2. 

The standard offers increased transfer speeds by making use of the reversible nature of USB 3.1 Type-C, using multi-lane operation to support both of the cable's data lanes. This change allows USB 3.2 to be supported on existing USB 3.1 Type-C data cables. 

The process towards the adoption of any new USB standard is slow, with years passing before USB 3.1 became available in devices after the standard's release. USB 3.2 is expected to take a similarly long time to become available to consumers.  

Synopsys has taken the industry's first significant step towards USB 3.2 adoption, conducting the world's first USB 3.2 demo, using an FPGA to act as a storage medium while using a standard USB 3.1 cable to transfer a data stream of 1.6GB per second to a connected Windows 10 PC. A video which showcases this hardware demo is available below. 



At this time Synopsys has not stated when companies will be able to licence their implementation of USB 3.2 or when USB 3.2 devices will become available to consumers.

Today most USB devices cannot make full use of the performance offered by USB 3.1, making USB 3.2 seem redundant in the eyes of some consumers. Even so, USB 3.2 remains 2x slower than Thunderbolt 3, which offers enough bandwidth to be used as an external GPU connection standard. 

You can join the discussion on Synopsys' USB 3.2 demo on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

27-05-2018, 20:07:28

Emu
At one stage people considered gigabit ethernet to be redundant because most PCs at the time couldn't handle actually transmitting or recieving that much data - not to mention that until PCIe became more ubiquitous, gigabit ethernet adaptors were connected via PCI which only had 533mbit worth of data bandwidth.Quote

28-05-2018, 05:32:24

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emu View Post
At one stage people considered gigabit ethernet to be redundant because most PCs at the time couldn't handle actually transmitting or recieving that much data - not to mention that until PCIe became more ubiquitous, gigabit ethernet adaptors were connected via PCI which only had 533mbit worth of data bandwidth.
The march of progress continues, though it is strange to think that Thunderbolt 3 is already 2x faster than USB 3.2. Thunderbolt 3 is fast enough to enable external GPUs, it will be interesting to see what will be possible using future iterations of the standard.Quote

28-05-2018, 12:53:32

NeverBackDown
Honestly I do not know why we aren't using Thunderbolt. It's so much faster.

It's the same thing with DisplayPort and HDMI. DP is far faster and does everything HDMI does. Yet we are using HDMI for everything..Quote

28-05-2018, 13:20:00

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Honestly I do not know why we aren't using Thunderbolt. It's so much faster.

It's the same thing with DisplayPort and HDMI. DP is far faster and does everything HDMI does. Yet we are using HDMI for everything..
The main problem is that Thunderbolt 3 is basically a 4x PCIe 3.0 connection, tonnes of bandwidth to connect to a system. PCs these days can be very I/O limited, so several Thunderbolt ports would be too much for most systems.

The other problem with Thunderbolt is Intel, as the standard had royalties associated with it until May 2017.

As far as HDMI and DP go, I think HDMI has a lead now with HDMI 2.1, with variable refresh rates and several other features as standard. DisplayPort also has its issues, as HDMI can typically support longer length cables without signal loss.

DisplayPort and Thunderbolt also have to deal with the fact that USB and HDMI are stupidly common and people want backwards compatibility. Though this is arguably why Intel uses the USB Type-C connector for Thunderbolt.Quote
Reply
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