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Powercolor shows off RX Vega Nano design at Ryzen 2000 event

Will the RX Vega Nano release in 2018?

Powercolor shows off RX Vega Nano design at Ryzen 2000 event

Powercolor shows off RX Vega Nano design at Ryzen 2000 event

Back in SIGGRAPH 2017, AMD showcased their RX Vega Nano to select members of the press, a small form factor version of AMD's Radeon Vega GPU that is tuned to run at a low TDP. 

So far this GPU has never seen a consumer release, with the mining boom consuming every RX Vega series GPU that AMD could manufacture, moving Radeon's RX Vega Nano onto the back burner. Why create a new Vega SKU when you can already sell every chip you can produce, especially when you consider that a small form factor variant would command a lower overall price tag. 

PCgameshardware has found what appears to be a reference RX Vega Nano design at AMD's Ryzen 2000 series pre-launch event in Munich, a Powercolor model with an overall design that is similar to the RX Vega Nano that Chris Hook showcased back in 2017.   

Powercolor shows off RX Vega Nano design at Ryzen 2000 event

 

Those who are familiar with AMD's other RX Vega GPUs will immediately notice that similarity between the PCB of the RX Vega NANO and several aftermarket RX Vega 64/56 PCB designs, closely matching models which make use of shortened PCBs, an indication that this is an AMD reference PCB design.

The RX Vega Nano uses an 8+6-pin power configuration, instead of the 8+8-pin design used by RX Vega 64/56 series graphics cards, though the PCB offers space for a higher-end power configuration. This PCB design makes this motherboard design suitable for several RX Vega class GPUs, ranging from the NANO to the RX Vega 64; provided manufacturers supply end users with a capable cooling solution.   

  
Powercolor shows off RX Vega Nano design at Ryzen 2000 event  

At this time it remains unclear if AMD's RX Vega Nano will ever reach the consumer market, either as an official AMD reference product or as an unofficial AIB  partner design. According to PCgameshardware, this model features 56 active Vega CUs with a power profile which is designed to offer higher levels of performance per watt, allowing the GPU to remain cool and quiet with such a small heatsink. 

You can join the discussion on Powercolor's RX Vega Nano GPU on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

19-04-2018, 22:32:30

CRITICALThinker
I have always wondered if the approach of tuning a large amount of cores to fit within a low power window would be comparable tuning a lesser amount to the same window, or if diminishing returns scales both ways (there really is only one efficiency region for a design)Quote

20-04-2018, 04:13:30

Warchild
Can that thing look any more cheaply made :O

Also I can see a sticker has been applied to the exhaust part of the block which surprise, surprise has lost its adhesion and is peeling off. I know this can't be the final product, but surely they can do better.Quote

20-04-2018, 08:17:44

tgrech
Quote:
Originally Posted by CRITICALThinker View Post
I have always wondered if the approach of tuning a large amount of cores to fit within a low power window would be comparable tuning a lesser amount to the same window, or if diminishing returns scales both ways (there really is only one efficiency region for a design)
Depends on the architecture, process, and even batch. Many designs have peak perf/watt at much lower clocks than their peak clock, making larger lower clocked designs desirable in many mobile designs, however some chips on a given wafer or even cores on a given chip can have defects that alter their clock/power curves, more enabled cores increases the likelihood of this, making these chips quite rare on less mature nodes.

The Fury Nano was a fully-enabled core, mostly just a Fury X with a tweaked clock curve and better-binned dies for lower power consumption. That was on a super-mature 28nm node though.Quote
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