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Oculus Reveals their New Rift S VR Headset

More pixels, a comfort-oriented design and reduced 'screen-door' effect

Oculus Reveals their New Rift S VR Headset

Oculus Reveals their New Rift S VR Headset

Oculus has finally revealed their new Rift S VR headset, a next-generation VR offering that is designed to be more comfortable, easier to set up and offer a higher-fidelity experience than the company's existing Rift headset.  

In Spring 2019, the Rift S will be released into the wild, offering inside-out tracking though five well-positioned cameras, a higher resolution screen, enhanced optics that are designed to reduce the "screen-door" effect and a new strap design that is comfort-oriented. 

The Rift S is a new PC-oriented headset from Oculus, packing support for existing Rift titles while offering new Oculus Touch controllers that provide a design that is similar to what will be used with the Oculus Quest. The headset will cost $399 in the US, with worldwide pricing being unknown. 

Specs-wise, the Oculus Rift S is both an upgrade and a downgrade over its predecessor, packing an 80Hz screen that offers a resolution of 1280x1440 per eye and a total resolution of 2560x1440. This means that the Oculus Rift S provides a resolution and optics upgrade, while also delivering a small refresh rate downgrade from 90Hz to 80Hz. GDC attendees have confirmed these specifications. 

To create their new headset, Oculus teamed up with Lenovo, who was previously working on a SteamVR powered headset, to assist them in creating a more comfortable headset design. In some regards, the new Oculus look s lot like Sony's PlayStation VR headset, which is renowned for being more comfortable than the original Rift and the HTC Vive. 

 

To offer effective inside-out tracking, Oculus has mounted five cameras on their Rift S headset, with two looking forwards, one facing each side at a downward angle and one looking up. This will facilitate accurate controller tracking in most locations, though there will be a blind spot behind the gamer. 

This same blind spot is seen on the Original Rift headset, which used two external cameras for tracking. A third camera was required to provide accurate tracking in all directions, but only when properly set up. 

Outside of the upgraded screen resolution, the biggest change to the Rift S is the new tracking system which will make the new headset much easier to set up and use than its predecessor. 

The Oculus Rift S will release in Spring 2019 for $399 in the US. 

You can join the discussion on the Oculus Rift S on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

20-03-2019, 12:28:23

Daiyus
This looks like a very nice step up from the original Oculus Rift. I still don't think I'll be getting VR any time soon but this does make me feel a bit more excited about the prospect of owning a headset one day.

For me I think I'd get more benefit from upgrading from a 28" 2160p panel to a 34" 1440p Ultra-Wide panel before going for VR. The only game I can imagine myself playing with VR right now is Elite Dangerous, which would be mind blowing, but it's still a massive investment for one game.Quote

20-03-2019, 12:42:49

tgrech
Yeah a step in the right direction, I guess with async time warp and similar techniques and all the render path latency improvements nowadays that 10Hz doesn't make much difference, and maybe making it 10% easier to get a locked max framerate was more worthwhile. I've never actually used VR headsets for gaming outside of weird academic experiments I used to agree to for some beer money at uni but now I at least know it doesn't make me sick(Even when it seemed the weird stuff being thrown at my vision based on my biometrics in some of those weird "games" these academics would make was specifically designed to do so) and given most of my gaming is driving/flight simulator kinda games I think it'd be my next upgrade before a new monitor, though I'd need a new GPU with it/first so that's on the back burner for abit.Quote

20-03-2019, 12:59:47

Bartacus
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daiyus View Post
For me I think I'd get more benefit from upgrading from a 28" 2160p panel to a 34" 1440p Ultra-Wide panel before going for VR. The only game I can imagine myself playing with VR right now is Elite Dangerous, which would be mind blowing, but it's still a massive investment for one game.
I made that very same upgrade / side-grade, but I went 35" curved (AOC). Well worth it. I have a Rift, but I never use the thing. I always told myself I would once I mastered Elite Dangerous controls and could fly blind, but I got sick of ED before that happened, LOL!

Big screen is a better path for sure. VR is great for the odd niche title, if you have the cash and the system. But for everyday gaming it's not there yet, and I doubt it ever will be. VR is one of those things that could be niche forever.Quote

21-03-2019, 02:35:56

Damien c
This might be something I look at, at some point after I sell my current rift as I have no space for it because of the sensors.

This would also probably get me back in to playing Elite.Quote

21-03-2019, 06:12:34

Warchild
Reduction on SDE is the biggest feature for me on any VR. The company that eliminates that will have the best visual regardless of resolution.Quote
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