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Nvidia next-gen GPUs are likely to use Samsung's 7nm EUV node

It looks like Nvidia won't be tapping TSMC for the next-gen designs

Nvidia next-gen GPUs are likely to use Samsung's 7nm EUV node

Nvidia next-gen GPUs are likely to use Samsung's 7nm EUV node

It is starting to look increasingly likely that we won't be seeing any 7nm graphics chips from Nvidia in 2019, at least on the consumer side, with reports coming in that the GPU giant will be a launch partner for Samsung's planned 7nm EUV node, placing the launch of Nvidia's post Turing graphics cards in a 2020 timeframe. 

What differentiates Samsung's 7nm EUV node from TSMC's current 7nm node is its utilisation of EUV (Extreme Ultra Violet) technology, which TSMC plans to implement in their 7nm+ process. In simple terms, EUV lithography uses light with a much smaller wavelength to help offer more precise details into silicon, making chip production more accurate while allowing smaller process nodes to be created. 

Moving to a newer process node offers several benefits, from the ability to pack more transistors and features into small chip designs to increased performance and power efficiency characteristics. This change alone should allow Nvidia's next-generation products to outperform Turing, even without major tweaks to their underlying GPU architecture.  

While Nvidia has primarily used TSMC for the past few product generations, the company is no stranger to Samsung's process tech. Nvidia's GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti are both based on Samsung's 14nm silicon, Samsung's low power GT 1030 also uses Samsung lithography. 

Nvidia next-gen GPUs are likely to use Samsung's 7nm EUV node  

With Turing being a relatively new addition to Nvidia's GPU lineup, it is unlikely that the company plans to replace their RTX 20 series anytime soon, especially given their imminent release plans for their RTX 2060 graphics card and their RTX mobility lineup.

You can join the discussion on Nvidia's next-gen graphics cards reportedly using Samsung's 7nm EUV process node on the OC3D Forums.  

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Most Recent Comments

05-01-2019, 10:32:19

TheF34RChannel
I sincerely hope that they will bring out (an affordable) refresh in 7nm this year - doing another year with a 1080 is not something that I can do.

Otherwise, good thing they're going with Samsung!Quote

05-01-2019, 11:02:10

tgrech
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheF34RChannel View Post
I sincerely hope that they will bring out (an affordable) refresh in 7nm this year - doing another year with a 1080 is not something that I can do.

Otherwise, good thing they're going with Samsung!
Well, it certainly seems like there's at least one company with an afford 7nm refresh coming this year at least, assuming the rumours of Navi coming in two or more die sizes are true.Quote

05-01-2019, 11:25:32

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
Well, it certainly seems like there's at least one company with an afford 7nm refresh coming this year at least, assuming the rumours of Navi coming in two or more die sizes are true.
I don't see multi-die Navi being a thing this gen. At least for the gaming market. Gaming is super latency sensitive, so multi-die communication can be a big problem.

On the compute side, for datacenters and workstations, it could work very well though, as they don't care as much about those factors, just that the work gets done.Quote

05-01-2019, 12:14:22

tgrech
Quote:
Originally Posted by WYP View Post
I don't see multi-die Navi being a thing this gen. At least for the gaming market. Gaming is super latency sensitive, so multi-die communication can be a big problem.

On the compute side, for datacenters and workstations, it could work very well though, as they don't care as much about those factors, just that the work gets done.
I meant as in Navi coming in at least a small and large die version, the rumoured Navi 10/20 and Navi 12 iirc. We've long heard Navi would be a mainstream competitor, but recent comments from AMD suggest it will also target NVidia's higher end cards too(Though presumably not top end for now). I guess a ~40CU then a ~64CU version would make the most sense first for mainstream performance/Polaris 10 & high end/Vega replacements(Especially given yields will be spottier with first gen 7nm, so they could possibly use 3 distinct bins per die across these segments to make the best use of all the silicon, say 64/56/48 and 40/32/24 CU versions, which would cover more or less their whole desktop stack), with a smaller one(~16CU) maybe coming abit later to replace Polaris 11 low bin & 12 and some applications of Vega M's lower bins, I wouldn't rule out it being used for Ryzen4000G too if multi-die Ryzen comes to consumer platforms this year. (Maybe the order those launches in will play out differently though depending on which rumours & AMD talk applies to when)Quote

05-01-2019, 13:28:28

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheF34RChannel View Post
I sincerely hope that they will bring out (an affordable) refresh in 7nm this year - doing another year with a 1080 is not something that I can do.

Otherwise, good thing they're going with Samsung!
Can't do with a 1080? It's like the perfect card for 1440p lol
Unless you want much higher fpsQuote
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