'

AMD admits they have "lost momentum" in gaming - promises yearly GPU releases

AMD spent too much energy 'chasing AI'

AMD admits they have

AMD admits they have "lost momentum" in gaming - promises yearly GPU releases

The computer graphics market is not very competitive these days, so much so that Nvidia has been able to maintain a performance and power efficiency lead over AMD without releasing a new gaming graphics architecture for over two years. 

At Computex, there were no new gaming graphics cards announcements, with Nvidia stating that their next Geforce series of graphics cards will release "a long time from now" while AMD's only gaming announcement was the release of Powercolor's RX Vega 56 Nano

PC World's Mark Hachman has reported that AMD plans to release new gaming graphics cards every year moving forward, hoping to inject some excitement into the industry with new architectures, process node shrinks/adjustments and “maybe incremental architecture changes.”

David Wang, senior vice president of Engineering at AMD's Radeon Technologies Group, has been reported as saying that “AMD had lost momentum” in the consumer enthusiast market and that the company was "spending all our energy in chasing AI."

Ironically, AMD's most exciting graphics card announcement was for Radeon's Vega Instinct 7nm graphics card, a graphics card that is designed for AI/Deep Learning workloads, though AMD's Lisa Su did promise that 7nm graphics cards will be coming to gamers. 
  

At this time, it is unknown whether or not AMD can deliver 7nm gaming graphics cards before Nvidia can release their next Geforce series of graphics cards. Even if they do, AMD will be fighting an uphill battle against Nvidia to gain GPU market share, as Nvidia's dominance will has made it increasingly difficult to get game developers to take Radeon seriously. 

  

AMD admits they have  

Thanks to the introduction of 7nm process nodes, both AMD and Nvidia have a tremendous opportunity to offer increased clock speeds and greater energy efficiency with their next-generation graphics cards, hopefully allowing both companies to deliver a sizable generational leap in performance when moving away from Pascal and Vega. 

We hope that AMD can regain some of their last ground in the gaming market, as a competitive marketplace will always breed more hardware and software innovation. We have already seen this occur in the CPU market thanks to the introduction of AMD's Ryzen architecture, making the prospect of a similar situation in the GPU market incredibly appealing. 

You can join the discussion on AMD's plans to release a new series of gaming GPUs every year on the OC3D Forums.

«Prev 1 Next»

Most Recent Comments

08-06-2018, 06:40:59

AngryGoldfish
It is great to see AMD admit their gaming GPUs are severely lacking. Polaris is almost two years old now and has no sign of being replaced at the two-year mark, and Vega is a hot mess. GPUs are so boring right now. I know there's usually an ebb and flow in engineering and computing, but GPUs have been dull for many, many months now. We've seen a one or two semi-exciting advancements—Volta offered amazing DX12-specific performance (but at an astronomical price and little uplift in DX11), and prices finally calmed down after the mining storm—but in general it's been years since GPUs have excited me. The GTX 1080 drew less power than a GTX 980, but outpaced it significantly while offering massive clock increases and a semi-new memory design. That's the last time I thought, 'Wow, that's cool.' Vega had lots of cool features, but it ended up being that drummer that turns up to a concert with this huge rack of toms, double kick drums, and an array of hand-hammered Turkish cymbals, to only just be able to manage a basic 4/4 beat. It could play 11/16 timing pretty damn well, but only one track in the setlist required it.Quote

08-06-2018, 11:13:53

Giggyolly
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngryGoldfish View Post
It is great to see AMD admit their gaming GPUs are severely lacking. Polaris is almost two years old now and has no sign of being replaced at the two-year mark, and Vega is a hot mess. GPUs are so boring right now. I know there's usually an ebb and flow in engineering and computing, but GPUs have been dull for many, many months now. We've seen a one or two semi-exciting advancements—Volta offered amazing DX12-specific performance (but at an astronomical price and little uplift in DX11), and prices finally calmed down after the mining storm—but in general it's been years since GPUs have excited me. The GTX 1080 drew less power than a GTX 980, but outpaced it significantly while offering massive clock increases and a semi-new memory design. That's the last time I thought, 'Wow, that's cool.' Vega had lots of cool features, but it ended up being that drummer that turns up to a concert with this huge rack of toms, double kick drums, and an array of hand-hammered Turkish cymbals, to only just be able to manage a basic 4/4 beat. It could play 11/16 timing pretty damn well, but only one track in the setlist required it.
LOL at that analogy!

But yes agreed, there is clearly issues with their graphics development. I mean considering the best they could do with Polaris is the 580 shows that the architecture probably didn't pan out as intended..
And Vega in my opinion is what the Fury X should have been, considering the size of that Die.
It's clear they need to get off GCN to move forwards with an entirely new architecture.
Maybe separate their gaming from their compute, as compute performance obviously doesn't help the efficiency on Vega.Quote

08-06-2018, 15:13:39

AngryGoldfish
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giggyolly View Post
LOL at that analogy!

But yes agreed, there is clearly issues with their graphics development. I mean considering the best they could do with Polaris is the 580 shows that the architecture probably didn't pan out as intended..
And Vega in my opinion is what the Fury X should have been, considering the size of that Die.
It's clear they need to get off GCN to move forwards with an entirely new architecture.
Maybe separate their gaming from their compute, as compute performance obviously doesn't help the efficiency on Vega.
The RX 580 is a solid card for most and a great card for those who play DX12 games, but it's not especially efficient once AMD and their board partners add a slight overclock, and it has been on the shelf for too long without sign of relief.

Yeah, GCN definitely seems like it's holding them back. I also think HBM and DX12 has held them back as well. And I also agree that they need to segment their line. I feel like I've been offered sloppy seconds, like a rally driver being given a formula car. Yeah, it's fast as fudge and highly engineered, but it's not what most of us need.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.