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Intel's 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000

That's a lot of cores for a lot more money...

Intel's 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000

Intel's 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000 

During their "Fall Desktop Launch Event", Intel unveiled their XEON W-3175X processor, an unlocked 28-core processor which offers support for 6-channel DDR4 memory and clock speeds of up to 4.3GHz out of the box. Now, this processor has been listed online, with the retailer Kikatek giving it a price tag of £4,045.96 and an RRP of £5,999. 

Unlike other Xeon processors, Intel plans to make their W-3175X processor with support for overclocking, while also offering support ECC memory and other Xeon-grade features. Intel has confirmed that this CPU provides a base clock speed of 3.1GHz and a dual-core boost clock speed of 4.3GHz. The TDP of this processor is 255W.

To house these processors, Intel's 28-core Xeon requires motherboards that are both server-grade and overclocking-ready. On this front, Intel has partnered with both ASUS and Gigabyte to offer mainboards that are capable of running these new processors at higher clock speeds to deliver industry-leading performance.

Intel has already announced plans to release their new Xeon W-3175X this December alongside supported motherboards from ASUS and Gigabyte. At this time Intel has not revealed this CPU's release date, with the company rapidly running out of December to launch their new flagship overclocker

  

Intel's 28-core Xeon W-3175X listed for £4000  

One thing to note about the W-3175X processor is that it is not Soldered and uses the same polymer-based thermal paste as other Xeon processors.

The reason behind Intel's decision to use polymer-based TIM is clear, as no other product in their LGA3647 product stack uses STIM (Soldered Thermal Interface Material), making its use unfeasible for a low-volume product like the Xeon W-3175X. Even so, this design decision makes it likely that pro overclockers will need likely need to delid their W-3175X processors to achieve peak performance, which something that nobody should have to do on a processor that will be worth multiple thousand dollars.

You can join the discussion on Intel's unlocked 28-Core Xeon Processor and its early price listing on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

17-12-2018, 08:12:53

Avet
Ouch...Quote

17-12-2018, 08:31:53

Eddie long
I am not surprised at that priceQuote

17-12-2018, 09:22:57

Warchild
Can someone explain to me why corporate and industrial use would require overclocking?

1. it reduces longevity
2. it produces chances of instability

Imagine housing a server for banking or data ID verification, and your CPU has difficulties at a higher than necessary clock speed, thus crashing. Automatic or not, I dont see the need.

Throw in the fact that this increases consumption, something of which business would conscious about.Quote

17-12-2018, 09:47:23

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warchild View Post
Can someone explain to me why corporate and industrial use would require overclocking?

1. it reduces longevity
2. it produces chances of instability

Imagine housing a server for banking or data ID verification, and your CPU has difficulties at a higher than necessary clock speed, thus crashing. Automatic or not, I dont see the need.

Throw in the fact that this increases consumption, something of which business would conscious about.
Intel are muddling this CPU up with gaming CPUs. I mean, I can see why you would want to overclock a workstation (to get encodes etc done faster) but like you say it won't happen in server world.

Intel just seem to be very, very dazed and confused after the Ryzen bomb dropped. I think they genuinely weren't expecting it to do anything at all.Quote

17-12-2018, 10:02:50

demonking
I agree, I don't think intel know what to do with this. As we have seen with threadripper, to many threads and gaming performance falls off a cliff so this is not a gaming chip and overclocking on server platforms is like running a butchers stand at a vegan event, though im sure these would fly in servers, whilst they last. They justify the price by calling it a Xeon, this is simply a show of force to assure investors that they are not falling behind... even though anyone with real tech knowledge knows intel are pooing themselves right now, especially with the next version of EPYC round the corner and then Zen to followQuote
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