'

Intel Rocket Lake CPU details leak - A Comet Lake Refresh is coming?

An 8-core 12-thread processor?

Intel Rocket Lake CPU details leak - A Comet Lake Refresh is coming?

Intel Rocket Lake CPU details leak - A Comet Lake Refresh is coming?

Intel has big plans for its next-generation of Core processors, desktop-grade processors which will deliver the company's first true architectural leap since Skylake. This new series of processors is due to offer users increased performance per clock and what could be a transformative leap in single-threaded performance. 

Videocardz has leaked a slide which details Intel's upcoming Rocket Lake processors, revealing not just the company's planned Rocket Lake core/thread counts but also the company's plans to release a "Comet Lake-S Refresh" for i3 and below processors. If this slide is legitimate, Rocket Lake is an architecture that's only for high-end users. 

Several older rumour sources have already claimed that Rocket Lake will deliver desktop users up to eight cores and sixteen threads, which is two cores and four-threads fewer than today's Comet Lake processors. To counter this reduction in core count, Intel will be relying on increased single-threaded performance to deliver a generational leap in system performance, boosting overall system performance through single-threaded performance gains. 

Intel's Skylake series of desktop processors released in 2015, with Kaby Lake, Coffee Lake, Coffee Lake-R (Refresh) and now Comet Lake series processors utilising the same baseline CPU architecture. With Rocket Lake, Intel has the opportunity to showcase the power of an entirely new CPU architecture, and after five years of waiting, the CPU market needs to see a huge performance leap. 

Strangely, Intel's i7-grade Rocket Lake processors have been listed as offering eight cores and twelve threads. This means one of three things; that Intel will start using uneven Hyperthreading configurations, that the CPU as only six cores (the slide has a typo), or the processor will feature eight cores and sixteen threads (like the i9) and differentiate itself from the i9 lineup with lower clock speeds or other downgrades. 

With the processor being listed with "16M" of what appears to be cache, it is probable that Intel plans to over uneven hyperthreading, which is a first for the company. Right now, a similar feature is available with Comet Lake, though consumers have little reason to disable hyperthreading on any their Comet Lake CPU cores.  

Another factor that's worth noting is that the slide below details vPro series processors, which could have different configurations to non-vPro processors, though this is unlikely. 

   

Intel Rocket Lake CPU details leak - A Comet Lake Refresh is coming?  

 
Intel's Rocket Lake processors are due to deliver PCIe 4.0 support to Intel-based systems, finally catching up to what AMD's Ryzen 3rd Generation processors accomplished back in mid-2019. Rocket Lake should also bring Thunderbolt 4 support to desktop platforms, something which Intel will push as a key advantage to their product stack. 

At this time, it is unknown when Rocket Lake will launch, though you can bet that Intel will release these processors as soon as they are able, as leading single-threaded performance will help Intel to recapture the enthusiast market, even if AMD can deliver higher core counts. Not all applications are highly multi-threaded, making single-threaded performance leadership critical for many workloads. 

You can join the discussion on Intel's Rocket Lake processors on the OC3D Forums.  

«Prev 1 Next»

Most Recent Comments

09-07-2020, 14:13:39

NeverBackDown
Is Rocket Lake for Desktop? I thought the first new architecture was Sunny Cove or is that Mobile only? It's getting confusing to keep up

If that's the case why are Intel fragmenting their product lineup? Worse than AMD now(where mobile is behind as are APUs).Quote

09-07-2020, 16:36:44

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeverBackDown View Post
Is Rocket Lake for Desktop? I thought the first new architecture was Sunny Cove or is that Mobile only? It's getting confusing to keep up

If that's the case why are Intel fragmenting their product lineup? Worse than AMD now(where mobile is behind as are APUs).
Intel's core names and product names are different now. Tiger Lake is using Willow Cove cores and Ice Lake users Sunny Cove cores etc etc.

TBH, it is uncertain what cores Rocket Lake is using, though it is expected to be 14nm due to the low core count. Transistors per core go up with the complexity, and that could be why the core counts are going down with Rocket Lake.

Hard to know. Nothing is confirmed ATM.Quote

10-07-2020, 04:09:26

Avet
Everything about future Intel releases is very vague and knowing Intel it will probably change. This is what I have been able to patch up from everywhere.

Rocket Lake-S is a 14nm backport of 10nm Willow Cove architecture used in Tiger Lake. It will be on LGA 1200. It should support PCI-E Gen 4 but it is not certain. Release probably early 2021.

10nm++ Alder Lake-S will sport up to 16 cores in a big.LITTLE-esque cluster of Golden Cove and Gracemont cores based on information available now. It will be on LGA 1700 which should last for at least 3 CPU generations (as a response on AMDs long therm socket support). Definite PCI-E Gen 4 support. Intel should be introducing DDR5 with this generation. Release in late 2021, early 2022.

Ice Lake-SP will be the next-gen of Intel's Server processors. 10nm+, Sunny Cove architecture, Socket W LGA-4189, PCI-E Gen 4, 3200 MT/s 8-Channel Memory. And the next Ice Lake-X will be derived from those for HEDT platform. Release sometime in 2021.Quote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.