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Intel retires Kaby Lake-X less than a year after its release

Kaby Lake-X will reach end of life on May 7th

Intel retires Kaby Lake-X less than a year after its release

Intel retires Kaby Lake-X less than a year after its release

When Kaby Lake-X launched alongside Skylake-X, the PC community was understandably baffled. Why would Intel release a quad-core CPUs on X299? The i5 7640X (four cores, four threads) and i7 7740X (four cores, eight threads) were nothing more than their Kaby Lake i5 7600K and i7 7700K with clock speed boosts and compatibility with the company's X299 socket. 

The longer you look at Kaby Lake-X, the more the processor's shortcomings stood out, lacking support for the additional PCIe lanes on X299 motherboards or more than two of X299's four memory channels, forcing purchasers to buy more expensive motherboards for a feature set that mostly unusable. 

If you wanted a quad-core, Kaby Lake on a Z270 motherboard was a much better purchase, and if you wanted more than that, you could go for a 6-core or higher on X299, giving Kaby Lake-X no clear position in the CPU market. It is hard to find a situation where anyone would recommend Kaby Lake-X over Intel's other CPU offerings.    

Intel has confirmed that Kaby Lake-X will enter EOL (End of Life) status on May 7th, less than a year after the product's launch. With the release of Coffee Lake, the market position of Kaby Lake-X has been undermined further, making Intel's 6-core processors a much better purchase for high-performance users. 

  

Intel retires Kaby Lake-X less than a year after its release

  Intel retires Kaby Lake-X less than a year after its release

  
The biggest mystery behind Kaby Lake-X is who at Intel thought that the product was a good idea, especially with 6-core Coffee Lake processors on the horizon. It seems like Intel has finally gotten the message and has realised that Kaby Lake-X had no market to exploit, with lower-end Z270 motherboards and processors offering the same features while the feature set of X299 remained mostly unused by the product. 

You can join the discussion on Intel's Kaby Lake-X entering end-of-life status on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

01-05-2018, 15:16:38

TheF34RChannel
No who saw that coming!Quote

02-05-2018, 04:09:40

AlienALX
In out, in out, wipe it on a tea towel.Quote

02-05-2018, 20:22:47

Avet
I would like to know how many did they sell (if any). And i don't mean in pre-built systems, when you go and pick whole case from the shelf. How many people said "I want that CPU" and bought it.Quote

03-05-2018, 03:46:40

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avet View Post
I would like to know how many did they sell (if any). And i don't mean in pre-built systems, when you go and pick whole case from the shelf. How many people said "I want that CPU" and bought it.
"Today I will buy an over priced chip on an over priced board, most of which I won't be able to use properly".

Not many..Quote

04-05-2018, 13:36:13

AngryGoldfish
There HAD to have been a sound reason for doing this in the first place. Do companies worth billions really make such stupid mistakes? I don't know whether that's a rhetorical question or not.Quote
Reply
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