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Intel Launches their Xeon E series of Coffee Lake processors

Specifications and similarities and differences to Intel's 8th Generation consumer products

Intel Launches their 8th Generation of Xeon E processors

Specifications and similarities to the consumer 8000-series and H370 

When looking at Intel's new Xeon-E series of processors, the Coffee Lake comparison is obvious, offering the same core counts and thread counts as Intel's latest 8th generation consumer processors, at least on the high-end. 

Like previous-generation Xeon processor, Intel promises increased reliability and support for ECC DDR4 memory with speeds of up to 2666MHz, attributes that make these products useful for professional-grade workstations and other stability focused systems. Intel is not offering support for overclocking with their Xeon-E series of processors, which makes sense given their focus on stability with this new product lineup.   
 

Intel Launches their 8th Generation of Xeon E processors


Below are the specifications of Intel's new Xeon E series of processors, delivering up to six cores, twelve threads and support for up to 64GB of 2666MHz ECC DDR4 memory. Like Intel's 8000-series of desktop processors, Intel is continuing to use their LGA 1151 socket, though the company is moving to their new C246 chipset. 

Much like Intel's new H370 chipset on the desktop side, the new C246 chipset offers support for USB 3.1 Gen 2 in silicon and integrated support for Intel Wireless AC, features that are not available on Intel's Z370 chipset. 

  
Intel Launches their 8th Generation of Xeon E processors


Intel's new Xeon E-2100 series of processors are not supported on the company's older Xeon E6-compatible LGA 1151 motherboards, requiring an upgrade to C246. This new platform supports CPUs with up to six cores and a TDP of 95W and can sport up to six USB 3.1 ports, 10 USB 3.0 ports and eight SATA 3.0 ports. The chipset also supports four PCIe Gen 3 lanes over its DMI interface. 

  
Intel Launches their 8th Generation of Xeon E processors


Below are the specifications of Intel's new Xeon E-2100 series of processors, delivering TDPs that range from 95W to 71W and pricing that spans from $193 to $450. 

As you can see below core/thread counts of 4/4, 4/8, 6/6 and 6/12 are available, with 4/8 core/thread counts being absent Intel's current desktop processor lineup. Most of these processors offer support on Intel's professionally certified USH 630P graphics, with some select SKUs like the E-2136 lacking an internal graphics component. 

Interestingly, Intel's new Xeon-E 2086G processor offers slightly higher specifications than Intel's i7 8700K desktop processor, providing an increased base clock of 3.8GHz, a 100MHz boost over its desktop counterpart. 

  
Intel Launches their 8th Generation of Xeon E processors 

Intel's new entry-level Xeon users will see a substantial generational performance boost when upgrading to the company's latest processors, mostly thanks to the increased core/thread counts that are offered by the Coffee Lake CPU architecture. 

You can join the discussion on Intel's new entry-level Xeon E-2100 series of professional-grade processors on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

12-07-2018, 15:04:05

Gothmoth
6 cores? intel thinks it is 2016? Quote

12-07-2018, 15:22:39

Dawelio
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gothmoth View Post
6 cores? intel thinks it is 2016?
Well to be fair here, even though I do understand what you mean, you don't really need more than 6 cores.Quote

13-07-2018, 04:30:13

Vamp
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawelio View Post
Well to be fair here, even though I do understand what you mean, you don't really need more than 6 cores.
For enterprises?
Most of the times you do...Quote

13-07-2018, 08:25:59

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gothmoth View Post
6 cores? intel thinks it is 2016?
lol more like 2008 !

I had a couple of Westmere Xeons with 6 cores ffs. I had an 8 core Ivy and now have a 10 and 14c BE.

And they are celebrating 6 cores? lmfao. "So tonight I'm gonna party like it's 1999" comes to mind

And yeah, most enterprise software is massively threaded because servers run massively cored CPUs with low clock speeds. So you will really be missing a trick.Quote

13-07-2018, 15:01:01

Dawelio
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vamp View Post
For enterprises?
Most of the times you do...
Oh, thought it was for mainstream users and not enterprises lol.Quote
Reply
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