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Intel i7 9700K appears on the Geekbench Database

How powerful is the i7 9700K

Intel i7 9700K appears on the Geekbench Database

Intel i7 9700K appears on the Geekbench Database

Intel's upcoming 9th Generation of processors is perhaps the worst kept secret in the PC market right now, with reports on the series dating back to 2018, accurately predicting the processor's use of eight cores on the company's long-lived LGA 1151 socket.  

Now, Intel's i7-9700K has appeared on the Beekbench database, showcasing extremely high levels of CPU performance for a stock processor, delivering performance numbers that are close to what we achieved when overclocking an i7-8700K in both single-threaded and multi-threaded performance. 

The primary differences between the i7-9700K and i7-8700K are their core/thread counts and clock speeds, with the i7-9700K offering eight cores and no hyperthreading. In contrast, the i7-8700K offers six cores and hyperthreading support, leaving many to ask the question, which is better, the extra two cores or hyperthreading support. The i7-9700K also delivers higher boost clock speeds, allowing it to achieve similar performance levels to an overclocked i7-8700K. 

In our i7 8700K testing (link), our test system achieved a single-core score of 6477 and a multi-core score of 30141 when overclocked to 5GHz, delivering similar results to what we see below with the i7-9700K. This is an extremely impressive result for what appears to be a stock i7-9700K, offering end-users a notable boost in performance over its last-generation counterpart. The question now is, how far will the i7-9700K overclock?

Intel i7 9700K appears on the Geekbench Database  

The result above was achieved on a Gigabyte Z370 Aorus Ultra Gaming motherboard, confirming that existing Z370motherboards will support 8-core 9th Generation processors with a BIOS update. 

With this generation, Intel will release a processor that will stand above their i7 models, an i9-series processor that will offer users a total of eight cores and sixteen threads. This CPU model will be called the i9-9900K. 

You can join the discussion on Intel's i7 9700K appearing on the Geekbench database on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

03-09-2018, 05:54:39

Dicehunter
The single core score looks basically identical to an 8700K, Multi is only just about 2000 points higher from the 2 extra cores, Guessing it'll be the same story with the 9900K but maybe 1-2K higher on the multi part due to hyperthreading.

EDIT

I should really read before commenting in future Quote

03-09-2018, 06:14:24

AlienALX
Yeah, pretty predictable really.Quote

03-09-2018, 07:46:31

Chopper3
I've got a major gaming PC overhaul due as soon as the 9900K is available and I'm a bit confused about something, perhaps you guys can help. I bought an existing Asus Z370 mobo that already had a firmware update available to support the 9th-gen parts but my current setup is based on an 1150 part, not 1151. Almost certainly the new mobo will have an older, non-9th-gen-supporting, firmware on it. I'm a bit worried about how I go about applying the newer firmware to the mobo with only the future 9900k available to me. I have vague memories about mobo makers helping out with this by shipping out a heavily-crippled cpu to allow for the update to happen - is this a thing still or does anyone know how I can deal with this 'catch-22' situation? My only 'plan-b' is to buy a Celeron 4900 (about £30 plus shipping) as that would definitely work but I wondered if you guys may have any thoughts or experiences. Cheers.Quote

03-09-2018, 07:53:10

Dicehunter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chopper3 View Post
I've got a major gaming PC overhaul due as soon as the 9900K is available and I'm a bit confused about something, perhaps you guys can help. I bought an existing Asus Z370 mobo that already had a firmware update available to support the 9th-gen parts but my current setup is based on an 1150 part, not 1151. Almost certainly the new mobo will have an older, non-9th-gen-supporting, firmware on it. I'm a bit worried about how I go about applying the newer firmware to the mobo with only the future 9900k available to me. I have vague memories about mobo makers helping out with this by shipping out a heavily-crippled cpu to allow for the update to happen - is this a thing still or does anyone know how I can deal with this 'catch-22' situation? My only 'plan-b' is to buy a Celeron 4900 (about £30 plus shipping) as that would definitely work but I wondered if you guys may have any thoughts or experiences. Cheers.
The Asus Z370 mobo may have a bios flashback button on the I/O, Simply put the bios file on a USB drive, Put the drive into the correct rear USB slot and press and hold the bios flashback button, If it doesn't have that then the only option would be to buy a cheap 1151 CPU like a Pentium G4900 which can be had for around 30 quid used from amazon.Quote

03-09-2018, 09:06:14

MiNo
I'm somewhat surprised that the 9700K single core perf is no better than of the 8700K. I would have expected more performance pr clock after one generation. But perhaps I/we should just be happy that the 9700K score is without OC. That is something, but more pr clock should really be there also.



Or? What am I missing here?Quote
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