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Intel accidentally reveals the specifications of most of their 9th Generation processors

Intel's 9000 series CPUs are a lot like their 8000 series

Intel reveals their 9th Generation Coffee Lake S processors

Intel accidentally reveals the specifications of most of their 9th Generation processors

Intel has unwittingly exposed the specs of most of their 9th Generation (9000-series) of Coffee Lake products, most of which are rebranded versions of the company's 8th generation offerings. 

Yesterday, an Intel Spectre/Meltdown Microcode mitigation PDF revealed the existence of a multitude of i3 and i5-class 9000 series processors, though a lesser known document has also been released which has published the specifications of these SKUs, including their core count, base clock speed and boost clock speeds. This specification leak lacks any information about Intel's rumoured 9th Generation 80core i7 series processors.  

Intel has since deleted this document, but not before WikiChip was able to record and archive this data in the table below. For the most part, these new SKUs are re-released versions of 8000-series SKUs with minor clock speed bumps, with the 9600K offering a 100MHz increase in base clock speed and a 200MHz increase in boost clock speed. Sadly this specifications leak has not confirmed whether or not Intel is activating hyperthreading on any of these products. 

With their 9000 series, Intel is left in an exciting position. They could release both i7 and i9 class processors with their 9th generation, delivering i3's with four cores/threads, i5 processors with six cores/threads, i7 CPUs with eight cores/threads and i9 series processors with eight cores and hyperthreading. 

What we believe is more likely is that Intel will release their processors with Hyperthreading on all of their i3, i5 and i7 series processors, segmenting their i-series processors by core count alone, offering i3 processors with 4 cores with hyperthreading, i5-class CPUs as six-core processors with hyperthreading and i7-series processors with eight cores and hyperthreading. This change will make Intel's core/thread counts even with AMD's Ryzen series processors, and turn their 9th generation i3's into what were previously 7th generation i7's. 

Intel accidentally reveals the specifications of most of their 9th Generation processors

(Image from WikiChip)

  
You can join the discussion on Intel's 9th Generation of Coffee Lake processors on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

04-07-2018, 15:36:57

AlienALX
No see this is what I was talking about the other day. This is not accidental at all. It is deliberately aimed to get people excited so they say "Ooo, look accidental spec release !".

It's not that way at all. *Everything* is an accidental leak these days for god's sake. What better way to appeal to a human than to give him something he is not supposed to have. That is human nature and how we are. We don't want things we can have, we want the things we can't.

Same reason the rectal douches all walk in the cycle paths down here, rather than the sodding path right next to them !

This is all marketing BS and people fall for it time and time again. Come on guys, have the intelligence to see through it or we are doomed as a race.Quote

04-07-2018, 15:53:36

Dicehunter
I'm with Alien on this, No such thing as leaks, It's information sent out to various venues and labelled as a "leak" to get people excited, I'm amazed more people don't have the intelligence to see this.Quote

04-07-2018, 16:00:54

Bartacus
I thought this was common knowledge? Or so I had hoped. Lord knows I don't need any MORE reasons to wish the zombie apocalypse happens!Quote

04-07-2018, 17:16:02

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicehunter View Post
I'm with Alien on this, No such thing as leaks, It's information sent out to various venues and labelled as a "leak" to get people excited, I'm amazed more people don't have the intelligence to see this.
Companies like Intel and Nvidia are large fry. IE - if you leak their crap you will pay millions of dollars. Any one who has ever signed an NDA will understand what I am talking about. They are incredibly strict, and Intel and Nvidia *always* put measures in place so that if a leak does occur they will know exactly who it came from and where.

So, the next time there is a "leak" I want to see the proof of lawsuits and fines paid. Otherwise it would make a complete mockery not only of the NDA as a rule but also the company who was dumb enough not to protect their secrets.

As an example (and believe me I am about as small fry as it gets) years ago if I was testing software I had made and wanted people to test it I would mark the software, then draw a map showing whose software had a mark where. It worked superbly well, I managed to catch some ahole who thought he could have one over on me by leaking my crap.

Later on in life I signed an NDA (it ended up going nowhere, but I was supposed to be drawing for a company) and believe me they are strict down to the bloody letter.Quote

05-07-2018, 04:34:52

Peace
An NDA is part of my work right now. I also signed an NDA once and while reading through it, all you think is "woa, better not talk to anybody about this :X"

I'm also with you Alien, nothing shouts "Intentional!" more than an "accidental leak".Quote
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