How to install an X399 CPU

TR4 is a lot more difficult to install than AM4

How to install an X399 CPU

How to install an X399 CPU

 
At the time of writing AMD's latest X399/Threadripper CPUs have not been released to the public, at least in the form of standalone CPU/motherboard products. 
 
When considering a new CPU platform there are many factors to consider, whether the specifications are suitable for your particular use case and whether or not your product is easy to instal and utilise in your existing workflow. Yes, most people will battle through a difficult instal or system build to access more performance later, but ease of use is certainly a worthy consideration. 
 
MSI has released a new video that details how X399 CPUs should be installed, with this new series from AMD offering with it a mounting system that will look foreign to anyone outside of the enterprise market. The following video will show you how to install and AMD X399 CPU, using an instal process that will require the user to have a Torx-bit screwdriver. 
 
Previously, many sites alleged that AMD's TR4 socket would have a more user-friendly version of AMD's EPYC SP3 socket, though this doesn't seem to be the case. Let's hope that AMD ship all required tools with their X399 CPUs, as it would be exceptionally annoying to need to buy a new screwdriver kit after attempting to install a $799+ CPU. 

  

 

X399 is a complex socket, but it is designed for users whose system requirements are much higher than average. If you don't need the extra CPU cores or PCIe lanes provided by Threadripper, AM4/Ryzen may turn out to be a better option.   

 

You can join the discussion on AMD's TR4 CPU socket on the OC3D Forums

 

Special Thanks to AlienALX for bringing this video to our attention. 

«Prev 1 Next»

Most Recent Comments

29-07-2017, 05:03:57

AlienALX
I love the tray it comes in very clever.Quote

29-07-2017, 07:47:36

Dicehunter
I still think having such a large chip with 2 x dies disabled is somewhat stupid, They could have halved the size of the PCB and socket by just using 2 x fully working 8 core dies instead of using failed Epyc parts.Quote

29-07-2017, 07:51:07

Excalabur50
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlienALX View Post
I love the tray it comes in very clever.
I do too must say it surprised meQuote

29-07-2017, 07:51:59

AlienALX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicehunter View Post
I still think having such a large chip with 2 x dies disabled is somewhat stupid, They could have halved the size of the PCB and socket by just using 2 x fully working 8 core dies instead of using failed Epyc parts.
I can absolutely promise you we WILL see 32c 64t chips. I absolutely guarantee it. Then the socket would not be big enough dude.

It's like looking at X99 and then seeing a dual core Xeon ES for it. Seems dumb, but when you consider you can have up to 18 cores on that size die it makes sense.Quote

29-07-2017, 12:49:42

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicehunter View Post
I still think having such a large chip with 2 x dies disabled is somewhat stupid, They could have halved the size of the PCB and socket by just using 2 x fully working 8 core dies instead of using failed Epyc parts.
It's not stupid at all

First off if they did what you asked for it would have cost way way more to make.
Secondly they are not using "failed parts". They are literally placeholders so they can keep the design the same to reduce costs. It's fake chipsQuote
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.