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AMD's Athlon 3000G is a game-changer for the budget CPU market

AMD plans to offer more than Intel in the $50 CPU market.

AMD's Athlon 3000G is a game-changer for the budget CPU market

AMD's Athlon 3000G is a game-changer for the budget CPU market

Last year, AMD released its first Ryzen-based Athlon, the 200GE, delivering performance levels that are competitive with Intel's Pentium series for $55. This was a great product from AMD, offering an affordable entry point into AMD's AM4 ecosystem and competition at the $50ish CPU market. 

Now, AMD wants to give its customers more for less. With their new Athlon 3000G, AMD will deliver higher clock speeds, lower pricing and overclockability. AMD wants to put Intel's Pentium lineup to shame. 

For starters, AMD's new Athlon 3000G will offer users a 300MHz clock speed boost over last-years Athlon 200GE, as well as the performance benefits of AMD's Zen+ core design. Add that to AMD's $49 SEP pricing, and the budget CPU market has a lot to be excited about. 

The Athlon 3000GE will release on November 19th and support both CPU and memory overclocking. Add this to AMD's inclusion of a 55W cooling solution, and users of this processor should be able to achieve enhanced performance levels with ease. 

This processor is designed to be a Pentium killer, offering consumers low pricing, support for both CPU and memory overclocking; features that Intel's Pentium series lacks. Combine this with better out of the box performance (at least in AMD's testing) and AMD's on to a winner. 
 

AMD's Athlon 3000G is a game-changer for the budget CPU market  
With the 3000G, AMD is offering buyers a processor that's the "only unlocked option in its segment". In AMD's labs, the company managed to overclock their sample to 3.9GHz, granting users a respectable performance bump over the CPU's stock 3.5GHz performance.  

AMD's Athlon 3000G is a game-changer for the budget CPU market  

While this processor doesn't have the same appeals as AMD's new Ryzen 9 3950X or Ryzen Threadripper 3rd Generation processors, the Athlon 3000G highlights AMD's desire to outcompete Intel in all segments of the desktop PC market. The 3000G looks like a cracking CPU for under $50, and it is a great addition to AMD's AM4 product ecosystem. 

You can join the discussion on AMD's Athlon 3000G processor on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

07-11-2019, 09:32:50

ET3D
Finally a quality publication giving attention to the most exciting processor to be announced. No, seriously, AMD did a good job getting me excited with the sub-$50 pricing and unlocked CPU.


Hopefully someone will delid this and finally settle the question of whether AMD is using special 2C/4T dies, which was generally understood to be the case when the 2nd gen APUs were released, but I haven't seen anyone showing it to be true.Quote

07-11-2019, 09:37:46

AlienALX
Great for office PCs. Doubt it would do much else, though.

Well, that or a decent media PC Quote

07-11-2019, 10:26:52

tgrech
Quote:
Originally Posted by ET3D View Post
Hopefully someone will delid this and finally settle the question of whether AMD is using special 2C/4T dies, which was generally understood to be the case when the 2nd gen APUs were released, but I haven't seen anyone showing it to be true.
There is supposedly a 2c Zen die, such as those used for Banded Kestrel, for which a Zen+ variant could be used as the basis for these upcoming 2c/4t models, but I think so far it's only embedded processors that have used these 2c/4t dies, with the original Zen Athlons (200G and up) being based on cut down 4c/8t APU dies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2GC_wbJj_8Quote

07-11-2019, 15:34:40

ET3D
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
There is supposedly a 2c Zen die, such as those used for Banded Kestrel

Far as I know, nobody proved that Banded Kestrel exists. It was on the roadmap years ago, and I think that AMD did confirm to Anandtech that the 2C Ryzen 3000 Mobile chips are a different die, but I don't remember seeing any official word from AMD or any technical specs for it (such as die size). There was a rumour of a PCIe x4 limitation, but again, I don't think it was ever confirmed.


Naturally not many people would delid a mobile chip, and few enthusiasts have access to embedded ones. An entry level desktop chip is a good opportunity to check this.Quote

07-11-2019, 17:46:34

tgrech
It exists, you can see one of the fair few Banded Kestrel devices here: https://www.sapphiretech.com/en/commercial/amd-fs-fp5r

As you can see, the die shape is closer to a square, while the larger APU dies are about a 2:1 rectangle, so it does use a die different from those on the 2c/4t Athlon 200G or V1202B which looks like this:
https://tpucdn.com/cpudb/images/chip...ront.small.jpg
as opposed to this:
https://i.gyazo.com/d34a51f4b6ff4c3d...b76d89be1a.pngQuote
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