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AMD releases Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H specifications - APUs for gaming notebooks

High-end APUs for gaming notebooks

AMD releases Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H specifications - APUs for gaming notebooks

AMD releases Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H notebook APU specifications

AMD's APUs have always held a lot of promise within the gaming market, promising to offer low price tags while delivering compelling performance levels on both the CPU and GPU side. 

AMD is the only company that currently offers high-end CPUs and graphics cards, placing the company in a unique position to develop single-chip solutions for the notebook market, products that would be ideal for gamers on a budget and professional users whose workflow would benefit from GPU acceleration.

So far, AMD's Ryzen Mobile APU offerings have been limited to low-TDP silicon, with their Ryzen U-series offering configurable TDPs of 12-25W. While these products are ideal for some users, others would prefer to access higher performance levels, something that is only possible with higher-TDP offerings. This is where AMD's new Ryzen H-series comes in.     

AMD has officially revealed their Ryzen H-series of high-end notebook processors, offering higher clock speeds than their U-series counterparts and significantly higher base clock speeds, promising increased performance levels for both gamers and professional users alike. 

Specifications for both AMD's Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H have been released on AMD's website, promising TDPs of between 35W and 54W and clock speeds that start from 3.2GHz and 3.3GHz respectively. Both of these APUs also offer support for 3200MHz memory out of the box, an important factor to consider if gamers want to get the most out of AMD's iGPU. 


 Ryzen 5 2500URyzen 5 2600HRyzen 3 2200GRyzen 7 2700URyzen 7 2800HRyzen 5 2400G
CPU SocketFP5FP5AM4FP5FP5AM4
Manufacturing Process14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm14nm
Cores/Threads4/84/84/44/84/84/8
CCX4+04+04+04+04+04+0
CPU Base Clock2.0GHz3.2GHz3.5GHz2.2GHz3.3GHz3.6GHz
CPU Boost Clock3.6GHz3.6GHz3.7GHz3.8GHz3.8GHz3.9GHz
L2 Cache2MB2MB2MB2MB2MB2MB
L3 Cache4MB4MB4MB4MB4MB4MB
Memory Support (Dual Channel)2400MHz3200MHz2933MHz2400MHz3200MHz2933MHz
TDP12-25W35-54W65W12-25W35-54W65W
iGPUVegaVegaVegaVegaVegaVega
iGPU Stream Processors512512512640704704
iGPU Clock SpeedUp to 1100MHzUp to 1100MHzup to 1100MHz

Up to 1300MHz

Up to 1300MHzup to 1250MHz

 

AMD releases Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H specifications - APUs for gaming notebooks


AMD has listed both the Ryzen 5 2600H and the Ryzen 2800H with a launch date of 9/10/2018, which means that we should learn more about these APUs within the next month. 

You can join the discussion on AMD's Ryzen 5 2600H and Ryzen 7 2800H APUs on the OC3D Forums

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Most Recent Comments

17-09-2018, 08:18:54

Giggyolly
I'm Surprised AMD hasn't released some higher core count cpus for notebooks yetQuote

17-09-2018, 08:33:11

WYP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giggyolly View Post
I'm Surprised AMD hasn't released some higher core count cpus for notebooks yet
Their higher core count CPUs don't have iGPUs, making them a non-starter in the laptop market for the most part. There are a few notebooks with their Six-core and eight core models though Ryzen 5 2600 and Ryen 7 2700, but they are not really "small and light".Quote

17-09-2018, 09:24:32

ET3D
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giggyolly View Post
I'm Surprised AMD hasn't released some higher core count cpus for notebooks yet

Me too. While WYP has a point, gaming and workstation laptops come with discrete GPUs and a Zen+ CPU would likely reach pretty good performance at 35-45W, making for a potent combination.Quote

18-09-2018, 16:04:27

tgrech
Quote:
Originally Posted by ET3D View Post
Me too. While WYP has a point, gaming and workstation laptops come with discrete GPUs and a Zen+ CPU would likely reach pretty good performance at 35-45W, making for a potent combination.
Very doubtable. Would almost certainly just result in significant portions of dark silicon or such cripplingly low clocks you'd probably be better off with dark silicon. You have more waste heat due to having to have two memory controllers, two banks of memory, external chipset(The APUs are a full SoC), ect that in total would almost certainly lead to at least 20Ws of wasted energy in comparison to an APU based system. And this is besides the fact you'd likely have needed 70W+ minimum from the get go to make proper use of more than one CCX and 11 Vega cores without them throttling.Quote

18-09-2018, 18:58:16

NeverBackDown
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgrech View Post
Very doubtable. Would almost certainly just result in significant portions of dark silicon or such cripplingly low clocks you'd probably be better off with dark silicon. You have more waste heat due to having to have two memory controllers, two banks of memory, external chipset(The APUs are a full SoC), ect that in total would almost certainly lead to at least 20Ws of wasted energy in comparison to an APU based system. And this is besides the fact you'd likely have needed 70W+ minimum from the get go to make proper use of more than one CCX and 11 Vega cores without them throttling.
Pretty sure he was referring to a Ryzen non APU chip with a dedicated Nvidia graphics as an example.Quote
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