OCZ SSD 32GB Solid State Hard Disk

WinAVI, PeaZip & Dummy File Results

WinAVI Video Conversion
 
The transcoding of video files between different formats for use on devices such as portable media players or burning to DVD is becoming increasingly common in todays digital world. While the method of conversion is largely CPU intensive, it requires a fast hard disk to keep up with the stream of data. For this stage of the testing we used a 600mb Xvid encoded AVI file placed on each of the hard disks and then used WinAVI to transcode the file into DVD format. The time taken was recorded with a stop watch.
 
WinAVI Results
 
Both the OCZ SSD and the Velociraptor made light work of the XVID to DVD conversion with a negligble 2 second difference between them. The RaptorX showed that it couldn't quite keep up the pace of it's 2.5" counterparts, finishing up in last place with an 8 second gap.
 
 
Peazip File Compression
 
File compression is yet another area where the system is just as reliant on the performance of the CPU as it is on the hard drive. To simulate the compression of various types of files, a folder containing a collection of 200 text documents filled with random contents and file sizes varying from 1KB to 100MB was copied to each of the hard disks. This folder was then  compressed and decompressed using a utility called Peazip which provided us with an accurate "time taken" reading.
 
Peazip Compression
 
PeaZip Decompression
 
With identical results being scored from all thread of the drives on test, this could well be an indication that the compression process was bottlenecked more by the performance of the CPU than it was by the hard disks. However, when it comes round to decompression we can see that the Velociraptor decompressed the file in 6 seconds flat, while the OCZ SSD took a further 4.5 seconds. This somewhat mirrors the less than impressive write results seen over on the previous page.
 
 
Dummy File Creation
 
When performing manual "file copy" benchmarks, the performance of the drive that the files are being copied from can directly and negatively affect the results of the drive they are being copied to. This is something that needs to be taken into consideration when benchmarking high performance hard disks such as the OCZ SSD as it's performance easily excees that of a standard hard disk. Therefore, to test the write performance of each storage device a freeware utility called Dummy File Creator was used to generate files directly to each of the hard disks removing the possibility of any bottlenecks.
 
The results below show how long each of the drives took to write 20GB of files with sizes ranging from 1MB to 1GB.
 
Dummy File Creator Results
 
Once again we can see just how good the write performance of the WD Velociraptor is, with the full 20GB being written to the disk in almost 1/2 the time of the OCZ SSD. Even the RaptorX makes a complete joke of the SSD, completing the transfer 2 1/2 minutes faster.
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Most Recent Comments

17-07-2008, 08:40:09

JN
"Today we place OCZ's 32GB Solid State Disk against the speedy Western Digital Velociraptor. How will they compare? Read on to find out..."

http://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/artic...200300944s.jpg

OCZ SSD 32GB Solid State Hard Disk

17-07-2008, 08:50:18

Bungral
Muahaha been spying on this...

Off to read the conclusion page now

Edit: Very cool.

Nice review Jimbo. Figured it could end up something like that.

Quick question aimed at anyone who can answer.

On a game like Footy Manager, what does it require the most. I know the game reads from a massive database but then it is also continually writing updated info. Obviously the CPU needs to be good for crunching but would a hdd be slowing down performance in a game like that?

17-07-2008, 09:42:38

Ham
Still too expensive as you say. But at least they're getting there.

17-07-2008, 10:13:37

Rastalovich
Great review m8, I wouldn`t stick it in a laptop myself as again it`s too small - perhaps a counterpart but then the price goes up again.

A desktop OS only drive tho, they`d be tremendous.

Price is a big thing for me, and I personally think they`re going to be too high for too long b4 something else comes out to take them out of the market.

Even with platter drives coming down in cost, as if a 2T drive is on the horizon, they`ve got alot of ground to make up for me.

Price ? I don`t think they`ll get much cheaper. Memory chips for the size required for a drive are never that cheap on the market. (just imagine trying to build a similar ssd with a blank pcb and filling it urself... hmmm there`s an idea.. a pcb with 10 ddr & 10 ddr2 slots u can stick in all ur left over memory in..)

17-07-2008, 10:44:52

Bungral
Rast.. Ya say that by the time they get to a decent level something else will more than likely have come along. But how long have we been using platter hdds now? They are still in their infancy and memory chip prices are dropping very fast. I remember when a 4GB USB stick would set ya back 80.. Get them for less than a tenner now.

17-07-2008, 11:16:37

Rastalovich
I dunno. I mean it`s one thing to produce on a small scale, but to bring something the likes that will replace harddrive tech on a gig for gig scale, I don`t feel the memory chips are going to get to a cheap enough level.

Manufacturers are also reluctant to produce older memory chip when the tech moves forward. The pricing of the likes of PC100/133 memory aint as cheap as it once was, similarly when DDR3 becomes the main memory brand, DDR2 isn`t going to be as cheap or available as it is now. Then ofc DDR will be in the same situ as PC100/133.

It`s plain that many memory chips get bought on a bulk scale in order to make the likes of usb pen drives. If as many ssd manufacturers turn up as there are usb drive makers, then perhaps the same chip prices could be compared. But from what I see in this review, they`re using new 4G memory chips, which are different to those used in pens afaik.

Ofc time will tell, but I don`t personally see it.

17-07-2008, 11:21:43

Bungral
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Rastalovich'
I dunno. I mean it`s one thing to produce on a small scale, but to bring something the likes that will replace harddrive tech on a gig for gig scale, I don`t feel the memory chips are going to get to a cheap enough level.

Manufacturers are also reluctant to produce older memory chip when the tech moves forward. The pricing of the likes of PC100/133 memory aint as cheap as it once was, similarly when DDR3 becomes the main memory brand, DDR2 isn`t going to be as cheap or available as it is now. Then ofc DDR will be in the same situ as PC100/133.

It`s plain that many memory chips get bought on a bulk scale in order to make the likes of usb pen drives. If as many ssd manufacturers turn up as there are usb drive makers, then perhaps the same chip prices could be compared. But from what I see in this review, they`re using new 4G memory chips, which are different to those used in pens afaik.

Ofc time will tell, but I don`t personally see it.
HDD used to be very expensive too though. I remember buying a 20GB HDD for 60 second hand from CEX about 7 years ago or so.

As older memory becomes more expensive and the newer stuff cheaper they will just start using the more up to date memory in the SSDs.

But yeah.. Only time will tell.

17-07-2008, 11:36:07

Rastalovich
80G hard drives still carry a fair price, and they`re in good circulation although they`re due to increase to around 120G as a standard `work` based pc.

If u went to an online webstore to buy a harddrive, u wouldn`t purchase an 80G (if u can find one) cos of it`s comparative price to the higher capacity. More or less because u make a 80G drive with the same foundation as a 120G.

It`s major parts aren`t a commodity too. They`re just platters.

17-07-2008, 11:39:48

Bungral
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Rastalovich'
80G hard drives still carry a fair price, and they`re in good circulation although they`re due to increase to around 120G as a standard `work` based pc.

If u went to an online webstore to buy a harddrive, u wouldn`t purchase an 80G (if u can find one) cos of it`s comparative price to the higher capacity. More or less because u make a 80G drive with the same foundation as a 120G.

It`s major parts aren`t a commodity too. They`re just platters.
But the platters with lower density and lower capacities are becoming rarer so prices wouldn't be as low as you'd think. Same with what you said about old DDR RAM. As the tech moves on, companies pick up the better newer tech and utilize that. Same should happen with memory chips for SSDs as more and more companies produce them on a larger scale.

17-07-2008, 11:43:15

Rastalovich
Afaik, u can take a standard platter material, of size and fashion it into the density u require.

They`re not like set in stone on creation, more of a blank fabric to etch what u want - on.

Wiki`ll know I spect.

Kind of if I reduce the head size required to read/write, I can double my capacity, but the platter can stay the same *theory*. Material wize.

17-07-2008, 14:49:42

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Rastalovich'
Great review m8, I wouldn`t stick it in a laptop myself as again it`s too small - perhaps a counterpart but then the price goes up again.
Yeah I suppose it all depends on what you use your laptop for really. For me, My laptop has XP on it and that's about it. I use it for checking my mail on the train etc but nothing more. If I could eek a bit of extra battery life out of my lappy by switching to SSD and also have almost instant resume from hibernate that might just be worth it.

17-07-2008, 16:33:34

ionicle
i think i'll stick with the tried and tested mechanical hard drive

good review though

18-07-2008, 04:33:35

monkey7
How about sound/heat production of the two drives? How much more power efficient is the SSD really?

18-07-2008, 13:56:39

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='monkey7'
How about sound/heat production of the two drives? How much more power efficient is the SSD really?
SSD

----

Sound = 0

Heat=0

Velociraptor

------------

Sound= Much much quieter than the RaptorX

Heat = 5-10c above ambient - tops

As for power efficiency, its a hard one to measure with two devices that really don't pull much power in the first place. I think its fair to say the SSD uses significantly less power tho.
Reply
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