Corsair V128 Nova Review

Main Testing

Corsair V128 Nova  Review

Main Tests

ATTO Disk Benchmark

ATTO is one of the best SSD tests around. Many HDD based testers can't handle SSDs easily, but ATTO handles them with aplomb.

In our read tests the performance of both drives is very similar, with the Corsair just missing its 270MB/s acclaimed performance, but still handily smashing past the 250MB/s barrier. Blazing speed doesn't begin to cover it.

In write tests it was even more impressive. Corsair claim 195MB/s but we saw 197MB/s come up regularly.

The main point of note here is the huge difference between the Corsair and the Crucial when dealing with very large or very small segments. Although the Crucial M225 has a lead between 128K and 1024K, at the other extremes it's well behind the Corsair Nova.

Crystal Disk Mark

New to our testing is Crystal Disk Mark 3.0. This has added two new features, 64bit support and the QD32 test. With such a huge file chunk, and a different method of testing, neither drive match the pure speed of the ATTO test, but the results are similar with the Corsair Nova proving to be one of the best performing drives we've seen.

Everest Ultimate

As plain old speed tests can become tiresome, especially with SSDs which have a certain performance and pretty much any test will hit it, here we're using Everest Ultimate to plot a read graph so you can see that the sustained transfer performance is just as impressive as the out and out speed.

Corsair V128 Nova  Review

PC Mark Vantage

As a reviewer you have a love/hate relationships with benchmarking software. On the one hand they give you hard and fast results which is something we all adore. But on the other hand they do take up enormous amount of time. After all, the best way to get a result is to run a test that is repeatable, and this repeatability takes time. PC Mark Vantage is one of those packages that breaks this rule by covering so many different real-world tests that it saves time and is a boon to testing the performance of a system.

In every test the Corsair was noticeably faster and "snappier" than the Crucial. Considering that the Crucial is by no means a slow drive this is impressive indeed.

Finally we'll look at some game loading times.

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Most Recent Comments

19-04-2010, 05:12:26

tinytomlogan
SSD's are still high on many peoples wish lists, so VB takes a look at the new Corsair varient.

Continue Reading

19-04-2010, 05:41:49

Chewbacca
I want one! Does it really make that much of a difference going from a normal HDD to an SSD?

19-04-2010, 05:47:21

VonBlade
Imagine going from 512MB of RAM on Windows 7 to 4GB.

19-04-2010, 06:41:53

Rastalovich
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Chewbacca'
I want one! Does it really make that much of a difference going from a normal HDD to an SSD?
Not for the outlay. At still over 2 a gig, for the home user I'd still not recommend them.

At such a low capacity, u would probably end up using ur old drive as a means to store stuff, leaving mainly the OS, and ur malware etc on the SSD.

For definite, if the cash is available and u don't use much harddrive space, they're great. But apparently having the cash to buy a pc component is not meant to be the way to look at it, ur meant to look at them value for money. Bang for buck. Speed for sure - capacity (the bread and butter of drives) a definite no. Some people will buy these then complain about the prices of other things, e.g.

I use them in many pc/mac setups now and tbh, if ur OS is installed and maintained efficiently, there are just as viable alternatives, leaving u to spend ur cash on more important components.

19-04-2010, 07:22:18

tinytomlogan
I personally see an SSD as an important part of a high spec system now. mechanicals just dont cut it once you have used a decent SSD. Even short stroked drives you can still notice a difference tbh.

19-04-2010, 07:45:33

nunzio
What I would like to see as a test is if you keep your OS/System on a hdd, and put the games installed on the ssd, would that make much of a difference?

19-04-2010, 09:13:19

JN
Probably not a massive amount, but if you had the swap file on the SSD and not enough physical ram for the game to function inside it could improve performance a fair bit.

19-04-2010, 10:09:06

AMD_PBz
The results look very impressive for a Corsair SSD.

19-04-2010, 10:11:35

Rastalovich
Results aside, I had decent Corsair's supplied to me - well insisted actually - as I've not come across a more helpful support in a long time. And the controllers the SSDs use ofc.

20-04-2010, 07:08:11

Blackbeard
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='nunzio'
What I would like to see as a test is if you keep your OS/System on a hdd, and put the games installed on the ssd, would that make much of a difference?
I've actually done a few tests with the SSD as 'games data drive' and the OS on a HDD.

/digs up results

With the OS and game installed on a P128, a level in Crysis loaded in 18s, compared to 22s with the OS on a 7200.11 and the game installed on the P128. Game and OS on the 7200.11 was 40s.

So there's still a hefty benefit, but really you get the most from an SSD when you use it as an OS and game data drive (for gamers).
Reply
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