Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Review

Packaging & Appearance

Thermaltake  ToughPower XT 775w PSU Review

 

Packaging & Appearance

Normally at this point I'd spend a good few paragraphs going over the various corners of the packaging and making fun out of any spelling mistakes that found their way onto the retail product. However, as nobody thought to put our sample in any kind of outer packaging before placing it in the hands of the courier, the XT arrived looking it had been sent round the world 3 times, accumulating a wide selection of shipping labels before handed to a Rottweiler as a chew toy.

Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Inside  Thermaltake  ToughPower XT 775w PSU Contents

Anyway, if one thing can be said for the packaging it's that it did its job. The single walled cardboard box, two slabs of foam and a bubblewrap bag kept the PSU well away from the dents and gouges incurred by the couriers, and the fact that Thermaltake were clever enough to place the mains lead and modular cables in separate compartments also means that nothing inside the box was free to rub up against the PSU's paintwork during the journey.

The contents of the box are fairly standard with only a mains cord, some screws, a manual, the modular cables and of course the PSU included.

Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Top  Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Fan Grill

Removing the PSU from it's bag we get a first look at the unit. Colour-wise it's a a kind of greyish, silverish, brownish, gold painted in a rather coarse powdercoat finish. I have to admit not being too keen on the punched fan grille as it reminds me slightly of a ventilation fan often seen in toilets, and it does look somewhat restrictive in comparison to a wire mesh grille. However, Thermaltake do deserve some points here as it's a break from boring black and it does help to give the unit an identity.

Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Review  Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Review

The rear of the XT looks quite similar to that of the Corsair HX series with a 'b' shaped honeycomb grill surrounding the mains socket and power switch. A large portion of the area at the top of the PSU is also taken up with a specification sticker that contains all the usual warnings, certification logos and a rail layout chart.

Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Side  Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU LEDs

The side of the unit most likely to be visible from inside a windowed case hasn't escaped a large sticker either. In my opinion it does make the unit look a little tacky especially given that the sticker uses just matte colours with nothing special or shiny about it that would appeal to the Magpie inside me. However, in a completely unique move Thermaltake have actually placed three status LED's at the side of the unit that show when it is in Standby, Powered on or has had to switch off due to overheating.

Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Top  Thermaltake ToughPower XT 775w PSU Rear

Finally, the front of the unit features a punched Thermaltake logo along with a modular cable diagram sticker. A collection of eight modular connectors takes up most of the space, but let's move on to the next page and take a look at these in detail.

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Most Recent Comments

10-05-2010, 07:36:56

tinytomlogan
The XT may have 25w more power than its 750w competitors, but does it have what it takes to impress OC3D?

Continue Reading

11-05-2010, 04:20:43

Stefan Payne
Isn't the 775W version silver certified?

12-05-2010, 13:38:38

JN
Stefan, I've been hearing mixed things. Apparently the website says silver, but the box most definitely says bronze

Maybe they re-submitted after the first batch went out. :/

13-05-2010, 13:34:22

VonBlade
Great review as ever Jim. Only you could make endless power supplies always seem fresh and interesting.

Love the new graphs too. Far simpler for people with less knowledge like myself to see the important data.

Great stuff.

22-05-2010, 12:37:25

Stefan Payne
Ah, OK.

It seems that the PSU Manufacturers tend to not advertise the gained 80+ certification but rahter one (or even two!) down.

It's understandable if you'll know something about it.

Anyway, there is a mistake in that review:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Review

"Thermaltake TT-1425B". However, after a bit of digging around it would appear that it is actually a re-labelled Yate Loon D14BM-12
That's not the case.

If you'll take a closer look, you'll see 'HA1425M12B-Z' wich leads to Ong Hua, the same Ong Hua Fan you'll find in Corsairs HX750/850.

18-08-2010, 06:06:15

Newbie
Hi. Can I start by saying great site and great reviews. As you can see by the user name I'm new to this and would really appreciate some clarity on the figures (as I must be missing something).

I have taken the figures from the 25% load line

........3.3v 5v +12v 5vsb -12v Totals

Volts 3.34 5.07 12.1 5.08 -11.98 13.61V

Amps 4.5 4.5 12.75 0.75 0.12 22.62A

Power = volts * amps = 307.8582 Watts

The output power shown in the table is 197 DC Watts

Could someone please explain what I'm missing

Many thanks

18-08-2010, 09:14:00

JN
Hi Newbie, the reason you're arriving at a wattage higher than what is stated in the table is because you are multiplying the initial power draw against the resultant voltage output.

What the table actually shows is the amperage load placed on each of the rails, and the resulting voltage output by the rails due to the strain from the load.
Reply
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