OCZ Z-Series Z1000M 1000W ATX PSU

Simulated Load Testing

Simulated Load Testing
 
To provide accurate and consistent results in all of our PSU testing, Overclock3D uses professional grade DC electronic load equipment capable of placing a sustained load of 3690w across a total of six rails (including +5vsb and -12v) on the PSU! This is achieved by using a combination of SunMoon and Analogic electronic load equipment which allow us to adjust amperage loads in increments as small as 0.01A while also measuring voltage and wattage readings on-screen.
 
During today's tests, we will be placing the OCZ Z-Series Z1000M under 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% load levels at both room temperature and inside a hot box regulated to a temperature of around 50°C. Additional 'Cross Load' and a 'Max Load' tests will also be performed under these conditions to simulate how the PSU reacts to heavily uneven loads as well as running above its specified output.
 
OCZ Z-Series 1000w Results @ Room Temperature
   +3.3v  +5.0v  +12v  +5vSB  -12v  AC Watts /
 DC Watts
 Efficiency  Intake /
 Exhaust
Δ Temp
Test 1
(Low)
5.25A 5.25A 16.50A  1.50A  0.20A  280w /
256w
 91.42% 25.7°C /
31.1°C
5.2°C
3.36v 5.05v 12.27v 5.11v  -11.92v
Test 2
(Med)
10.50A 10.50A 33.00A 3.00A  0.40A  558w /
521w
 93.36%  25.6°C /
33.0°C
7.4°C
3.30v
4.96v
12.20v 5.03v  -11.92v
Test 3
(High)
15.75A 15.75A 49.50A  4.50A  0.60A  816w /
758w
 92.89%  25.5C /
34.7°C
9.2°C
3.23v 4.90v 12.14v 4.98v -11.95v
Test 4
(Full)
21.00A 21.00A 66.00A 6.00A  0.80A 1106w /
1002w
90.59%  25.8°C /
36.8°C
 11.0°C
3.16v 4.84v 12.06v 4.89v -12.02v
Test 5
(x-load)
21.00A 21.00A 1.00A 0.00A 0.00A 222w /
183w
82.43% 25.7°C /
32.5°C
6.8°C
3.29v 5.07v 12.16v 5.11v -12.46v
Test 6
(x-load)
 1.00A  1.00A  77.00A  0.00A  0.00A 1019w /
939w
92.14%  25.9°C /
35.7°C
 9.8°C
3.32v 4.98v 12.07v 5.11v -12.39v
Test 7
(MAX)
 25.00A  28.00A 85.00A  6.00A  0.80A  1429w /
1268w
88.73%  25.9°C /
38.9°C
 13.0°C
3.14v 4.81v 11.98v 4.87v -11.99v
 
OCZ Z-Series Z1000M Performance Overview
 +3.3v Diff.
T1-T4
 +5.0v Diff.
T1-T4
 +12v Diff.
T1-T4
+5vSB Diff.
T1-T2
-12v Diff.
T1-T2
Avg Effic.
T1-T4
Noise Rating
5.95% 4.15% 1.71%  4.30%  0.83% 92.06% Low
 
Firstly before we start, let me introduce you to our new performance overview chart. This chart is designed to give you an idea of a PSU's performance at a glance without having to navigate through the full set of test data. The first five rows labelled Diff. T1-T4 represent the voltage difference between Test 1 and Test 4 on each of the PSU's rails. The lower the percentage, the more stable you can assume the PSU is in a normal operational environment. Average efficiency on the other hand is calculated by taking the efficiency results from Test 1 to Test 4, adding them together and then dividing by 4. Of course, I still recommend that you take a look at the full set of test results for an idea of the actual voltage values and results in cross-load or max-load situations, but I hope you will agree that the performance chart is a worthy addition to the results data.
 
Now on to the actual results we can see quite a drop in the voltage of the 3.3v rail from Test 1 to Test 4 with a difference calculated at 5.95%. This is quite high in contrast to a lot of the other 700w+ PSU's we've reviewed recently which have managed to limit fluctuation to around 2%. The +5v rail keeps things just a little bit tighter with a difference of 4.15% between the T1 and T4 results, but once again this is still a few percent higher than its peers. Finally, the +12v rail is slightly more respectable with a fluctuation of 1.71%, equating to a difference of 0.21v between Test 1 and Test 4.
 
Moving on to the cross-load tests 5 and 6, all of the rails cope very well with no see-saw effects to be seen. This is extremely good as most PSU's tend to lose control of at least one of the rails in this situation (usually the -12v) sending the voltages sky-rocketing. The Max-Load results in Test 7 show us exactly what the Z1000M is capable of by managing to sustain a maximum load of 1268W with a massive 85A of that all on the +12v rail. The only issue here is that the +3.3v rail is once again quite low at 3.14v.
 
Efficiency during all tests was just as promised with the unit managing at least 90% efficiency across all of the standard tests. Only in Test 5 when a heavy load was applied to the +3.3v and +5v rails did the unit dip all the way down to 82.43% efficiency. However, as these tests are not part of the usual 80PLUS certification, this does not affect the Z1000M's gold ranking. Nor will it be an issue during general day-to-day use.
 
OCZ Z-Series 1000w Results @ 50°C
   +3.3v  +5.0v  +12v  +5vSB  -12v  AC Watts /
 DC Watts
 Efficiency  Intake /
 Exhaust
Δ Temp
Test 1
(Low)
5.25A 5.25A 16.50A  1.50A  0.20A  284w /
255w
 89.78% 50.0°C /
47.0°C
-3.0°C
3.36v 5.05v 12.25v 5.11v  -11.97v
Test 2
(Med)
10.50A 10.50A 33.00A 3.00A  0.40A  552w /
508w
 92.02%  50.8°C /
49.0°C
-1.8°C
3.30v
4.95v
12.18v 5.03v  -11.91v
Test 3
(High)
15.75A 15.75A 49.50A  4.50A  0.60A  822w /
758w
 92.21% 51.5C /
54.0°C
2.5°C
3.22v 4.89v 12.10v 4.98v -12.00v
Test 4
(Full)
21.00A 21.00A 66.00A 6.00A  0.80A 1093w /
1001w
91.58%  49.5°C /
55.6°C
 6.1°C
3.16v 4.84v 12.04v 4.88v -12.07v
Test 5
(x-load)
21.00A 21.00A 1.00A 0.00A 0.00A  222w /
183w
82.43% 51.2°C /
50.2°C
-1.0 °C
3.24v 4.90v 12.27v 5.14v -12.42v
Test 6
(x-load)
 1.00A  1.00A  77.00A  0.00A  0.00A 1019w /
939w
92.14%  50.7°C /
57.1°C
 6.4°C
3.31v 4.98v 12.06v 5.11v -12.38v
Test 7
(MAX)
 25.00A  28.00A 85.00A  6.00A  0.80A  1429w /
1268w
88.73%  50.8°C /
63.3°C
 12.5°C
3.14v 4.81v 11.98v 4.87v -11.97v
 
OCZ Z-Series Z1000M Performance Overview
 +3.3v Diff.
T1-T4
 +5.0v Diff.
T1-T4
 +12v Diff.
T1-T4
Avg Effic.
T1-T4
Noise Rating
-5.95%   -4.15% -1.71%  91.39% Low 
 
Placing the Z1000M in the OC3D hot-box dialled up to an ambient temperature of 50.0°C does very little to change the results. Almost all of the voltages are identical to the room temperature tests with the exception of a few that are only 0.01v lower. The efficiency levels also take a dip by around 1% during some of the tests, but this could equally be attributed to general fluctuation rather than any performance drop inside the unit. Now on to the ripple results... 
 
OCZ Z-Series Z1000M Scope Results @ 50c
   +3.3v  +5.0v  +12v
Test 1
(Low)
T1_3.3V T1_5V T1_12V
Test 2
(Med)
t2_3.3v t2_5v t2_12v
Test 3
(High)
t3_3.3v t3_5v t3_12v
Test 4
(Full)
t4_3v t4_5v t4_12v
Test 5
(x-load)
t5_3.3v t5_5v t5_12v
Test 6
(x-load)
t6_3.3v t6_5v t6_12v
Test 7
(MAX)
T7_3.3 T7_5 T7_12
 
For those of you not familiar with the term 'ripple' (other than in a flakey chocolate bar), this refers to the small fluctuations in voltage that occur in all PSU's on a milisecond scale. Large quantities of 'ripple' on a PSU can damage or kill components in your PC over time and therefore testing a PSU's performance in this area is just as important as any other part. Unfortunately ripple cannot be measured using a standard multimeter and requires a specialist device called an oscillioscope. The results you see above are taken from our Rigol 25Mhz 400MSa/s scope that can save 'screenshots' of its data to a USB memory stick.
 
ATX specification states that ripple should be no higher than 50mV on the +3.3v/+5v rails and 120mV on the +12v rails. As we can see from the results in Test 1 to Test 4, the OCZ Z1000M manages this with ease. The +3.3v rail begins at a very impressive 16mV in Test 1 and slowly creeps up to 40mV by Test 4, while the +5v rail starts at 11mV and only increases slightly to 18mV. The +12v rail is also very respectable, with a maximum Vpp of just under 60mV in Test 4.
 
Only when we move on to Test 7 does the ripple jump up significantly with 52mV ripple on the +3.3v rail and 90mV on the +12v rail. But by this time the Z1000M is running 268W above its rated output, so to stay pretty much within ATX spec still is a big accomplishment.
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Most Recent Comments

10-09-2009, 08:46:43

JN
"Today we take an exclusive first look at OCZ's 80PLUS Gold certified Z-Series Modular PSU. Can it hold its own in the OC3D labs? Read on to find out..."

http://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/artic...152531248s.jpg

OCZ Z-Series Z1000M 1000W ATX PSU

10-09-2009, 09:14:23

monkey7
You forgot the delta in the deltaTemp column header of the results table

why do I even see that O.o

Aside from that, great unit for high end rigs. Bring on the next gen graphics cards

10-09-2009, 09:15:29

Freak
I was taken back by the amount of amps that were on the 12 volt rail.

10-09-2009, 09:25:02

VonBlade
Impressive bit of kit. So many good products being released lately that we're almost starting to need a "OC3D top three recommendations" for catergories

Btw, did I miss the noise results? 100+cfm @ 30db sounds too good to be true.

Like the aluminium finish, just wish manu's would stop slapping big-ass stickers on them. We know what it can do, we've already brought it. Yeesh.

10-09-2009, 09:28:40

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='monkey7'
You forgot the delta in the deltaTemp column header of the results table

why do I even see that O.o

Aside from that, great unit for high end rigs. Bring on the next gen graphics cards
Good spot. The stupid wysiwyg editor keeps stripping those out randomly

Quote:
Originally Posted by freak

I was taken back by the amount of amps that were on the 12 volt rail.
Yeah even I was pretty impressed by how much that unit was pumping out, especially for its size.

10-09-2009, 09:35:17

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='VonBlade'
Impressive bit of kit. So many good products being released lately that we're almost starting to need a "OC3D top three recommendations" for catergories

Btw, did I miss the noise results? 100+cfm @ 30db sounds too good to be true.

Like the aluminium finish, just wish manu's would stop slapping big-ass stickers on them. We know what it can do, we've already brought it. Yeesh.
I dont really like to make any official noise comments on PSU's these days, but in the new 'Performance Overview' chart there is a 'Noise' section which I rate at either Low, Med or High based on how noisy it sounds at full load with my ear pressed against it.

The Z1000M certainly sounded low - in fact it hardly seemed to increase the fan speed (or at least the noise associated with a fan speed increase) through any of the loads.

I'm looking into a fan bypass switch for the load testers so I can briefly turn the fans off for long enough to hear the PSU. Thing is, even the bloody oscilloscope has a fan in it, so its never going to be a perfect analysis.

10-09-2009, 09:43:10

VonBlade
Thanks Jim. I know noise is stupidly subjective (I've got a 19db fan that sounds like a hurricane) but PSUs can be a source of noise it's impossible to rectify, unlike other cooling, so it's an important part in my decisions (which is still a HX series one).

Just a reasonable "loud, not so loud, is it on?" is absolutely fine, so thanks

I must have missed it in the performance chart. Overwhelming information lol.

10-09-2009, 10:32:05

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='VonBlade'

I must have missed it in the performance chart. Overwhelming information lol.
Yeah if you're just looking for the low-down then the new overview charts is probably the way to go. It shows the percentage of voltage fluctuation from idle to full load (highlighting those PSU manufacturers that set their idle voltages really high to compensate for the amount of droop at load), Average efficiency and noise.

I'm also putting together a top 10 chart at the moment which will be sorted in order of performance for all PSU' I've tested in the last year or so.

10-09-2009, 14:20:52

monkey7
What if you make a fan connection like used in psu's with a 5-12v pot and connect the fans to it? You're already ripping open the psu anyway.

Sure it would not be completely accurate and still be subjective, but together with your while-testing super subjective measurements it should be a little more precise.
Reply
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