Kingston HyperX DDR3 CL9 2000mhz 3GB Triple channel kit

Packaging & Appearance

Packaging & Appearance

Arriving in an understated plastic pack, the HyperX kit was moderately well packaged and should reach you in good condition provided it is adequately packed. A tamper proof seal is stuck over the outer shell ensuring you don't end up with someone else's RMA. Printed on the seal is the model number, CAS setting (9), and the PC3 speed (16000), not to be confused with 1600MHz.

DDR3 box open
 
Hidden underneath the centre stick is the warranty leaflet which doesn't really offer any valuable information other than the kit carries a lifetime warranty. This warranty is rapidly becoming the standard now albeit a welcome one and should provide piece of mind to the end user.

bits and bobs module front
 
The modules themselves are nothing special on the outside. While the blue satin, anodised finish to the aluminium heat spreaders are attractive they are a far cry from the over sized heat spreaders used on modules such as the Corsair Dominator and Patriot Viper kits we have previously reviewed. That said, they are attractive and Kingston obviously have faith in the heat spreaders as these modules are rated up to a maximum 1.65v and running at 2000MHz they are sure to get a little toasty. In view of this there is a separate kit available with extended memory heatsinks.

module rear reflective
 
As you can see below, the heat spreaders do not add very much to the size of the modules and certainly will not interfere with the fitment of over sized CPU coolers, no more than a standard module would in any case.

top bottom
 
 
Below right we see the same info printed on the module sticker as is printed on the package seal. Again, no specific information is provided such as the ram timings but the stock voltage of 1.65v is clearly printed. On the Kingston website, more information is available with rated speeds of 9-9-9. Notice I didn't mention a RAS Active delay timing? Kingston didn't either! So I will leave that setting to AUTO when testing and see what we come up with.

side part number
 
Removing the heat spreader was easily done with just thermal tape attaching the spreader to the integrated chips. Here we see that the HiperX 2000MHz modules make use of Samsung 843 HCF0 chips which are quality IC's and can no doubt run at the rated speed with ease. I would have liked to seen a different colour PCB than the standard Green as this colour looks dated by today's standards. I feel a matching blue PCB would have added to the aesthetics of the kit but as long as it performs who cares right?

Memory closeup
 
So there you have it. A good looking kit that while not exactly setting new standards in design, does the job and ticks all the right boxes, except one. Let's take a look at our run of benchmarks to see if it can make a clean sweep...

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Most Recent Comments

16-02-2009, 12:23:45

w3bbo
We have for review today, the first 2000MHz triple channel kit. The Kingston HyperX 2000MHz Triple channel kit is, at the time of writing this review, the fastest kit available for i7.

16-02-2009, 12:33:34

themcman1
I like the heat spreaders on those.

But the price....

16-02-2009, 12:38:32

Diablo
Linky to the forum is broken!

Also nice review, but preferred to see a 6GB at 1800, 3GB doesn't cut it, especially at those prices

16-02-2009, 19:51:00

OmegaStalker
i really love the Red heat spreaders on my G Skill i think they are tastefully done but they still look good but good point on changing color on the PCB... anyways that price is likely more then we mid-rangers can afford... but for performance good show...

18-02-2009, 10:28:54

VonBlade
Holy heck. That RAM flies. Didn't think that such a small (relative) difference between the two kits could have such a big effect in the graphs.

It's a steep price to pay, but i7 isn't a cheap thing to adopt anyway and if we pay 300 notes for our graphics, then why not speed up the whole system for less?

19-02-2009, 09:09:35

Hatman
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='VonBlade'
Holy heck. That RAM flies. Didn't think that such a small (relative) difference between the two kits could have such a big effect in the graphs.

It's a steep price to pay, but i7 isn't a cheap thing to adopt anyway and if we pay 300 notes for our graphics, then why not speed up the whole system for less?
It looks like there was an overclock on the CPU too so that might have affected at least superpi and game performance :/

19-02-2009, 10:02:30

OmegaStalker
true never had any idea that memory could add 10FPS to games...
Reply
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