AMD R9 Fury X Review

Introduction and Technical Specifications

AMD R9 Fury X Review


It's taken a while but we finally have a new, properly new, AMD GPU to review in the form of the R9 Fury X. We are sure we're not the only ones excited to see if the Fury X matches up to the GTX980Ti in the same way the R9 290X matched the GTX780Ti, and with the theoretical improvements of High Bandwidth Memory we're anxious to throw some benchmarks at the Fury X and see how it performs.

'High Bandwidth Memory', we hear you say, 'what's that?'. Assuming that you have been under a rock, or not paying attention to this very website, HBM is taking the 3D Memory chip idea that we're used to seeing in Solid State Drives, and putting it onto the GPU PCB. By having the smallest possible distance between the physical GPU and the 3D High Bandwidth Memory, and tiny spaces between each bank of DRAM AMD have ended up with an extremely compact, power efficient solution which promises massively improved bandwidth. As the gaming marketplace moves - in the high-end at least - towards demanding resolutions and Virtual Reality, so the need for immense memory bandwidth becomes a pressing one.

Whether you think that VR will revolutionise the industry, or be a flash in the pan akin to 3D displays, there is no doubt that it's coming and so manufacturers have to be ready. We're of the firm opinion that resolution is actually the future but either way the requirement of oodles of bandwidth remains. Probably the most surprising aspect of the HBM solution is the low clockspeed. GDDR5 is normally found running around the 1750MHz mark whereas AMDs HBM only pops up at 500MHz. If the performance is equivalent to GDDR5 then considering the technology is in its infancy it will prove to be the way forwards for everyone. When was the last time AMD changed the rule book?

Technical Specifications

Away from the unique memory solution the GCN at the heart of the Fury X is similar to most graphics processors. Plenty of Stream Processors, running at a fast pace, form the backbone of the AMD range and the Fury X is no exception. DirectX 12 support ensures that you can take advantage of the latest iteration of Microsofts revolutionary API. Add this to the new Virtual Super Resolution, a similar downscaling idea to the nVidia Dynamic Super Resolution, AMDs own FreeSync technology, and our favourite, Frame Rate Target Control, and there is no doubt that the Fury X has all the bells and whistles. We'll cover FRTC on the power page.

AMD R9 Fury X Review  

«Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Next»

Most Recent Comments

24-06-2015, 07:58:20


The Fury X is finally upon us and we get a chance to see how the High Bandwidth Memory coupled to the latest Radeon GPU fares against the stiff competition.

AMD R9 Fury X ReviewQuote

24-06-2015, 08:04:48

I don't think they made it so small to show off, they made it small because that's all the size it needed to be because they didn't need to spread it out to fit the memory on it like they used to, from an engineering perspective and from a customers perspective there is no reason to make something bigger if it doesn't need to be.. it would just be a waste of material and a waste of money.Quote

24-06-2015, 08:06:02

£509 on overclockers . but there is a £140 premium on the ones that are in stock

edit all sold out within 30min
and the 980ti is £509 this weeks only offerQuote

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.