EVGA SR-X Classified Review

Introduction and Technical Specifications

EVGA SR-X Classified Review  

Introduction

Now and again you get a bit of hardware that goes down in folklore, bringing burly men to their knees in misty-eyed reminiscence, and the original LGA1366 EVGA SR-2 was one such item.

It burst upon the scene with dual-CPU slots, Quad-SLI potential, and very rapidly showed itself to be the choice for world-record breaking benchmark runs.

So you can imagine the excitement in the OC3D office when we got word that a new model was going to be launched, based upon the massively speedy LGA2011 processors. We couldn't wait to get our hands on it, and as the days ticked down our anticipation grew to fever pitch. Then, just before ours arrived, we heard the first whisperings of discontent from those who had already received theirs. Never a site to let the rumour mill sway our opinion, we finally got ours and set about putting it through the wringer.

So is this a colossus of a sequel to the mighty SR-2, or the sophomore slump?


Technical Specifications

We always pull our technical specifications direct from the manufacturer, and we have to confess that the paucity of information available on the EVGA website doesn't exactly fill us with hope. We're no silicon giants, but if we had a top-end product to try and sell you on we'd do a better job than this. It's akin to us announcing the Xmas Compo without telling you the prizes, entry dates, or how you win.

But hey, if you've got the thick end of 3 large ones to spend on a system, the finer details are unlikely to be a bother. Nobody asks the valve sizes on a Veyron do they.

Performance
Based on Intel C606 chipset
Supports Dual QPI Socket 2011 Intel Xeon E5 Processors
 
Memory
12 x 240-pin DIMM sockets
Quad Channel DDR3
Maximum of 96GB of DDR3 1600MHz+

Storage I/O
4 x Serial ATA 300MB/sec (4x Internal) with support for RAID 0, RAID1, RAID 0+1, RAID5, RAID10 and JBOD
4 x Serial ATA 600MB/sec (2x Internal + 2x E-SATA) with support for RAID 0 and RAID 1

Integrated Peripherals
8 Channel High Definition
2 x 10/100/1000 LAN

Multi I/O
1 x PS2 Keyboard
6 x USB3.0 ports
10 x USB2.0 ports
Audio connector (Line-in, Line-out, MIC)
FireWire 1394B (1 external)

Form Factor
HPTX Form Factor
Length: 13.6in - 345.4mm
Width: 15in - 381mm

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Most Recent Comments

22-06-2012, 05:58:53

tinytomlogan


We finally get our hands on the sequel to the insane EVGA SR2, the much anticipated EVGA SR-X Classified.

Continue Reading

22-06-2012, 06:07:31

Firat
What a let down :/

22-06-2012, 06:12:14

SieB
Shocking that the Asus board is better than this, especially with EVGA's track record with the SR2.

22-06-2012, 06:22:02

KING_OF_SAND
COOL PINK!

It will look great with the ugly collection of Nctua fans I have! I can make the UGLY TACKY RIG!

22-06-2012, 06:30:59

Rastalovich
This smells of not being a finished product. I envisage a re-review in a number of months.

22-06-2012, 06:31:53

DT-525
I never understand why anybody would buy a board like this. 500 for a mobo you could spend that money on a 7970 or a 680 that what matters when gaming. the graphics cards are a lot more important no need for two CPU's that are going to cost you 3000.

22-06-2012, 06:33:12

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rastalovich View Post

This smells of not being a finished product. I envisage a re-review in a number of months.
I dont think Ill be wanting to spend any more time on it. Theyd need to redo a lot more than the performance to make this worthwhile spending days on it testing again.

22-06-2012, 06:42:23

MerryMustu
Asus = Pure quality. But sometimes their motherboards can be all gimmicky and they advertise all sorts of different useless gimmicks to please the crowd. Really need to work on their marketing strategy and highlight the right features instead of the useless gimmicks. My honest opinion.

22-06-2012, 06:57:49

dotems
I don't understand how they could let a board like this go to market in this state, its an important lesson in waiting for reviews but I still feel bad for all the evga supporters who have gone out and gotten what really is a sup par product in its category.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DT-525 View Post

I never understand why anybody would buy a board like this. 500 for a mobo you could spend that money on a 7970 or a 680 that what matters when gaming. the graphics cards are a lot more important no need for two CPU's that are going to cost you 3000.
People who buy this kind of thing aren't looking for just gaming performance, they either want to end because building top end PCs is a passion and a hobby or they need it for intensive rendering and the like as was mentioned in the review.

22-06-2012, 07:47:56

airdeano
not to make excuses, but the release of keplar, Z77 and Ivey, world economy representing dumped sales...

kind of a scramble to keep the ship ship-shaped?? its kinda been a teaser year so far, without epic

blow-overs in performance support. small incriments of increase delivery.. just saying..

airdeano

22-06-2012, 07:51:41

SPS
Tom, you talked a lot about cable management in this video but do you not think that people who would actually put money into this would be buying it purely for a dedicated specialised task and not really care what the system looked like inside? (Although I do know that many people will just buy hardware like this because they can)

22-06-2012, 08:37:11

hmmblah
Ouch, what a complete disappointment.

22-06-2012, 08:45:49

B NEGATIVE
EVGA said themselves about the SR-2 that the SATA ports are this way to reduce the footprint...cant see much changing there

Also,BIOS 15 has been released which has improved it greatly..

But,more importantly,no SR-2 comparison?

22-06-2012, 09:49:27

dugdiamond
well, well, well.... here's a first........ beta-hardware!!!

i am soooooooooo glad i didn't go down this route

22-06-2012, 12:50:08

coolmiester
This MIPS block might get around the battery issue

ETA around week 26/27 and nickel pom around week 28/29

http://www.coolercases.co.uk/SR-X/sr-x_mips.jpg

http://www.coolercases.co.uk/SR-X/sr-x_mips_1.jpg

24-06-2012, 19:16:10

murphy7801
it seems pretty overpriced for what you get

03-07-2012, 13:07:52

AverageNinja
I expected so much from this board. And the ASUS one isn't on the market yet
Shame for those who want a dual 2011 xeon build

03-07-2012, 13:15:48

dipzy
Such a great board but such a let down. I guess for some, the sr2 may still be the better route for a dual xeon setup even though its been out for a few years

03-07-2012, 14:19:16

CPMFW
disappointing!!!!

11-07-2012, 12:19:34

Fallout3
Very odd this.

Whilst I can see the advantages of being able to run two Xeons on the same board (for sheer core count alone) the fact that the new Xeons are un-clockable makes this a strange idea.

To make it worthwhile you would need to buy two Xeons with huge core counts which immediately starts to get very expensive, then you realise that new Xeons are really just the same Sandybridge/Ivybridge CPUs as their desktop counterparts in slightly different flavours (IE - The E3 1220 has the same core count as the I5 2500 but the L3 cache of the I7 2600 with ECC support) .

But the fact remains that other than different cache levels and core counts they are just Sandy/Ivy CPUs underneath it all.

Which begs the question (to me at least) why EVGA have bothered with the Xeons this time around given that you can't clock them, at all

Surely it would have been a better idea to make a board that can support multiple insert regular old chip model here on the same board and have the ability to clock them

I remember at the end of the 90s and into the early noughties several budget type boards that could take multiple CPUs (two usually was the norm). The difference, though, was that these boards could take anything that would fit. At that time it was a choice of Celerons or Coppermine flip chip P3s. You could then up the bus clocks and gain slight overclocks out of them which all made sense if you used Windows 2000.

Abit were the kings of it, and the price was good too, about 140 IIRC.

Not only that but you could use bog standard SDRAM modules too, with no need for ECC support. So I guess that's what I am finding hard to figure out here. Why didn't EVGA design a board that you could throw two 2500ks (for example) onto and then clock them?

And the price? well it's ridiculous. P77 or whatever they are called (and P67 etc) boards don't cost that much. Not like a 2011 or the 1366 before it.

So the only thing this board has going for it is the ability to run a pair of (example) 1500 processors for sheer core count.

Which kind of rules out the enthusiast as there's no gains to be had, and no special techniques to set any records with. All you need is a huge bank balance and a large dose of stupidity.

Which makes it all a bit pointless really. Even more pointless that companies like Supermicro make boards just like this one for around the same price.

11-07-2012, 17:26:42

B NEGATIVE
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fallout3 View Post
Very odd this.

Whilst I can see the advantages of being able to run two Xeons on the same board (for sheer core count alone) the fact that the new Xeons are un-clockable makes this a strange idea.

To make it worthwhile you would need to buy two Xeons with huge core counts which immediately starts to get very expensive, then you realise that new Xeons are really just the same Sandybridge/Ivybridge CPUs as their desktop counterparts in slightly different flavours (IE - The E3 1220 has the same core count as the I5 2500 but the L3 cache of the I7 2600 with ECC support) .

But the fact remains that other than different cache levels and core counts they are just Sandy/Ivy CPUs underneath it all.

Which begs the question (to me at least) why EVGA have bothered with the Xeons this time around given that you can't clock them, at all

Surely it would have been a better idea to make a board that can support multiple insert regular old chip model here on the same board and have the ability to clock them

I remember at the end of the 90s and into the early noughties several budget type boards that could take multiple CPUs (two usually was the norm). The difference, though, was that these boards could take anything that would fit. At that time it was a choice of Celerons or Coppermine flip chip P3s. You could then up the bus clocks and gain slight overclocks out of them which all made sense if you used Windows 2000.

Abit were the kings of it, and the price was good too, about 140 IIRC.

Not only that but you could use bog standard SDRAM modules too, with no need for ECC support. So I guess that's what I am finding hard to figure out here. Why didn't EVGA design a board that you could throw two 2500ks (for example) onto and then clock them?

And the price? well it's ridiculous. P77 or whatever they are called (and P67 etc) boards don't cost that much. Not like a 2011 or the 1366 before it.

So the only thing this board has going for it is the ability to run a pair of (example) 1500 processors for sheer core count.

Which kind of rules out the enthusiast as there's no gains to be had, and no special techniques to set any records with. All you need is a huge bank balance and a large dose of stupidity.

Which makes it all a bit pointless really. Even more pointless that companies like Supermicro make boards just like this one for around the same price.
The standard i series chips dont have the dual QPI links for multi CPU support.
The SR 2 doesnt require ECC ram either

13-07-2012, 16:10:21

RyanAndrew
I guess for some, the sr2 may still be the better route for a dual xeon setup even though its been out for a few years
Reply
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