Asus vs Gigabyte Intel H67 Review

Flash HD, 3DMark & Games

Asus vs Gigabyte Intel H67 Shoot Out

 

This is where we started to test the Core i5 2300's Integrated GPU. By default the GPU operates at 850MHz (1100MHz) turbo, which we were able to adjust to 1700MHz. The module is not supposed to be a Crysis Warhead killer however we are hoping to show that it will cater for general media (high definition) and light gaming.

Flash HD - Youtube.com


Watching Flash based High Definition video is often more tasking on a system than you'd be led to believe. Let's see how our test setup performs here.

As shown with utilisation of ~25%, this processor and iGPU pairing has no trouble playing 1080p video without any stutters.

3DMark Vantage

3DMark Vantage is Futuremarks flagship gaming oriented benchmark at present and is considered to be a demanding one at that. Our tests were carried out under the "Performance" prefix.

Interestingly the Gigabyte did not have a brilliant 3DMark run at default frequencies. It did however spring back to life once overclocked, matching the Asus score.

The results themselves are suitably promising with GPU scores that suggest similar performance to the Radeon HD 5450 and GeForce 9500GT. For most users, this is a more than ample amount of GPU grunt.

Resident Evil 5

RE5 is the latest 3rd party shooter of the collection, released in 2009. With the graphical settings dropped to modest levels, perhaps the Intel HD graphics will survive.

 

As expected, DirectX 10 causes a performance hit over DX9 mode, however in both cases the Intel HD Graphics module was quite playable with a larger distribution of frame rates sitting around the 30-35fps mark. For a setup that is not designed for modern games, this is a very reasonable result.

Medal of Honour

We wonder if Medal of Honour stood a chance of coping...

We weren't so lucky with MoH as minimum framerates plummeted mercilessly close to single figures. While both platforms performed identically, it certainly does not serve as a suitable configuration for this game.

Let's wrap this one up.

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Most Recent Comments

04-01-2011, 23:20:38

tinytomlogan
So you're looking to build an entry level Sandy Bridge computer; which H67 board will win?

Continue Reading

05-01-2011, 02:02:05

taz838
Grrr no overclocking, disgraceful little motherboard.

No integrated graphics for me then :'(

05-01-2011, 03:12:17

chudley
Co9uld it be possible that CPU OCing will be available via a bios upgrade with these boards?

05-01-2011, 03:18:34

Zeals
Quote:
Originally Posted by chudley View Post

Co9uld it be possible that CPU OCing will be available via a bios upgrade with these boards?
Doubt it, I think the H67 motherboards are aimed at people that don't know or want to overclock, so they will purchase the non "K" CPUs.

05-01-2011, 09:26:23

Rastalovich
I like the look of these (not just these two) for building pcs for other people.

The price may massage, but it all looks nice and handy to me.

05-01-2011, 10:37:28

benj3
A bit pricey imo for a board that is not going to appeal to basically the majority of the people with some knowledge of PC's apart from maybe people whom make/build PC's for customers. But still if I was building a computer for a simpleton whom only wanted to use it for internet/emails etc I would go with a cheaper board.

Edit*

Although saying that supporting GPU for a internet/email and some simple games user could completely eliminate the need to buy a graphics card which would save an extra £100ish but does it add up? £50 Mobo, £70 CPU & £80 GPU or £120 Mobo, £150 CPU £200 vs £270 for a everyday pc Ofcourse the sandybridge option will run smoother but is it worth the extra £70 :x!

18-01-2011, 09:11:10

VicVanGo
This review lists your test setup as using Mushkin Redline DDR3 @ 1333MHz but it looks like Mushkin Redline DDR3 is rated for 1600MHz. Is it possible to run the RAM at 1600MHz (or higher) on these boards? From what I have read, the H67 chipset can allow memory OCs but I haven't been able to tell if any of the mobo makers have allowed it yet.
Reply
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