Thermaltake Frio Review

Introduction

Thermaltake Frio Review

Introduction  

Introductions can be very hard to write, and it doesn't get easier with a well known company like Thermaltake. If anything it's harder because your audience pretty much know it all anyways, so I'll save some time and fill some real estate with a copy and paste from their website.

Since the beginning of Thermaltake in 1999, it has been at the forefront of creating new and exciting products at a time where most computer users were provided little to no choices for components that may seem irrelevant, but in reality crucial to the performance of a PC.

Thermaltake Server Series solutions, with years of thermal experience and industry leadership, sets its goal on reforming total thermal management in server segment by formulating the perfect mixture of versatility, efficiency and thermal management with each respective server product category: Rackmount Chassis, Server Fixed & Redundant Power Supply and Server CPU Cooling Management Solutions.

With its comprehensive line of products available, it enables Thermaltake's core customers to enjoy a one-stop-shop experience, reduce product design-in evaluation period and most important of all, flawless integration process. Each of Thermaltake's strengths enables its customer to focus on their core business while taking advantage of the skills and efficiency of a single thermal management solution partner.

On the menu today is their latest CPU heat sink the Frio, labelled as a cooler for overclockers in our eyes it has a lot to live up to, lets glance over the paper statistics.

Heatsink Dimension   

139(L) x 98(W) x 165(H) mm

Heatsink Material   Aluminum Fins
Aluminum & Copper Base
Heatpipe   Ø 8mm x 5
Fan Dimension   120(L) x 120(H) x 25(W) mm
Fan Speed   1,200 ~ 2,500 RPM
Bearing Type   ----
Noise Level   20 ~ 43 dBA
Max. Air Flow   101.6 CFM
Max. Air Pressure   4.2 mmH2O
LED Fan   ----
Power Connector   3 Pin
Rated Voltage   12 V
Started Voltage   6 V
Rated Current   0.5 A
Power Input   6 W
MTBF   50,000 Hrs @ 40℃
Weight   1,042 g


Enough with the delays, let's move on and give this new cooler a look.

«Prev 1 2 3 4 Next»

Most Recent Comments

18-05-2010, 05:09:02

tinytomlogan
Looking for a new CPU cooler? Its time for the Thermaltake Frio to pass through the OC3D scrutineering process.

Continue Reading

18-05-2010, 15:37:55

AMDFTW
shame it doesent perform very well,just wondering how much heat does the i7 chip produce over the phenom 2 as ive heard the phenoms have a lower temp when vs the i7's

18-05-2010, 15:55:48

tinytomlogan
I still wouldnt buy it though. Why would you want to when there are better performing sinks for the same money?

18-05-2010, 16:01:54

ppuff
Looks hot! Too bad it keeps your chip hot though

18-05-2010, 16:45:13

hadesan
I thought aluminum and copper reacted to each other over time...

18-05-2010, 16:55:08

tinytomlogan
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='hadesan'
I thought aluminum and copper reacted to each other over time...
Really needs water to make it bad dude

19-05-2010, 10:59:05

inspiredminduk
Looks very much like the V8
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.