Thermaltake DH 104


If you are purchasing a case like the DH 104, you are obviously not getting it for its cooling capacity. Cooling is still important, but we wanted to focus more on its functions as a HTPC, as these are far more important in a living room PC.
DH104 Screen DH104 LCD
After the initial boot, you can extend your desktop onto the LCD. Once you have got the screen working, you can press on with installing the supplied software. After installation has completed sucessfully you will need to calibrate the screen by pressing a series of crosses.
DH104 Front View DH104 Front View
Once you have set this up, you are confronted with 'Front view'. This displays latest news, CPU usage, the time and various other pieces of information, some more useful that others.
DH104 LCD front view setup DH104 LCD setup
Going into the menu lets you select another task. You can also change settings for the screen, as well as change what the front view displays. If you leave it in the menu for around 30 seconds without touching anything, the screen will default back to front view.
DH104- Music DH104- Library
DH104- Now playing
Performing a task, such as opening an image, playing music or watching a video follows pretty much the same process. You first select the task, such as 'Music'. You are then presented with your library. Unfortunately, we couldn't get ours to sync with our iTunes library properly. However, once we'd got a song or two loaded, you are presented with the 'now playing' screen.
Once we'd had a play with the screen, we set about a 20-minute torture test. This involved 4 instances of Prime95 as well as artifact scanning with ATI Tool. During the testing, the case remained pleasantly quiet, with the loudest part being the hard disks. Although Raptors are loud, we were surprised we could still hear them with the anti-vibration stoppers installed. Temperatures were then taken with Everest Ultimate Edition after the 20 minutes:
 DH104 Temps
Looking at the graph above, it would seem the air within the DH 104 got to around 60°C. Either that or all the components selected had incredibly close load temperatures. Despite the high temperatures however, the case kept the system perfectly stable, and we were not subject to throttling or any BSODs.

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Most Recent Comments

27-11-2008, 11:34:02

Today we took a look at the DH104 from Thermaltake, after a while with the case we have been left with mixed feeling.

Read the Full review here.Quote

27-11-2008, 12:26:28

very nice looking case i must say

but £300 ...phew...bit much aint it

200 would be a better price point for it

especially in this credit crunch, people want cheep and cheerfulQuote

27-11-2008, 12:34:02

Originally Posted by name='ionicle'
very nice looking case i must say

but £300 ...phew...bit much aint it

200 would be a better price point for it

especially in this credit crunch, people want cheep and cheerful
Yup, thats exactly what I fealt.. I think the Non LCD VFD based case will be a lot cheaper, and thats the one to buy!Quote

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