Silverstone Grandia GD02-MT Case

Testing the Case

Testing the Case
  
We tested the case for it's cooling ability and for the levels of noise generated by the supplied cooling solution. To measure temperatures, I used Sisoft Sandra Engineer's Edition, and without any proper noise metering gadgets I had to rely on my ears to gauge noise levels. I recorded the CPU, motherboard and auxillary temperatures, and set fan speeds using the QFan feature within the motherboard's BIOS. I also noted the noise output at the different speeds too.
 
The range of fan speeds available with QFan were as follows:
  • Silent
  • Optimal
  • Performance
The components used to build the PC were as follows:
  • Asus P57NA-VM Socket 775 - Nvidia nForce 730i Chipset
  • Intel Pentium Dual Core E2200 with stock air cooler run at default clock of 2.2GHz
  • Geil Ultra DDR2-800 2x1GB at stock settings
  • Hitachi SATA II 150Gb HD
  • Powercolor ATI HD4850 with stock air cooler, run at stock speeds
  • Thermaltake Toughpower 750w Modular PSU
  • Windows Vista 64 SP1
GD02-MT Case cooling results at idle
 
GD02-MT Case cooling results under load
 
The results were taken from Sisioft Sandra Engineers Edtion. As you can see from the results, the cooling supplied by Silverstone is adequate, but there would be little room for overclocking. 
 
 
Noise output of the case fans
 
The noise generated by the two 80mm fans was not as bad as I originally feared. As one of the important neccessities of a HTPC is quiet operation,a noisy HTPC can ruin the experience of watching a movie or the TV. I did have some concerns over Silverstone's choice of fan size. Larger fans generate less noise and 80mm fans can be quite whiny sometimes.
 
The noise generated with the fan speed set to silent within the BIOS made the noise generated difficult to distinguish from the hard drive and CPU fan noise, so it would be very acceptable when the PC is in use within the lounge.
 
With the fan speeds set to optimal, the noise was barely any different from when they were set to silent.
 
At performance speed setting, the fans were very noticeable. At this level they would definitely prove a distraction when the PC was being used for media purposes.
 
All in all, the cooling abilty and noise output were acceptable. A HTPC doesn't have to have very powerful (and hot running) components to be able to function well, and in that respect the case will be more than adequate for cooling and noise levels.
 
Let's now move on to our final conclusions, on the next page.
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Most Recent Comments

16-11-2008, 11:09:58

TopSecret
Silverstone's new media centre friendly case gets put under the microscope today in our full review.

http://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/artic...161342648l.jpg

Read the full article here.Quote

16-11-2008, 12:04:07

Luigi
Nice review there, Similar to what ive got atm, the thermaltake DH104...

I found the LCD to be a real dissapointment, took me ages for it to actually find my media, and then I had to use the desktop app to get at it as the LCD didnt find it :S

Anyway, nice one once again stuart!Quote

16-11-2008, 17:06:57

TopSecret
Thanks mate.Quote
Reply
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