Microcool Mosfet Chipsink

Mounting

Mounting

 

The Microcool heatsink has a white, soft thermal pad. Making good contact and adhering to the chip is always important. You don't want to hear the heatsinks drop off your card when you're gaming, now do you. The culprit, my X1800XT. Everyone knows the X1K series card's are pretty much the hottest running cards out there. Overclock them and they're unbelievable. For most people, the voltage regulation area of the card runs the hottest, or the mosfet area. This can cause instability, artifacting, or even pre-mature death of the card. Let's mount these heatsinks, shall we?

 

With one mounted to make sure it had good contact, I continued to mount the rest. It's very simple. Just take the heatsink, set it on the chip carefully, and apply pressure for a few seconds. With all of them on, it looks good! They're a bit un-even, but you don't see them anyway.

 

I oriented them a certain way to the airflow from my side fan would pass through them, making sure they get the job done right.

 

While I was at it, I decided to sink my vDimm mosfet, too. You can view before & after pictures above. Anyway, on to testing!!
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Most Recent Comments

22-05-2006, 16:56:46

NickS
They perform great, suprisingly. You can read the review here.

Nick

22-05-2006, 17:19:25

Raven

When they get hot, they can cause voltage fluctuation which can make your computer unstable at a certain point.



the warmer mosfets gets the less power can flow through them so im not so sure the voltage starts to fluctuate but more gets lower but can be wrong.

22-05-2006, 18:03:15

NickS
Yeh, I read wikipedia's (i think) definition and paraphrased it.

Nick

23-05-2006, 07:53:14

systech
that's made from alumunium right? if that's made from copper,is better i think.. (cause cooper 3x alumunium in heat spreading i think)

later,

23-05-2006, 09:13:11

Raven
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='systech'
that's made from alumunium right? if that's made from copper,is better i think.. (cause cooper 3x alumunium in heat spreading i think)
depends on.

aluminium is better than copper to transfer heat to the air so with a low airflow aluminium is better.

you can se the same thing in reviews on the zalman 7000b.

at the lowest fan setting the alcu performs the same as the cu but at max fan settings the cu is roughly 2 celsius better.

23-05-2006, 09:18:15

FarFarAway
Yep and 'fets get low-flow usually so these will be pretty effective

23-05-2006, 10:23:53

blackrain
nicks whats that black zalmann thing mounted near your pci slots?

23-05-2006, 10:24:37

FarFarAway
Its a Zalman fan bracket mate

23-05-2006, 10:27:27

blackrain
o right didnt know they made such things! i was trying to get all that hot air from my GFX down at the bottom of my case away.... perfect!

23-05-2006, 10:47:10

Raven

23-05-2006, 13:19:26

Ham
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven
aluminium is better than copper to transfer heat to the air so with a low airflow aluminium is better.
Wtf. What principals (sp?) have you based that on?

23-05-2006, 13:59:36

Raven
i base it on 2 things.

several reviews claiming the alcu and cu version of the zalman 7000 performs basicly the same with fan at lowest setting and cu being around 1-2celsius better with the fan at full speed but also that i read a couple of times that aluminium has better heat dissipation and copper best heat transfer.

23-05-2006, 14:02:07

Ham
Hmm odd. having just finished my A level phyisics corse and myself done experiments involving the SHC and SLH values of both al and cu. I think that copper is better full stop. spray a copper block black and your sorted.

24-05-2006, 11:32:12

blackrain
yea i was going to give a lecture on a-level physics and some degree level chemistry on thermal conductivity but i thought i would bore people!

24-05-2006, 11:34:45

FarFarAway
Yeah well lets just say that Copper conducts heat better shall we?

25-05-2006, 06:14:13

PV5150
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='blackrain'
yea i was going to give a lecture on a-level physics and some degree level chemistry on thermal conductivity
I'll see your A-level physics and degree level Chemistry and raise it... .In this context, it all comes down to the requirement for a low coefficient of thermal expansion or CTE. Sure, Cu is great as a thermal conductor but it has a high CTE. In order for superior heat dissipation to occur both the heatsink and chip substrate/IHS need to have a low CTE. Due to the need for 'lightweight' materials to be used on PCB's etc, a materials density comes into play, and this is why Al is quite often used due to it being so light. But Cu definitely has far superior thermal conductivity and lower CTE than Al. Further, if we bring another player into the equation, carbon/ carbon fibre has the added bonus of being corrosion/oxididation resistant, when compared to Cu and Al. HS manufacturers should a bring out a copper composite heatsink, using either carbon fibre or molybdenum, but I'm sure the cost would far outway the benefits LOL. Copper is better, but we are only commenting on mosfets

25-05-2006, 06:38:38

FarFarAway
Yep put in laymens terms:

Copper transfers heat better but Aluminium weighs less.

All in all their mosfets + memory coolers so it doesn't really matter

25-05-2006, 07:56:10

PV5150
Yep roger that

25-05-2006, 10:02:33

systech
roger that!!

25-05-2006, 10:08:26

llwyd
If you got the money you could get a platinum plated HS with mercury filled heatpipes........that would be mad (A level chem and phys also )

Also. aluminium probably seems better at low airflow as it very often has a matt finish

26-05-2006, 04:09:02

systech
i think...according that's basic,i know the reason why intel's stock cooler is combined by al and cu.
Reply
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