Fluid XP+ HP Watercooling Fluid

Conclusion

Conclusion

If you're thinking of venturing into the water cooling scene for the first time but are worried about the risks involved, then Fluid XP+ could well be the answer to your problems. As the video shows, powered components submerged in Fluid XP+ are fully capable of working again after being given time to dry. Protection that you wouldn't normally get with de-ionised water or other conductive solutions.

In addition to this, Fluid XP+ also has very similar thermal performance to untreated water, making it a great candidate for those of us who want the improved temperatures associated with plain water but without the algae and corrosion.

Priced at £26.99 per litre over at SpecialTech , Fluid XP+ certainly isn't cheap. However, if you want to decrease the chances of killing your precious hardware in the event of a leak then Fluid XP+ could well be a worthwhile investment.


Pro's
• Performance as good as plain water.
• Long life of around 5 years.
• Available in lots of UV colours.
• Components covered in Fluid XP+ will live to see another day.

Con's
• Very Expensive
• Results show it still has an effect on electrical components.


Innovation Award


Thanks to the guys at SpecialTech for making this review possible.

Discuss this review in our forums .

«Prev 1 2 3 Next»

Most Recent Comments

15-01-2007, 05:37:59

JN
"Fluid XP+ may have been around for some time but today we've been given an oportunity to test its thermal properties and conductivity. Is it worth its hefty price tag? We find out."

Link

15-01-2007, 06:13:58

Dav0s
i dont think its worth all that money just for the cleanliness, it didnt make any difference at all to temps. I know its a pain but id rather clean out the loop every couple of weeks than pay £30 a time for some XP

nice writeup mate

15-01-2007, 06:15:16

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Dav0s'
i dont think its worth all that money just for the cleanliness, it didnt make any difference at all to temps. I know its a pain but id rather clean out the loop every couple of weeks than pay £30 a time for some XP

nice writeup mate
The low conductivity is where it's at tho. Plus u won't get temps lower than plain water really (unless you wanna pump liquid metal).

But ye- its expensive fo sure.

15-01-2007, 06:28:23

FarFarAway
I'd rather spend ~£3 on some water and ~£5 on some Zerex and then be able to re-fill my loop for like 2 years

However it's gotta be useful for those who can't be bothered

15-01-2007, 07:53:40

shiftlocked
Wouldnt it be fair to say that this is more aimed at those who arent in the know and want hassle free solution. Ive never heard of Zerez tbh, or what ratios I'd need to use and stuff like that.

Whenever people see my wc rig they ask wont it break if water spills onto it, so its got its place on the market

15-01-2007, 07:57:44

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Kempez™'
I'd rather spend ~£3 on some water and ~£5 on some Zerex and then be able to re-fill my loop for like 2 years

However it's gotta be useful for those who can't be bothered
I suppose another way to look at it is: Zerex + Water should really be replaced in your water loop once every 6 months. A bottle of Zerex @ £5 will only be good for one application (in a mid sized loop). So 5 years worth of Zerex + water will cost you close to £50.

15-01-2007, 08:16:54

Toxcity
I can live with my distilled water....

15-01-2007, 09:04:08

FarFarAway
Nah a £5-6 bottle of Zerex lasts me about 3 applications = 1.5yrs, water = £3 for what 4 years at least

£25 in one go, or ~ £20 over 5 years?

I know which one I'd rather have

15-01-2007, 09:08:00

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Kempez™'
Nah a £5-6 bottle of Zerex lasts me about 3 applications = 1.5yrs, water = £3 for what 4 years at least

£25 in one go, or ~ £20 over 5 years?

I know which one I'd rather have
Zerex comes in 50ml bottles and needs to be split 1:20 with water. So for every litre of water you need 50ml of Zerex. My loop takes a full 1l of water and it's nothing special.

15-01-2007, 09:16:53

llwyd
I just whacked a whole bottle of alphacool coolant into 4L of water and use that. Its been running for several months without any buildup of anything. Actually discovered yesterday that some had leaked out of a poorly tightened barb and onto my sound card. Somehow it didnt short anything out

15-01-2007, 09:17:10

FarFarAway
OKOK I give up!

aint buying it tho!

15-01-2007, 09:24:55

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='llwyd'
I just whacked a whole bottle of alphacool coolant into 4L of water and use that. Its been running for several months without any buildup of anything. Actually discovered yesterday that some had leaked out of a poorly tightened barb and onto my sound card. Somehow it didnt short anything out
Yeah i used the Tec protect stuff for quite a while. It started off pink, and then went clear which was handy so i could put some UV in it

15-01-2007, 09:28:42

ai_01
its cheaper in the US, its 10 GBP or 20 US for a bottle, still a lil expensive, iv used MCT-5 and now im on blue penotosin which i love.

05-03-2009, 16:58:38

ITGUY
I'm sorry to say gang, that this product is NOT safe for electronics. It FRIED my video card, and I made a video of it last night of me pouring it directly into an open power supply. I had 5" flames shooting out of it in 5 seconds or so.

I've contacted the company about it and asked them to relabel it with a warning that is unsafe for electronics, but they've grown somewhat arrogant about it and referred me to their "legal" department.

Do NOT buy this stuff, if it leaks on your cards, POOF. Look around on Youtube, there are plenty of other videos showing the same thing that I witnessed.

Rock on.....

05-03-2009, 17:21:23

w3bbo
Post the video tbh

05-03-2009, 17:25:39

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='ITGUY'
I'm sorry to say gang, that this product is NOT safe for electronics. It FRIED my video card, and I made a video of it last night of me pouring it directly into an open power supply. I had 5" flames shooting out of it in 5 seconds or so.

I've contacted the company about it and asked them to relabel it with a warning that is unsafe for electronics, but they've grown somewhat arrogant about it and referred me to their "legal" department.

Do NOT buy this stuff, if it leaks on your cards, POOF. Look around on My space, there are plenty of other videos showing the same thing that I witnessed.

Rock on.....

I dont think you will find any product available on the market (for less than £200 a bottle) that is entirely non-conductive. It is the nature of almost all normal liquids to become ionised and thus conductive after coming into contact with air.

If you really want true non-conductivity then pump dielectric oil round your rig, or that stupidly expensive stuff that 3M make. I still wouldnt want to test it out by dripping it on an open PSU tho...

05-03-2009, 17:35:47

ITGUY
I would LOVE to publish the video, I'm looking into that now. It's three videos that are 15 meg each...gotta find a way to make one long one and stream it, like youtube. I'm looking into that tonight.

05-03-2009, 19:01:09

cl0ck_ed
Lol, an open psu has 240v going through it. it is much more sensitive than a 12v gfx/mobo.

06-03-2009, 05:01:24

FarFarAway
With all due respect, puring liquid into a device that holds enough voltage to kill you is monumentally stupid, I don't think they can re-lable a product to cater for people who will endanger their own lives.

This product is advertised on low conductivity, not no conductivity. Care has to be taken when using it, same as anything else in a computer application.

06-03-2009, 05:17:11

JN
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Kempez'
With all due respect, puring liquid into a device that holds enough voltage to kill you is monumentally stupid, I don't think they can re-lable a product to cater for people who will endanger their own lives.

This product is advertised on low conductivity, not no conductivity. Care has to be taken when using it, same as anything else in a computer application.
QFT.

I've actually used this stuff for quite a few of my builds and have even got it on a graphics card and a motherboard in the past. Providing you notice it early and cut the power straight away, all it ever took was a few hours with the hairdryer to get it working again.

06-03-2009, 06:25:47

cl0ck_ed
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Jim'
QFT.

I've actually used this stuff for quite a few of my builds and have even got it on a graphics card and a motherboard in the past. Providing you notice it early and cut the power straight away, all it ever took was a few hours with the hairdryer to get it working again.
Thats it. With a low voltage of a pc at 12v, it is very difficult to short with water/liquid. There is a youtube vid, of a guy pouring de-ionised water on a pc, and the mobo was swimming before it short.

If a leak is caught early on, a small amount of coolent shouldn't be a problem.

06-03-2009, 08:06:09

HypoglossalXII
Honestly, for that price, it should be Jesus Juice. Most of the coolants in the market are already non-conducive so I wouldn't be hecked to pay that much for this.

If you're new to water cooling, your worry should be in checking, double checking, and triple checking for leaks first, also get those screw-nuts that attach tubing with holes to ensure tight and secure connections.

-HypoG

06-03-2009, 18:51:06

ITGUY
Kempez

With respect as well......you're wrong on a few points.

"With all due respect, puring liquid into a device that holds enough voltage to kill you is monumentally stupid, I don't think they can re-lable a product to cater for people who will endanger their own lives.

This product is advertised on low conductivity, not no conductivity. Care has to be taken when using it, same as anything else in a computer application."

1) Using this product in a computer with the risk of it leaking is monumentally stupid. Yes. Power supply or not, shorting anything inside the case will endanger you, AND the equipment.

2) No, it is NOT advertised as "low conductivity", it's PLAINLY labeled on the bottle "NON CONDUCTIVE", and even on their website they brag about it being safe to use in computer equipment with NO chance of an electrical short.

3) If you notice, the bottle's plastic, so pouring it into a live power supply is NOT dangerous, unless you're careless enough to spill some on YOU. Then yes, you needed a dose of reality anyhow, BUT, you're insulated from the hazard, so the "people who will risk their own lives" is completey blown out of proportion.

It almost sounds like you work for the company, why else would you endorse a product PROVEN to cause electronics to EXPLODE? Mind you, there were 5" inch FLAMES coming out of this thing. And, exactly how is one supposed to be right there the second a leak occurs?!?!?! That's purely ignorant. I came downstairs one morning from sleeping all night while it was running the nightly backup, and the video card was fried. What is one supposed to do to protect the flawed reputation of this company, never take your eyes off the computer?!?!?!?!?!?

Please, be reasonable. The product sucks. If you want to use it go ahead, it's your money. I'm just warning the folks that DON'T want to spend time with a hair dryer OR time in the return line PRAYING for a refund that this product is NOT what it's clearly labeled INCORRECTLY to be.

Your call.

06-03-2009, 19:03:27

Ham
I could sit here and pick holes in arguments as you seem intent on. But I'm not going to.

I will, however, give you this advice:

Publish your video and post your warning. Then Leave it at that.

Trying to pick holes in an admin's opinion will not end well.

06-03-2009, 19:11:56

ITGUY
Ham

I'm not here to agree with an admin. I'm here to voice an opinion based on fact.

If the admin thinks the already published videos out there are wrong, that's his opinion. He's welcomed to it, as I AM MINE.

If he wants to censor others opinions, then this whole site and forum are a waste of time.

I thought we were all exchanging ideas and experiences? How about focusing on the facts and leave the judgment at the door.

'nuff said.

06-03-2009, 19:20:43

Ham
Well you've voiced your opinion. Now publish your proof.

Posting using enlarged text, capital letters and copious amounts of punctuation is not going to help you at all.

06-03-2009, 19:31:08

ITGUY
Can't post the proof. I just got a message "You are only allowed to post URLs to other sites after you have made 15 posts or more."

So be it.

I'm over this censorship. If you want to buy this junk and burn up you're rig, have at it.

I'm done trying to HELP you all avoid a catastrophe.

Later.

06-03-2009, 19:34:19

Ham
Post the link with the http:// and if nessicary the .com/co.uk removed. Nothing you have said has been censored, your being hampered by the spambot protections, yes. But no-one is censoring your posts.

06-03-2009, 19:44:00

ITGUY
With pleasure.

<>

The quality of it SUCKS, I was going to do a good one this weekend with some professional equipment that I didn't have with me at the time I took this one. BUT, you asked for it so I'll post it now.

Well, it STILL got kicked out. Just go to youtube and type in fluidxp+ in the search window. Mine's the fourth one down. It's the dark one...again...sorry about that, I would have preferred to post a better one.

06-03-2009, 19:47:22

Ham

06-03-2009, 20:06:58

cl0ck_ed
I entirely agree with ITGUY that the product is falsely advertised, as far as I know, the only liquid that is non conductive is the 3M stuff.

At the end of the day water and electrics don’t mix; it is at the users risk of component failure. I don’t think lives are at risk at all. Someone would have to be very unfortunate to suffer a fatal injury from a liquid leaking in his or her pc.

These companies selling these liquids are lying to their customers, and the customers have to be pretty naive to believe that the liquid is entirely non-conductive.

Imo reviewers of these liquids need to make it clear to their audience that the liquids are not non-conductive. The water coolant should be marketed as non-corrosive coloured coolant that may or may not boost performance over de-ionised water.

Ed

edit:

Good vid from petra tech shop:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-yT7cvfo3o&feature=channel_page

06-03-2009, 20:24:36

Pseudonym
What, products are being advertised in a way that makes them seem better than they really are? When did this start happening?

That's what advertisment is about. Non conductive means non conductive to a given current, not non conductive to all currents, amps, and voltage. It's like water proof watches. They are water proof to X depth/pressure.

06-03-2009, 20:28:24

cl0ck_ed
Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Pseudonym'
What, products are being advertised in a way that makes them seem better than they really are? When did this start happening?

That's what advertisment is about. Non conductive means non conductive to a given current, not non conductive to all currents, amps, and voltage. It's like water proof watches. They are water proof to X depth/pressure.
Exactly, that is where the confusion lies.

06-03-2009, 20:29:25

Daza
Theres me thinking that everyone knew that at 12v like its been said its very hard to kill stuff unless your just unlucky.

Ive had mobos, ram, gfx cards you name it ive had it soaked but not a 240v psu theres a slight difference between 12v and 240v like the small matter of living.

07-03-2009, 05:28:45

monkey7
I agree with daza. 12v doesn't even get through a very thin layer of plastic where a friend of me had 230v go through an insulated screwdriver.

I also agree that advertising as non conductive is plain wrong. As seen on the petras tech shop video, distilled water was even less conductive than the branded coolant, of which he did not mention the brand name sadly.

Any way you put it, I think you have been a bit too ... persistent making your point here ITGUY. I was anything but happy to see a post like yours trying to make your point against kempez. Yes he may be wrong on some points, but try bringing that in a reasonable way without larger fonts and capital letters. Yet I'm going to reply to it:

1) You say it's monumentally stupid to use this product in your PC. So is mixing computer components with water, and yet about 80% of the people on this forum do it without problems?

2) agreed. The bottle clearly said 'non conductive' on another youtube vid.

3) Yes the bottle is plastic, but would probably zap you right away when put to a clear 230v / 5A source. The miracle protecting you is the fact a pouring liquid consists of seperate drops which have holes between them that barely conduct. That's why p*ssing an electrified fence usually ends well.

07-03-2009, 08:58:48

Diablo
Just a further observation, how many people are running their PSU with no casing, directly below a very leaky barb? In addition, unless you happened to be using a non earthed PSU and be touching the PSU at the time, I think the worst that would happen is a load of sparks and a blown fuse at the plug.

07-03-2009, 14:40:21

FarFarAway
I would like to say from an OC3D perspective: we do not censor opinions of our readers/members, we do stop people breaking our T&C's and rules. No censorship has taken place on this thread and nor will it, unless rules are broken.

Marketing is marketing, people who are watercooling should know better than to trust anything they put near their PC's. The science of it is simple and irrefutable and once you expose any liquid to the world it's likely to become conductive in some way.

Either way, don't mess with liquid and PSU's unless you are mad or....well: Jim

07-03-2009, 14:56:29

monkey7
Nah, he just messes with psu's, heavy crossload and extremely high ambients

08-03-2009, 11:53:51

JN
At some level there probably is some truth to FluidXP's "non-conductive" claims. I'd imagine that if the fluid was not exposed to air (e.g straight from manufacture to air-free loop) then it may be totally non-conductive. Obviously that's going to be impossible, but I reckon thats how FluidXP manage to maintain their claims.

At the end of the day, if you're going to be cooling your PC with fluid then you should be aware of the risks and not stupid enough to assume that a magical bottle of fluid is going to save your life and your system if you spring a leak.

Its the commercialisation of water cooling that is the most dangerous thing of all, not the products used.

08-03-2009, 21:14:36

tinytomlogan
Bah........

Non conductive is non conductive look at the fans they put in coolant.

Add dust to the mix for you dirty boys and then THATS where the problem is.

Long and short of it is in a controled enviroment OR small leaks in a clean machine is fine.

If your not happy with this stuff youll be happy with nothing else on the market so go get that AC7 back out the box.

Ill sit here at 4.5ghz@32c with a pair of 4870s at 30c..... quieter + cooler.

You just have to look after it right.

Watercooling isnt a monster, its a woman, treat it right youl have hours of freaky fun, use and abuse, it will go perform better with your best mate instead

08-03-2009, 21:55:05

HypoglossalXII
If watercooling is a woman, I really really need to get laid cause I cant push my 9950 on air beyond 3ghz

-HypoG
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.