Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

Up Close: Cooler Overview

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

Up Close:  Cooler Overview

Although an all new design the Seidon treads a familiar path.  A slim rad measuring just 27mm in depth is coupled with a pump/cold plate assembly by means of 300mm corrugated tubing. 

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review     Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

If you're thinking the plastic corrugated tubing lacks the flexibility of some of the rubberised tubing seen on other coolers you'd be wrong.  It's ever bit as flexible and short of hitting it with a hammer guaranteed not to kink

 Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review      Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review

 

The Seidon comes with a Cooler Master fan (resplendent with a Cooler Master logo on one of it's blades).  The fan is a 600-2400 RPM model with manufacturers specifications rating it at between 19 and 40dBA.  Looks like at full tat we can expect this fan to produce a little less than a gentle susurration. 

Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review      Cooler Master Seidon 120M Review  

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Most Recent Comments

03-04-2013, 08:46:34

tinytomlogan
Let's put the 120M, smallest of Cooler Master's new Seidon series of AIO water coolers through its paces.


http://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/artic...140151561l.jpg


Continue Reading

03-04-2013, 09:51:58

Master&Puppet
Looks like a reasonable alternative to some of the mid-range tower coolers on cooler systems although it seems pretty noisy.

03-04-2013, 09:53:19

barnsley
I was hoping you'd review this! I've been looking at AIO coolers for my new build for sometime and I wondered about this. Definitely going on my parts to buy list

03-04-2013, 10:06:56

UkGouki
its a pretty good choice if you only wont a moderate overclock tbh im thinking of getting this as funds at the mo are tight and it will get me what i want out of my system

03-04-2013, 12:29:02

lwatcdr
I just do not get it. Why does everyone just use fan controllers and such when modern Motherboards have fan headers and heat sensors. Why can't people set a max CPU temp of say 60c and let the computer spin the fan up and down as the load changes? You could then alway have the lowest noise for a given temp. Seems like this should be an automated function.

03-04-2013, 14:20:06

alpenwasser
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwatcdr View Post
I just do not get it. Why does everyone just use fan controllers and such when modern Motherboards have fan headers and heat sensors. Why can't people set a max CPU temp of say 60c and let the computer spin the fan up and down as the load changes? You could then alway have the lowest noise for a given temp. Seems like this should be an automated function.
I can only speak for myself but I have yet to possess a motherboard that
  • has enough fan headers for my needs in the right locations and/or
  • provides enough power on its fan headers to power an array of fans,
  • provides enough power for a D5 pump (I know they can be hooked up to the PSU directly and the Vario can be adjusted without a fan controller, but it's much more comfortable not having to use the little nob on the pump's back, and yes, I do change my pump's speed from time to time, albeit not often) and
  • lets me define not only max temps but actual fan curves, because everything else is useless (to me, at least).

These are unlikely to change in the future. It's not really reasonable to build a M/B with 10 to 12 fan headers (which you can easily use with two radiators on push/pull or something comparable) or fan headers that can provide ~30 W of power for a pump (market is too small).

The fan curve thing should be feasible though, I'll admit. I don't want my fans spinning up to 100% when a certain max temp is hit, I want them to ramp up by maybe 20% to see if that's enough and then throttle down again.

If you look at a real fan controller like the Aquaero, that's a very complex tool. You don't just integrate something like that into a M/B. It is certainly feasible, but it would cost accordingly.

Overall I'd say cost is probably the reason why the M/B that fits my needs regarding fan control is unlikely to arrive any time soon, and as long as that I'll stick to fan controllers. Besides, I like fan controllers, they have knobs and buttons and displays and stuff

03-04-2013, 16:39:35

Mgutierrez33
In the post I made about the rig I built up for my girlfriend, I also did a small review of this cooler. Even on an AMD processor churning out 1.36V it kept the temps VERY respectably low after 30-45 min straight of Prime95. Glad that this got the review it did :-)

03-04-2013, 19:12:37

lwatcdr
There should be no need for you to set a curve. The motherboard would not use what is called a bang bang system but would create it's own curve to keep the temperatures below the max you set. Once at max the temps would rise until the you hit the throttle temps. As to the power draw you could have a controller that you plug the fan header into and a molex or SATA connector into. When there is so much computing power sitting there it is just a bit nuts that we are fiddling with knobs and such to change our fan speeds.

04-04-2013, 09:49:30

alpenwasser
Quote:
Originally Posted by lwatcdr View Post
There should be no need for you to set a curve. The motherboard would not use what is called a bang bang system but would create it's own curve to keep the temperatures below the max you set. Once at max the temps would rise until the you hit the throttle temps.
Not an unreasonable approach, but I actually might want to set my own curves. Although I suppose this could be solved by providing different preset profiles from which you could select the one you desire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lwatcdr View Post
As to the power draw you could have a controller that you plug the fan header into and a molex or SATA connector into.
If I understand correctly you mean some sort of separate power circuitry on the M/B that provides enough fan headers and possibly has additional power input? Cost is probably why this has not been done so far.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lwatcdr View Post
When there is so much computing power sitting there it is just a bit nuts that we are fiddling with knobs and such to change our fan speeds.
My machine runs at 100% pretty much 24/7, so I don't really need to fiddle with my fan controller very often (maybe if it gets very hot in summer I turn it up a bit and in winter down again).

To me, the value of a fan controller lies more in being able to monitor what my cooling system is doing (this includes flow meters, pump speeds etc.). The trouble with having that stuff controlled by the M/B is that the only way to get at that data while the computer is running would most likely be through some sort of monitoring software provided by the M/B manufacturer.

Most likely, this software would only run on Windows, and since I do not run Windows I would not have access to my cooling system's parameters anymore. Therefore, separating my cooling system from the rest of my hardware is actually quite valuable to me since I would not get proper support on my O/S anyway.

If interfaces for this were to be standardized and a proper API provided (such as with S.M.A.R.T. and temp sensors and such, which I can easily read out in Linux/FreeBSD et.al.), I could possibly get behind this, but I think that's not very likely since M/B manufacturers would probably like to distinguish themselves from their competitors and would devise their own, proprietary solutions.

12-04-2013, 14:18:06

DragonX444
What if you put on a 2nd fan... Lets say 2 Noiseblocker Multiframe M12-P (2000 rpm) or PS (1500 rpm) in a push pull combo... i wonder what the results would be!

12-04-2013, 15:49:10

Mgutierrez33
With the radiator being a low profile ordeal I don't know that you would see much of a performance increase really. I could be wrong on that one tho.

12-04-2013, 16:13:24

DragonX444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mgutierrez33 View Post
With the radiator being a low profile ordeal I don't know that you would see much of a performance increase really. I could be wrong on that one tho.
I've seen another site do the same review with 2 low rpm noctua fans 1500rpm. The only difference was in noise which was a LOT lower as they stated. The cooling performance was the same. Also on the physics side of things ... its true that the thickness plays a important part, BUT... if you got power to move more air the rad is going to get cooler (up to a point).
Also i have seen in some reviews they say there comes a distinct ticking sound from the pump. How loud is it really? I dont wanna buy the thing and then wake up in the night like when your bathroom foset leeks

12-04-2013, 16:41:18

Mgutierrez33
Quote:
Originally Posted by DragonX444 View Post
Also i have seen in some reviews they say there comes a distinct ticking sound from the pump. How loud is it really? I dont wanna buy the thing and then wake up in the night like when your bathroom foset leeks
Being an owner of one of these, you have to have your head directly next tot he case to hear it, at which point yes it is very noticeable... but who puts their head directly next to their chassis on a regular basis?

13-04-2013, 01:59:38

DragonX444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mgutierrez33 View Post
Being an owner of one of these, you have to have your head directly next tot he case to hear it, at which point yes it is very noticeable... but who puts their head directly next to their chassis on a regular basis?
Thx man... well im gonna get it and put 2 fans on it and see what happens... ill update you all when i got it set up!

26-04-2013, 20:49:21

Greenback
Tom will you be reviewing the Cooler Master Eisberg by any chance

05-05-2013, 19:25:07

GreenBarb
I have bought one of these and it's great. I have an intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 overclocked to 2.9ghz. With a Zalman low profile 3 pipe heatsink on BF3 I was hitting 65c, with the Cooler Master Sedion 120 I get 48c. That is a big drop in temp and it's in a NZXT Vulcan.

10-06-2013, 07:55:48

AJN
are they using Peltier chips for cooling??
Reply
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