Cooler Master Eisberg 240L Prestige Review

Conclusion

Cooler Master Eisberg 240L Prestige Review

 

Conclusion

This isn't going to be the usual long conclusion. You see, the Eisberg 240L Prestige suffers from the same fundamental flaw as the 120L.  The pump noise is hugely intrusive and wholly unacceptable.  Yes it's a little less disturbing with the speed reducer in place but really all this seems to do is alter the pitch as opposed to the volume of the buzz that emanates from the unit, and don't forget the 2-3 degree hit in temps you'll have to trade for a slightly less annoying noise.  There are positives here, let's not forget that, the build quality finish and usual Cooler Master attention to detail are there, right down to the gloss black tubing counterpointing the satin finish of the hardware and the colour matched compression fittings.  The performance although acceptable is not stellar, especially when compared to other much cheaper units.  But even with all that considered we really couldn't live with the noise. 

It's rare to write a negative conclusion as pretty much everything we test and review has good points and bad points.  For the most part these can be subjectively weighed leading to an overall impression.  However when looking at the Eisberg 240L Prestige it's hard to find anything positive enough to outweigh the negatives.  Cooler Master have known for a good long while now that there are issues with the pump noise, in fact even at pre release it was brought to their attention with vows following that it would be sorted for the production models.  We ourselves raised the matter when the 120L was tested, but still the issue remains.  Cooler Master have a pretty much pristine record, but the Eisberg series is a definite blot on their copy book.  Thing is, even if the pump was quiet as a paedo in a play ground we'd still find it hard to recommend it.  £130 is a lot to pay and that sort of money buys you a decent genuine AIO with money left over, or for that matter, if you want to go down the custom route gets you damn close to two of the 240mm kits we reviewed last month.

As you'd expect the Eisberg scores low, very low.  Come On Cooler Master, Perfect it or Pull it. 

Thanks to Cooler Master for the 240L, you can discuss your thoughts in the OC3D Forums. 

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Most Recent Comments

30-09-2013, 05:49:35

tinytomlogan
http://www.overclock3d.net/gfx/artic...073825886l.jpg

Having reviewed the 120L back in June it's now time to take a look at the big brother, the 240L Prestige.

Continue Reading

30-09-2013, 07:03:20

barnsley
I'd expect a noisy pump with the cheaper seidon series, not with their upmarket eisberg coolers, good job coolermaster :/.

-edit-
If my seidon 120m is anything to go by, the seidon 240m would be a much better buy than this.

30-09-2013, 07:49:43

Excalabur50
Wow so glad I'm running a H100i after reading that

30-09-2013, 17:03:52

R0Y
I highly doubt if anybody who can afford a high-end system with a 3960X will be opting for a AIO at all, if extreme OC is the intention.

I think a mainstream 4670K or 4770K system might be a more reasonable test system for a AIO like this.

Also, some of the graphs aren't right. eg: H100i max and balanced @4GHz/1.25v

01-10-2013, 06:47:44

G-Dubs
Quote:
Originally Posted by R0Y View Post
I highly doubt if anybody who can afford a high-end system with a 3960X will be opting for a AIO at all, if extreme OC is the intention.

I think a mainstream 4670K or 4770K system might be a more reasonable test system for a AIO like this.

Also, some of the graphs aren't right. eg: H100i max and balanced @4GHz/1.25v
We run the tests on the 3960X because it's a "hot" chip, the idea being that if a cooler can cope with its thermal characteristics when Overclocked then it is most definitely going to be able to cope with other CPUs.

Secondly, to compare the performance of one cooler against another it's essential that all the tests are run under the same conditions and with the same hardware. Imagine if we ran GPU tests using different hardware and different test set ups and benchmarks etc. there'd be no continuity and as such no comparisons could be made which would render the whole thing pointless.

Having explained the reasons for two of your points, i'm going to let you go away and work out for yourself why the H100i results are as they are.

01-10-2013, 13:52:13

R0Y
Quote:
Originally Posted by G-Dubs View Post
We run the tests on the 3960X because it's a "hot" chip, the idea being that if a cooler can cope with its thermal characteristics when Overclocked then it is most definitely going to be able to cope with other CPUs.

Secondly, to compare the performance of one cooler against another it's essential that all the tests are run under the same conditions and with the same hardware. Imagine if we ran GPU tests using different hardware and different test set ups and benchmarks etc. there'd be no continuity and as such no comparisons could be made which would render the whole thing pointless.

Having explained the reasons for two of your points, i'm going to let you go away and work out for yourself why the H100i results are as they are.
Thanks for the reply. I understand the need for consistency. I was only suggesting that it would be nicer to see the hot-enough Haswell 4670K/4770K chips being used for the tests, since that would allow the majority of users (the ones who are actually likely to buy the cooler for their chips) to know the ACTUAL temps they can expect at their locations.

I still don't understand how "balanced" can be cooler than "max".

01-10-2013, 16:13:26

tinytomlogan
Short of testing everything on multiple sockets its not going to happen with 1150. We have used 2011 since it first come out and thats why there is so much info in the graphs.

Saying "use 1150 so people know" is also a bit off because there are too many variables

01-10-2013, 16:35:10

R0Y
Aah well. Thanks anyway.
Reply
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