Silverstone SG08 Review Page: 1

 Silverstone SG08  

 

Introduction.

The Silverstone SG08 is the latest in the line of SUGO cases.  Measuring only 222 mm (w) x 190 mm (h) x 351 mm (d) and styled not just as a desktop PC but to be comfortable in the home cinema environment the 10mm thick extruded Aluminium front panel means the SG08 won't look out of place sat next to a high end home cinema amplifier or tucked in beside a simple set top box.   The SG08 is able to accommodate DTX and Mini ITX boards as well as having 2 expansion slots and room for GPUs up to 12.2" in length as well as CPU coolers up to 117mm in height.  All that and a Bronze certified 600W PSU.

 

Technical Specification.

 

Model No.

SST-SG08B(black)

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--

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Material

10mm aluminum front panel, SECC body

Motherboard

DTX, Mini-ITX

Multimedia

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Drive Bay

External

Slim optical x 1

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Internal

3.5” x 1 , 2.5”x 2

Cooling System

Front

--

Rear

--

Side

VGA fan duct with oversized vents

Top

180mm Air Penetrator 700/1200rpm, 18/34dBA

Bottom

PSU intake vents and VGA exhaust divider

Internal

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Expansion Slot

2

Front I/O Port

USB3.0 x 2
Audio x 1
MIC x 1

Power Supply

Custom 600W with 80 PLUS Bronze certification and single +12V rail

Operating system support

--

Expansion Card

Support expansion cards up to 12.2 inches

Limitation of CPU cooler

117mm

Limitation of PSU

12.2"

Net Weight

6 kg

Dimension

222 mm (w) x 190 mm (h) x 351 mm (d)

Extra

--

 

AMD Radeon HD 5970 – 12.2 "
AMD Radeon HD 6970 – 11”
AMD Radeon HD 6950 – 11”
AMD Radeon HD 5870 – 11”
AMD Radeon HD 6870 – 10.5”
NVidia Geforce GTX580 – 10.5”
NVidia Geforce GTX480 – 10.5”
AMD Radeon HD 5850 – 9.5”
NVidia Geforce GTX470 – 9.5”
AMD Radeon HD 6850 – 9”

Model No.

SST-ST60F-SG

Max. DC Output

600W

Load Range

 

+3.3V

+5V

+12V1

+12V2

+12V3

+12V4

+5VSB

-12V

-5V

Max.(Amps)

25A

25A

46A

/

/

/

3.0A

0.8A

/

Min.(Amps)

0.8A

0.5A

4A

/

/

/

0.1A

0A

/

Range (%)

±5%

±5%

±5%

/

/

/

±5%

±10%

/

Ripple(mVp-p)

50mV

50mV

120mV

/

/

/

50mV

120mV

/

combined +3.3, +5V

140W

combined +12V

46A / 552W

Input Voltage

90V ~ 265V(Auto Range)

Input Frequency Range

47Hz ~ 63Hz

PFC

Active PFC (PF>0.95 at full load)

Efficiency

82%~85% at 20%~100% loading

MTBF

100,000 hours at 25°C, full load

Operating temperature

10°C ~ 50°C

Protection

Over Current Protection
Over power Protection
Over Voltage Protection
Under Voltage Protection
Short Circuit Protection

Connectors

1 x 24 / 20-Pin Motherboard connector (670mm)
1 x 8 / 4-Pin EPS / ATX 12V connector (670mm)
1 x 8/6-Pin PCIE connector (360mm)
1 x 8/6-Pin PCIE connector (380mm)
3 x SATA connector (350mm + 130mm + 150mm)
2 x 4-Pin Peripheral connector (350mm + 100mm)

Color

Black (Lead-Free Paint)

Cooling System

Single 120mm fan

Noise Level

17 dBA - 30dBA

Dimension

150 mm (W) x 86 mm (H) x 140 mm (D)

Weight

940g

Form factor

ATX12V / EPS12V

Certification

80 PLUS Bronze

Other

GPU Support list

 



Silverstone SG08 Review Page: 2

Silverstone SG08

 

Up Close:  Exterior

The first thing that strikes you about the SG08 when you unpack it is the weight of it.  It's heavy!  It'd still be heavy it was a standard sized ATX never mind one of the smallest cases on the market.  The reason for the weight is twofold.  Firstly, the case comes with an integral PSU, and secondly, the battleship like build quality.

Externally the case is very simple.  I feel to describe it as plain would be an injustice, as it would imply that there was no style in the simplicity.  The front of the case is made from 10mm thick (yes 10mm) extruded Aluminium and finished in Silverstones trademark brushing before being anodised black.  A slot load for a slimline optical drive resides towards the very top of the front panel, with the power button tucked quite inconspicuously into the bottom left hand corner.  2xUSB3, a phono and mic jack-plug sockets are arranged vertically down the right hand side.  For those of you who have read my review of the TJ04-E this method of accommodating the front I/O is what I was suggesting would have looked better than the sloping roof ramp Silverstone chose to go with on the TJ04-E.

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08  

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08  

 

Both sides of the case have large vented areas cut into them.  With the case being a positive pressure design, all of these vent are to allow warm air to be pushed out.  The Vented area on the roof protects the only case fan to be found in the SG08 with the fan underneath being one of Silverstones own air perpetrator units. 

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08  

 

Moving to the rear of the case we see that Silverstone have located quite a few of the controls back here, presumably so as not to clutter up the front fascia.  In the top left of the rear we find a small switch which enables you to choose between a case fan at 700rpm and 18dB-A or 1200rpm and 34dB-A.  The right side of he rear of the case is home to the 2 vented expansion slot covers (strangely in chrome not black like the rest of the case), and the 3 pin IEC mains lead connection socket.  Just to the left of this is a small and inconspicuous reset button.

The base of the case has a 120mm filtered fan guard protecting the air intake for the PSU, with a further area of venting over to the right hand side to aid GPU cooling.  It's worth noting that all intakes on the SG08 have filters. 

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08   



Silverstone SG08 Review Page: 3

Silverstone SG08

 

Up Close:  Interior

The interior of the case is accessed by means of removing 3 screws from the rear of the case and then sliding and lifting of the whole of the side and roof section as one piece.  This gives good all round access to the inside of the case.  It's necessary to remove this section in order to remove and clean the top fan intake filter (shown below right) 

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08  

 

It's pretty hard to photograph the inside of the case as it's already pretty full before you even start the build.  In simple terms the front half is taken up by the PSU and drive bays, with the rear area being for the Motherboard.  Storage wise the SG08 can accommodate a single 3.5" HDD or 2 x 2.5" drives.  There is no 5.25" bay as such so if you want to fit an optical drive your going to need to splash out on a slimline model.  The image in the bottom right shows the case fully stripped of all that is removable.  The fan and the filter down the right hand side are easy enough to spot. Immediately in front of the filter is the USB3 -USB2 adaptor, a few cable ties and then to the left lies an adjustable fan duct with filter.  this is intended to channel air towards the intake of your chosen GPU.  Above this fan duct we see on the left the 3.5" drive bay and the mounting plate for the slimline optical drive.

 Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08   

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08   



Silverstone SG08 Review Page: 4

Silverstone SG08

 

The Build

I was actually quite hesitant when it came time to build into the SG08.  Having seen the amount of space the PSU cables and the PSU itself were taking up I wasn't entirely convinced there would be enough room inside for for my hands let alone the hardware.  But as you'll soon see I needn't have worried.

Having access on three sides means that the case is very easy to work on.  You do need to have a bit of a think about what order you do things in, but it's no biggy if you get a bit out of sync.  First thing to do is mount your HDD into the 3.5" bay.  No tool-less mounting, just nice simple screws and rubber isolation grommets.  The bay is then slid into the area above the PSU and is again located by screws with rubber isolation grommets.  Next in is the motherboard, again many thanks to Zotacfor the loan of the rather tasty M880G-ITX Wifi.  The integrated custom PSU has a single 12V rail and has all the basic essential connections for a case of this size without overdoing it and leaving you with far more cables than you need.  The picture below right should give you a good idea of what's on offer however for full details of connectivity and PSU features please see the Technical Specifications page. 

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08  

 

HDD and motherboard in we start to connect up the power to the Mobo.  The PSU has a split 20+4 pin main ATX and a split 2x4 pin ATX for the PSU area.  As I'm not putting a separate GPU in I won't need to use either of the 2 6+2pin PCI cables.  Next comes the power reset switches, always a fiddle but thanks to the access actually less so than in a conventional case.  Followed by the Audio and USB via the adapter.  Please note that in the image below left, the case isn't bent, I'm just using the very wide angle of my lens which does tent to cause a small distortion sometimes. 

Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08  

 

Everything in place and hooked up were good to go.  I'm actually quite pleased with the cable management job I've done in such a small area.  Conveniently there is a bit of a space towards one side of the PSU for unused cables to be coiled up and stored.  There's even the odd cable tie mount in the base of the case.   However if you were to use a dedicated GPU then you'd have to find somewhere else to stash the cables as the would protrude into this area.  Talking of GPUs, although some users of this case are simply going to be opting for Mini ITX Mobos and processors with built in GPUs, it's worth bearing in mind that this case is capable of providing you with so much more.  The observant amongst you will have noticed the twin expansion slots at the back and be wondering just how big a GPU you can fit in this little chap.  Well wonder no more, as I can tell you it will accept a twin slot GPU up to 12.2 inches in length.  In real money that means that a twin slot 7970 or 580 will fit fine.  In fact all the way up to the 5970 which comes in at exactly 12.2".    

 Silverstone SG08     Silverstone SG08   



Silverstone SG08 Review Page: 5

 Silverstone SG08 


Conclusion


Having recently reviewed the new TJ04-E I'm a little concerned I might be starting to sound a bit like a stuck record when describing the quality of Silverstone cases.  Let me put it this way.  Normally there's something you can pick out as "letting the side down".  One little fault that is in excusable and simply has to be addressed.  But with the SG08 there's nothing, I mean nothing.  Quality wise I can't fault it.  It's all there.  Quality of materials, quality of finish, quality of fit, attention to detail.  Even the instruction booklet feels like it's cover is made from stiffened linen.

Before I was a PC guy, I was a Hifi Guy.  In the Hifi world there is a descriptive quality referred to as "Rack Presence".  Essentially the ability of a piece of kit to stand out in a non garish way amongst your other HiFi components.  The Music Fidelity X-Ray series is a pretty good example of this phenomenon.  Small though it may be, it cannot be denied that the SG08 has "Rack Presence".  Conversely, If correctly positioned in the Lounge/Home Cinema environment  It's diminutive looks enable it to blend perfectly into the back ground should you so desire.

In use the SG08 is one of the few cases I would refer to as "silent".  Obviously there's no such thing but on the low fan setting you really do have to get your ear right up against it to work out if it's on or not.

The build was a joy and didn't present nearly as many problems as I was anticipating.  OK, I had to refer to the instructions a few times to see exactly how things came apart and went back together, but I'llput this down to me not being quite as smart and not possessing the same ingenuity as the egg heads at Silverstone.

I'm sitting here trying really hard to find fault with this case and I just can't.  If I could this conclusion would be much longer as it would weigh up the short comings and the ways in which the case could have been "so much better".  Even when I consider the price of £178 I'm left thinking "Yeah, but so what it's worth every penny".  If you're looking at the SG08 you're looking at it because the shape and style is what you need and what you want.  If you're looking to build a small but powerful gaming rig which is perfectly at home in the lounge you could do much worse than to mate your Z68 Mini ITX mobo with your GPU of choice and have yourself one pretty powerful pocket battleship.  My advice is, if you've thought about getting the SG08, don't mess about, go and get one, you will be very pleased with your decision.

Because I can't fault it, I have to give the SG08 a well deserved Gold.

 

         

Thanks to Silverstone for sending the SG08 in for review, you can discuss your thoughts in the OC3D forums.