VIA Unveils VIA OpenBook Mini-Note Reference Design

"VIA today introduced the new VIA OpenBook mini-note reference design targeted at the rapidly growing global market for ultra-portable notebooks. "

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VIA Unveils VIA OpenBook Mini-Note Reference Design
 

 VIA today introduced the new VIA OpenBook™ mini-note reference design targeted at the rapidly growing global market for ultra-portable notebooks.

The VIA OpenBook mini-note reference design introduces a host of new innovations, including the next generation of VIA Ultra Mobile Platform, based on the VIA C7®-M ULV processor and the new all-in-one VIA VX800 digital media IGP chipset. Together, this ultra compact, power efficient platform delivers richer computing and multimedia features, including a stunning 8.9" screen and greater video playback support, in a compact and stylish clamshell form factor that weighs just 1kg.

The VIA OpenBook features a flexible internal interface for high-speed broadband wireless connectivity that provides customers with the ability to select from a choice of WiMAX™, HSDPA and EV-DO/W-CDMA modules appropriate to their market. In addition, under a unique collaborative approach, the CAD files of the external panels of the reference design are offered for download under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 license to give customers such as OEMs, system integrators, and broadband service providers greater freedom in tailoring the look and feel of their device to meet the diverse needs of their target markets.

The VIA OpenBook builds on the great success of the VIA NanoBook reference design launched last year, which has been widely adopted by numerous customers around the world," commented Richard Brown, Vice President of Corporate Marketing, VIA Technologies, Inc. "Our unique open approach to case design customization and wireless connectivity flexibility, coupled with the higher levels of performance, further extends VIA's leadership in the global mini-note market.

VIA is a forward thinking company that has realized that sharing enables a healthy ecosystem which helps them provide an innovative product which supports their core business," commented Jon Phillips, Business and Community Manager for Creative Commons. "Making the actual raw CAD files available under a Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike 3.0 license is a brilliant first step that clearly and legally allows others to emergently build upon VIA's open innovation.


Powered by the VIA C7-M ULV processor and the VIA VX800 digital media IGP chipset, the VIA OpenBook mini-note reference design is a small, 1kg, 8.9" mini-notebook form factor design that supports screen resolutions of up to 1024x600 and high performance VIA Chrome9™ DirectX™ 9.0 3D graphics. Advanced video acceleration for MPEG-2, MPEG-4, WMV9, VC1 and DiVX video formats, a VMR capable HD video processor and 8-channel HD audio make it a highly media rich mini-notebook platform.


The VIA OpenBook mini-note reference design offers unrivaled broadband connectivity options though two internal modules, with the first one featuring WiFi, Bluetooth, and optional AGPS connections and the second one offering a choice of WiMAX, HSDPA, or EV-DO/W-CDMA options. In addition, the VIA OpenBook also comes with three USB 2.0 ports, a VGA port, and audio-in/audio-out jacks as well as a 4-in-1 card reader (SD/SDIO/MMC/MS) and a 2 mega-pixel dual-headed web camera.

The VIA OpenBook supports a wide range of operating system environments, including Microsoft Windows Vista Basic, Microsoft Windows XP, and various Linux distributions. The device features up to 2GB DDR2 DRAM and can be equipped with a choice of hard disk drive and solid state storage options.

Featuring a 4-cell 2600mA lithium-ion battery, the VIA OpenBook delivers up to three hours of battery life and measures just 240mm(W)x175mm (D) x36.2mm (H).

For more information, file downloads, video and images of the VIA OpenBook mini-note reference design please visit the VIA OpenBook website here: www.viaopenbook.com
 

 
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Most Recent Comments

31-05-2008, 16:39:34

agentx
ok well a tight budget is no problem how bout you give me the price your working with and i'll put a list of parts together for you and you can see if you like it. also rads are very important and it might be best if you consisder dual core ones opposed to standard single core.

31-05-2008, 16:47:52

Stitch10925
Well, I can't give you a precise range, but I'm guessing that would be somewhere around 300 dollars (about 200 Euro)...after some saving :-P

So, I am assuming you are not too much of a fan of that Petra kit eh? Since you are offering to put together parts for me :p

Just to help you a bit:

- Need cooling for CPU and GPU block (Core 2 Duo E6700 and GeForce 6700 GT Respectively)
- Blocks in parallel configuration would be nice
- I have a mid-sized case, so parts (like pump) can't be to big
- I prefer not to have a reservoir when possible, fillport would be nice, and when a reservoir is needed, either a fillport reservoir or a bay tank
- I want it to be silent! (duh! :p my fans are really starting to bug me)
- Pump I would like to have on a molex connector or fan header

Guess that's about it :-)

Anyways, many thanks for what you have done and given me for information already :D

ok well a tight budget is no problem how bout you give me the price your working with and i'll put a list of parts together for you and you can see if you like it. also rads are very important and it might be best if you consisder dual core ones opposed to standard single core.

31-05-2008, 16:54:28

agentx
alright well i'll get on it and find you some good stuff. and its just nice to share my thoughts about pcs and the like =)

31-05-2008, 19:06:09

agentx
ok heres a quick list of components i threw together (some im using in my next build). it totals out around $240 american, just add fans, splitters, and tubing and your good to go.

rad: black ice pro 2 35.99 @ performance-pcs.com
cpu: FuZion v.2 64.99 @ petras.com
gpu: DD maze 5 44.95 @ performance-pcs.com
nb: koolance chc-125 49.99 @performance-pcs.com
pump: thermaltake p500 49.95 @ performance-pcs.com

04-06-2008, 17:50:46

Stitch10925
Thanks, that looks like a very good list!

I was wondering what took you so long, so today I decided to take a look...and lo an behold...a post 3 days old... apparently missed the notification mail somehow. So, sorry for the delayed reply.

I noticed you added a North-Bridge block to the list. Is this really required? I have a passive cooling fan for this. Also I have a 120mm fan in the side of the case which I will run at low speeds just for airflow to cool the capacitors around the CPU socket and general passive cooling of the mobo

Also, any other gpu block I could use? (The one you listed is out of stock)... what about the MC-TDX From Danger Den, it's designed for multi-core processors

Greets,

Stitch10925

-------

ok heres a quick list of components i threw together (some im using in my next build). it totals out around $240 american, just add fans, splitters, and tubing and your good to go.

rad: black ice pro 2 35.99 @ performance-pcs.com
cpu: FuZion v.2 64.99 @ petras.com
gpu: DD maze 5 44.95 @ performance-pcs.com
nb: koolance chc-125 49.99 @performance-pcs.com
pump: thermaltake p500 49.95 @ performance-pcs.com

06-06-2008, 03:16:18

agentx
well its probly best if you wc ur nb but u dont have to i shud mentions that if ur north and south bridges are linked via heatpipe u cant wc the north without having some cooling for the south. no prob about the wait man. and i wouldnt use a cpu block for a gpu for mounting reasons and design reasons. i'd lok for it somewere else or pick a different one u know.

06-06-2008, 04:44:07

Stitch10925
Oh, sorry, I mistyped. I meant to ask if I could use another CPU block than the one you gave me, not GPU block. Sorry about that.

So, recap: Is the MC-TDX a good CPU block to use instead of the FuZion?

My North- and Southbridge are not connected to another, however, my Northbridge does have heatpipes, so that is why I was wondering if the Northbrige block was really needed.

-----

well its probly best if you wc ur nb but u dont have to i shud mentions that if ur north and south bridges are linked via heatpipe u cant wc the north without having some cooling for the south. no prob about the wait man. and i wouldnt use a cpu block for a gpu for mounting reasons and design reasons. i'd lok for it somewere else or pick a different one u know.

06-06-2008, 05:15:12

agentx
to be honest idk how that block performs as the fuzion is the only block i've used so far as for the northbridge im pretty sure that if u replaced the heat pipe performance would go up as the northbridge is pumping heat to the mosfet cooler. mosfet heatsinks are relatively cheat and mostly better than stok coolers.

http://www.jab-tech.com/D-tek-FuZion-CPU-Water-Block-pr-3667.html heres a link for a site that sells fuzion blocks

06-06-2008, 06:02:13

Stitch10925
Ok, thanx for the info. I'm guessing that the tubing will be 1/2" ID tubing correct? Also, I noticed that the pump you suggested is for 1/4" or 3/8" tubing...won't this decrease the flow because this seems to be a bottleneck

Thermal paste I was thinking Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound (trying to avoid the adhesives)...I'm guessing that will be ok. And for cooling liquid Swiftech HydrX Extreme.

I think that's about it then huh. It's all I need...if the pump turns out to be ok :-P

-------

to be honest idk how that block performs as the fuzion is the only block i've used so far as for the northbridge im pretty sure that if u replaced the heat pipe performance would go up as the northbridge is pumping heat to the mosfet cooler. mosfet heatsinks are relatively cheat and mostly better than stok coolers.

http://www.jab-tech.com/D-tek-FuZion-CPU-Water-Block-pr-3667.html heres a link for a site that sells fuzion blocks

06-06-2008, 08:17:30

agentx
3/8" id tubing shud be fine just use it for everything. 1/2" is only if u need to move large amouts of heat fast and isnt always the best way to go.

arctic silver 5 is good i use it as do most ppl just know that it takes a curing time of 200 hours so unless u plan on taking the blocks off often i wouldnt worry.

lastly take ur time adding the northbridge and mosfet coolers and not to breaak any of the parts or crack the mobo. good luck and cant wait to see some pics
Reply
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