24TB HDDs – New Technology Might Make it Possible

"The geeks at Hitachi have developed a revolutionary new hard disk drive technology that could change the capacity of HDDs for ever."

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The geeks at Hitachi have developed a revolutionary new hard disk drive technology that could change the capacity of HDDs for ever; the new technology has been developed jointly with NEDO, Japan’s public management organization.

The New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization – NEDO in short, is Japan’s nodal agency promoting research and development on energy and environmental technologies. The new development has come about as a result of the joint efforts of NEDO, the National University Corporation Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kyoto University and Hitachi.

The new technology allows as much as 3.9Tbit of data storage per square inch, which is far greater than anything currently available. The standard HDD today uses magnetic material as storage media. While recording, bits – collection of magnetized particles are laid out end-to-end on the disk platters. Greater the capacity of the platter to accommodate magnetized particles, greater will be the HDD’s storage capacity. Alternatively, smaller the size of the magnetic grains that make up the data bits, higher will be the storage capacity of the disk.

If somehow the magnetic grains can be arranged more efficiently, data storage capacity could be boosted. The research team in Japan has come up with a new patterning technology that allows ultra-high density arrangement of grains. This technology is based on a phenomenon through which polymer materials self-arrange the particles, allowing the formation of accurate magnetic structures as small as 10nm.

Current hard disks have an areal density of around 500Gbits per square inch. If the new technology is applied to such HDDs, the same disks can easily store 8-times the data they are capable of at the moment. Effectively speaking, this would result in HDDs with capacities of 24TB in the near future.

The researchers are still working on refining the technology and expect to present it in a proper form at the 2010 Material Research Society Fall meeting to be held in Boston, Massachusetts between November 29 and December 3.

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Most Recent Comments

16-11-2010, 22:40:33

Dewinte
Alrighty my first post adding something back, many reading this will know about these already but hey ho might help somebody out.

1) Graphical disk space representation with Space Monger. Download - SpaceMonger 1.4



This program shows your hard drive usage as proportional squares which is great for getting a feel for your drive usage and for those "MY IPHONE BACK UP IS HOW BIG???" moments so you can clean some extraneous stuff up. It's an old version but it's free and works for Win 7 and Vista that I've used.

2) Power searching your hard drives with Agent Ransack. Download - Agent Ransack 2010



Agent Ransack is great as it power searches very quickly using multiple threads and searches deeply, it's also intelligent and has more options as far as searching goes and the parameters you use. For those of you who may have disabled indexing like myself it's also incredibly useful. Feature comparison of the free version to the paid version.

3) Defragging your PageFile with PageDefrag (Win XP) - PageDefrag



For those still on XP who want have a fragmented pagefile and want it to get defragged quickly on a reboot without resetting the pagefile then use this. Otherwise if you're on Vista or 7 best bet is to redo your pagefile and set the min and max values the same as the system recommended value so that it doesn't fluctuate in size, and then move it to the faster beginning of your disk and there are many ways to do that.

These are pretty old and can be inconsequential to most but it can be a real help to the few who want them.

17-11-2010, 05:36:45

AlienALX
Jgoodies Jtools is wicked for seeing your disk space/usage. It uses pie charts.

17-11-2010, 20:30:52

Dewinte
Jgoodies

It looks quite nice :P although seems marginally less intuitive in it's presentation, nice that there are other options out there :)

18-11-2010, 10:09:10

AlienALX
It's simple clean and easy. Which is great if you just need to find some bloat and get it shifted :D

Has a nice feature where you click on the pie with the large chunks of data and then get it to send you to the offending places.

I didn't realise that when you use DVD shrink to rip a DVD to TS it stuffs the entire bloody image in a temp folder that doesn't auto clean. I had about 50gb of films I'd ripped a year earlier lol.

18-11-2010, 17:38:51

Dewinte


It's simple clean and easy. Which is great if you just need to find some bloat and get it shifted :D

Has a nice feature where you click on the pie with the large chunks of data and then get it to send you to the offending places.

I didn't realise that when you use DVD shrink to rip a DVD to TS it stuffs the entire bloody image in a temp folder that doesn't auto clean. I had about 50gb of films I'd ripped a year earlier lol.




Christ 50GB err I hope an update makes it auto-clean, yesus christos lol. Yep sounds fairly similar to SpaceMonger :P I'd get annoyed without a program like these two, as you show an example of things like that just take up needless space and get lost! I'll remember that about DVD Shrink.
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