Microsoft issue MP3 hotfix for Windows 7 Beta

"Resolution to potential problems with MP3 files is available."

Search News

  • Scrolling Image
Windows 7 Beta MP3 Hotfix now available
Windows 7 Beta MP3 hotfix available
Windows 7 Beta is proving to be a success in the amount of interest it has garnered so far. As it is a Beta, there are known issues with the operating system, and one of these to be identified by Microsoft is a bug related to Windows Media Centre and possible MP3 corruption. The media player is automatically set to add missing metadata to MP3 files, which could result in corruption of these files. It could also result in losing the first few seconds of the audio.
 
The problem was noted in the release notes of the Beta, but Microsoft have now issued a hotfix to rectify this problem. There are two versions available, for both 32bit and the 64bit versions of Windows 7 Beta. The hotfix can be downloaded as a standalone installer, or through Windows Update.

For more information, you can visit the Microsoft Knowledge Base article, where you will also find the relevant download links.

You can discuss this article in our forums here.
«Prev 1 Next»

Most Recent Comments

20-01-2009, 22:01:12

Dav0s
sorry for the late reply, manic revision at the moment!

im now in the second year of a maths degree. its a lot harder to do, and a lot harder to get on to, but in general any academic degree is.

as mentioned, i think for a career in IT you have to get on the ladder and work up. a degree might possibly allow you to start slightly further up the ladder if you do manage to get a job, but from what i hear it is just as hard to find one after a degree than before one. you run the risk of being in the same position with or without a degree, except in one scenario you have a large debt to deal with aswell.

overall it is the same as in any career, if you get on the ladder (often the hardest step) and prove yourself then you will excel, and it is no use taking the mentality that a degree will automatically earn you mega bucks, because ultimately it is your attitude and ability that will decide your successfulness.

13-02-2009, 19:59:31

freedom_12

but its lot of math


Yeah, I looked at the entrance requirements on a lot of courses and they all want maths, because its (apparently) a very mathematical course. So goodbye Computer Science..

14-02-2009, 05:27:53

Rastalovich
Can some1 who's doing computer science atm give us a breakdown of the cores today ?

From what I can remember from almost 20 years ago, they were:

Machine Language (68k)
Programming (Pascal/Cobol)
Accounting
Communications (verbal/written, not networking or anything)
(think there were 2 other things)

/begin waffle

Either way, I dropped it fairly early cos tbh although 68k was a tremendous language, even then u kinda knew it would have a limited lifespan (therefore practically useless after u finished the whole thing). Similarly Pascal/Cobol, cos unless u are a programmer by design (i.e. u just need a book on the language people want u to write in and ur good to go) C was the upcoming language of the moment.

Accounting I never figured the relevance, other than to prove to the others they couldn't do math. Communications on the other hand is essential in the workplace for teamwork especially and self improvement, but the communications of networks principles would be equally as important imo.

If the course was doing C, network principles, and 8086, I would probably have stuck with it.

Still can't remember the other 2 cores. Think perhaps something math based, which was stupid cos u really should be A-Level math standard to do the degree, and typically u spend the 1st degree year doing sub-A-level work.

Personally I feel a "computer science" degree should be all about building a knowledge of what the whole of the pc does. From understanding the ml to the easy programming languages - that are current and due to be for a long while. Today that arguably should include many of the web orientated languages.

To that end, I think u should be passionate about it and not necessarily thinking that it'll lead to an IT job. The science courses, for me, should be about studying the object, thinking of education past the degree itself.

IT orientated work is heavily practical, theories into practice, solving issues that are often company based, and applying projects to what other people's departments want to do.

For general support work, which is a big chunk of IT work, microsoft knowledge is a big plus, networking generally is a plus, confidence in what ur doing. A pc goes wrong, generally, it get's a rebuild. If it fails a rebuild, the hardware people look at it (often outside companies with a man onsite). These are the foot-in-the-door positions.

Further to that, special pcs in an environment are built to the basic standard of all the other 1000s - but have something different added to them, soft/hardware wize, to have them do the task required. These are dependent on what the company is all about. Gfx, edit, whatever.

Understanding what can happening if u unplug a patch cable in a hub room is pretty vital, dependent on ur environment can be catastrophic or meaningless. U either bring down an editing suite or stop some1's ebay browing ^.~

Programmers on the otherhand tend to intermix with other departments with their needs, hardly ever do support work in the general IT sense, and u may find 1 or 2 of them in an IT team of 50. So that's where the career choice in a climate might be. Bear in mind u'll be studying for 3/4 years and not getting a job 2morrow.

/eof waffle

What does the degree look like now ?

14-02-2009, 09:35:54

kataras
I am not exactly doing Computer Science degree, but Software Engineering rather. I still know some stuff, which might/might not be useful.
As far as the first year goes, every student attending computing school will have same courses/units at least up to the second semester when they can choose what units they wish to take.
Computer Science is a lot more broader course. Not only that you can study programming in various languages, but Development or Analysis of Information Systems, Networking, Data management, Web Maintenance and Development etc etc. Mind you that doesnt mean that you will study programming as deep as Software Engineer, you might get a 10unit (difficulty of the course) course wheres the Engineer will have same programming language for 20units.
In essence CS is good that you can choose so many units to study, and leave out the ones you hate or not good at. But its not so good that you only have a little nibble of each thing you study so my advice would be to choose what you think youd be better at and narrow it down, ie if you like html and internet - Web Develomenet, like programming - Software Engineering and etc.

14-02-2009, 10:32:56

zak4994
4 year Sandwich course for work experience!

14-02-2009, 11:49:37

Youngie1337
Experience and interest is all that is needed. Having fancy degrees will get you a certain length, mainly from course to course.

Enjoy IT and learn at home experimenting, if you find it interesting you will find a job in the sector almost instantly.

15-02-2009, 17:06:52

mrapoc
thing is

you can be as enthusiastic as you want or as knowledgeable but degrees are there for one purpose...a benchmark on your knowledge!

Sure if you get the experience great! But in todays lifestyle/industry from my view the majority of employers wont even look at you unless you have a degree

Iv looked at computer science - it looks the most broad course out of the computing spectrum - it has maths (but what doesnt nowadays) but also covers programming, low level hardware, the technical side of networking etc.

Seems the one for me

15-02-2009, 17:26:02

Youngie1337

thing is

you can be as enthusiastic as you want or as knowledgeable but degrees are there for one purpose...a benchmark on your knowledge!

Sure if you get the experience great! But in todays lifestyle/industry from my view the majority of employers wont even look at you unless you have a degree

Iv looked at computer science - it looks the most broad course out of the computing spectrum - it has maths (but what doesnt nowadays) but also covers programming, low level hardware, the technical side of networking etc.

Seems the one for me



When I went for this last job interview it was a very important role. I slapped my degrees and certificates on the desk and he just said, we won't need them for now. He asked me what I knew and if I was interested, I was sure as hell keen, he chose me over these much higher qualified people.

Maybe it has just been my experience but having the piece of paper to prove it can only get you so far.

15-02-2009, 18:40:52

Diablo
It depends what job your going for, obviously, if you were to go in for a role as a research chemist with no chemistry degree, you would be told where to get off.
In some ways degrees are a qualification saying you've had further education, and this may or may not be relevant in your future career, but other degrees are going to be directly involved in what you are going to be doing. It also depends what job your going to be going for and where the degrees came from.
If you were applying for a job where everyone has a degree not having one is obviously going to be a big problem.
Currently as far as I can see from my friends doing compsci, this course is quite logic/maths based, with a heavy focus on logic before getting to anything else and basically only a cursory look at the physical processing hardware and barely any networking. This is only first year though and I only hear about it through them.

16-02-2009, 10:52:10

Bungral
I left school at 12 and took 1 GCSE... I'm now working for Hounslow Council in ICT Frontline and am well happy. 153 people applied for the post and I got it... They said loads were much more qualified than me but they saw potential in me. It was my first IT job too.

Degrees aren't essential. They can help obviously, especially for more advanced rolls and skipping the first few steps on the latter perhaps, but not essential.
Reply
x

Register for the OC3D Newsletter

Subscribing to the OC3D newsletter will keep you up-to-date on the latest technology reviews, competitions and goings-on at Overclock3D. We won't share your email address with ANYONE, and we will only email you with updates on site news, reviews, and competitions and you can unsubscribe easily at any time.

Simply enter your name and email address into the box below and be sure to click on the links in the confirmation emails that will arrive in your e-mail shortly after to complete the registration.

If you run into any problems, just drop us a message on the forums.