New Memory Chip Technology

"IBM, Macronix & Qimonda Show Off Their New Memory Chip Technology. Read on to find out more...
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News <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ufo1.com/ad/c.js"></script> Posted 12/12/2006
Author: PV5150
Source: IBM

Scientists from IBM, Macronix and Qimonda announced joint research results that give a major boost to a new type of computer memory with the potential to be the successor to flash memory chips, which are widely used in computers and consumer electronics like digital cameras and portable music players.

The advancement heralds future success for "phase-change" memory, which appears to be much faster and can be scaled to dimensions smaller than flash – enabling future generations of high-density "non-volatile" memory devices as well as more powerful electronics. Non-volatile memories do not require electrical power to retain their information. By combining non-volatility with good performance and reliability, this phase-change technology may also enable a path toward a universal memory for mobile applications.

Phase Change Memory
Phase Change Memory
Phase Change Memory

Working together at IBM Research labs on both U.S. coasts, the scientists designed, built and demonstrated a prototype phase-change memory device that switched more than 500 times faster than flash while using less than one-half the power to write data into a cell. The device's cross-section is a minuscule 3 by 20 nanometers in size, far smaller than flash can be built today and equivalent to the industry's chip-making capabilities targeted for 2015. This new result shows that unlike flash, phase-change memory technology can improve as it gets smaller with Moore's Law advancements.

The new material is a complex semiconductor alloy created in an exhaustive search conducted at IBM's Almaden Research Center in San Jose, Calif. It was designed with the help of mathematical simulations specifically for use in phase-change memory cells. The technical details of this research will be presented this week at the IEEE's 2006 International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) in San Francisco.

Feel free to discuss this technology in our forum

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Most Recent Comments

11-12-2006, 06:46:39

nathan
at 85ghz it will never see the light of day in the uk.

11-12-2006, 07:43:19

llwyd
I think the military already has things like that but on a smaller scale (Hams dad holds the patent on something similar actually) for radio signals and stuff to avoid tracing. I heard someone talking about wireless electricity on the radio the other day :confused:

11-12-2006, 07:57:03

Nagaru
That is interesting but I think a long way off considering that these "areas" of fiber optics. Also this is in the microwave range and I would assume will "fry" people.

11-12-2006, 23:04:36

macgamesrule
I dunno frying necessarily; phone companies for one already use microwave transmission to send calls over long distances where there's no cable laid. It's those really big towers covered with half-sphere looking things...

An interesting technology to say the least; I think the next couple decades will see some pretty significant breakthroughs in a lot of fields, communications being one of them.

12-12-2006, 07:27:18

Nagaru
[QUOTE=macgamesrule]I dunno frying necessarily; phone companies for one already use microwave transmission to send calls over long distances where there's no cable laid. It's those really big towers covered with half-sphere looking things...

An interesting technology to say the least; I think the next couple decades will see some pretty significant breakthroughs in a lot of fields, communications being one of them.[/QUOTE]

I know that microwaves are used for communications, but I doubt they would be allowed to install the towers so that the beam passed close to houses.

12-12-2006, 07:31:19

Rastalovich

I heard someone talking about wireless electricity on the radio the other day :confused:


Were they talking about Star Trek ?

12-12-2006, 07:34:53

FragTek
People have been working on a feasable means of wireless electricity for ages. It's already been done, but it's near impossible to harness and use without causing damage to people :p

12-12-2006, 07:36:49

Nagaru
It is also highly inefficient and becomes more so as the distance is increased.

12-12-2006, 07:38:51

Rastalovich

People have been working on a feasable means of wireless electricity for ages. It's already been done, but it's near impossible to harness and use without causing damage to people :p



Well they do have N-Cells and flux capacitors working off dilythium.

12-12-2006, 08:15:37

PV5150
ROFL, Rastalovich is taking the [IMG]http://oldforums.overclock3d.net/oc3d_gfx/smilies/cussing.gif[/IMG][IMG]http://oldforums.overclock3d.net/oc3d_gfx/smilies/cussing.gif[/IMG][IMG]http://oldforums.overclock3d.net/oc3d_gfx/smilies/cussing.gif[/IMG][IMG]http://oldforums.overclock3d.net/oc3d_gfx/smilies/cussing.gif[/IMG], although I haven't heard the N-Cells bit before :D Gotta love those flux capacitors connected to the Dylithium Chrystals
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