Win an OCZ DDR3 Triple Channel Memory Kit with OCZ and Intel Core i7

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Win 6GB's of OCZ DDR3 PC3-10666 Intel® i7 Triple Channel Memory By Entering Overclock3D's Latest Poll


OCZ DDR3 PC3-10666 Intel i7 Triple Channel MemoryHere at Overclock3D we love hardware, and we love nothing more than giving it away to the enthusiast community in our competitions. As you may well be aware, Overclock3D now give away brand new hardware to one lucky forum member EVERY MONTH. Thats right, you as a reader of Overclock3D are in with a chance of winning a new bit of kit for your beloved rig every pay day!

Entering couldn't be simpler either. Just register on our forums and then vote in our monthly poll (seen above-right). Each and every poll will be sponsored by a top manufacturer or retailer with a prize being awarded to one lucky poll entrant chosen at random at the end of the month.

This months poll is sponsored by Memory Manufacturer, OCZ Technology and Intel's Core i7 who have kindly donated 6GB's of OCZ DDR3 PC3-10666 Intel® i7 Triple Channel Memory. To be in with a chance of winning this excellent prize, all you need to do is answer the simple question below in our Overclock3D Poll:

Are you planning to go triple channel within the next few months?

The random winner will be selected on 28/12/08. GOOD LUCK!

Discuss this competition in our forums.

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Most Recent Comments

22-11-2008, 18:08:28

monkey7
The main advantage of having the psu in the bottom is -at least in my opinion- the so called 'weight point' of the case. The lower this theoretic point is (= main portion of the weight is located lower) the more stable the case is. Assumed that the PSU makes 20% of the cases' weight it could gain you some serious stability.

Secondly, the psu does not take hot air in its intake when it's located at the bottom. This makes it quieter :)

Thirdly, when you more the psu from botto mto top you can place another fan/larger rad at the top of your case.

Fourthly, the psu fan often 'bounces' air back because of the high air resistance (inner components) inside the psu. This causes the warm air not to be exhausted properly.

22-11-2008, 18:18:50

atarist
[quote name='monkey7']The main advantage of having the psu in the bottom is -at least in my opinion- the so called 'weight point' of the case. The lower this theoretic point is (= main portion of the weight is located lower) the more stable the case is. Assumed that the PSU makes 20% of the cases' weight it could gain you some serious stability.

i never lookt at it like that befor,
one of my p.c.s i west it on a book under the desk the fhing rocks about a bit,
and come 2 fink of it the top of the case is a bit top hevey

22-11-2008, 18:24:51

atarist

It seems to be a recent trend in case design, Manufacturers like to split up the case into various chambers to improve the cooling of their cases. It was also at least slightly influenced by intel's failed BTX format, a few years ago it was going to be the future of PC design, but it never really happened.



I do like the look and styel of the cases with p.s.u. at the bottem,
BTX was BTX the mobo i never did find out my self like ATX/ITX mobos.?
didt dell do a BTX set-up.?

22-11-2008, 18:44:35

MeltedDuron
http://www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/p4/btx/ There's some info from Intel on the BTX format. They basically designed the whole thing around the prescott processor, I really do feel sorry for anyone who put money into the platform.

As AMD were dominating the enthusiast market at the time with the A64, and had no wish to switch design over to BTX, the ATX format that was originally designed for the Pentium 1 in the early-mid 90's was here to stay!

It's pretty mental that the form factor we use today is based on something so old I think.

I think Dell have always used proprietary setups, although a lot of their stuff is very similar to BTX in format (Even their servers that I've been working on for years) and I do believe a few of their desktops are BTX based.

22-11-2008, 21:24:48

llwyd

The main advantage of having the psu in the bottom is -at least in my opinion- the so called 'weight point' of the case. The lower this theoretic point is (= main portion of the weight is located lower) the more stable the case is. Assumed that the PSU makes 20% of the cases' weight it could gain you some serious stability.

Secondly, the psu does not take hot air in its intake when it's located at the bottom. This makes it quieter :)

Thirdly, when you more the psu from botto mto top you can place another fan/larger rad at the top of your case.

Fourthly, the psu fan often 'bounces' air back because of the high air resistance (inner components) inside the psu. This causes the warm air not to be exhausted properly.



Think youve come up with some points even they didnt think of lol.

Thats's exactly why atarist ^ It's a much more practical solution overall IMO. Plus it makes things neater in terms of wireing and it doesnt get in the way when mounting a motherboard or cpu cooler :)

23-11-2008, 13:10:58

atarist
There's some info from Intel on the BTX format. They basically designed the whole thing around the prescott processor, I really do feel sorry for anyone who put money into the platform.

As AMD were dominating the enthusiast market at the time with the A64, and had no wish to switch design over to BTX, the ATX format that was originally designed for the Pentium 1 in the early-mid 90's was here to stay!

It's pretty mental that the form factor we use today is based on something so old I think.

I think Dell have always used proprietary setups, although a lot of their stuff is very similar to BTX in format (Even their servers that I've been working on for years) and I do believe a few of their desktops are BTX based.[/QUOTE]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

the thing about Dall is that i have had one of there p.c.,
and the mobo was back 2 frount i was going 2 put a universal atx in the Dell,
Case but no-way wound it fit the Dell case.
becoz the Dell case had the mobo mounted on the left-hand side of the case
the atx mobo i had was for a right-hand case.

plus have you ever tryed Dells L G A 775 heatsink n fans,
On a universal atx mobo lol
Dell love 2 make there LGA 775 heatsink n fans smaller comperd 2 ATX ones.

23-11-2008, 13:15:56

atarist

Think youve come up with some points even they didnt think of lol.

Thats's exactly why atarist ^ It's a much more practical solution overall IMO. Plus it makes things neater in terms of wireing and it doesnt get in the way when mounting a motherboard or cpu cooler :)



come 2 fink of it i do remember that (TIME) made a p.c. with it at the bottem,
Of the case.

23-11-2008, 16:58:26

D-Cyph3r

Plus it makes things neater in terms of wireing and it doesnt get in the way when mounting a motherboard or cpu cooler :)



I've always found it easier to to manage the cables in a case with a top mounted PSU myself....


In large towers like the Cosmos S and Lian Li's you always end up with 1 or 2 cables being just too short to route properly. >.<


But I do agree that the lower center of gravity and roof radiator options are trade-offs I prefer.:)

23-11-2008, 17:24:53

gotmaxpower
I think its better for the PSU to be at the top of the case, as illustrated below.



- The 120mm fan in the top of the PSU blows air down into the crosswind of the exhaust fan.
- The exhaust fan pulls out any hot air coming down from the PSU.

If the PSU was at the bottom of the case, it would blow hot air up onto the GPU and would presumably increase temperatures. In this case, as we all know, heat rises, hence creating a cloud of air at the top of the case which would need several fans to counter act. Although, as I'm saying this, I realize I own an Antec 900. D'oh.

23-11-2008, 21:43:02

MeltedDuron
you've got it slightly wrong there mate, the PSU exhausts air out of the case. The original ATX specification didn't require a case exhaust fan because the PSU fan provided ample airflow for the passively cooled pentiums and K5's of the day. Oh how times have changed!

Alex
Reply
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